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Big Woods Hardcover – October, 1996


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Wilderness Adventures Pr (October 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1885106408
  • ISBN-13: 978-1885106407
  • Product Dimensions: 10.8 x 7.5 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,422,712 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

The first paperback edition of the 1955 collection of four stories about nature and hunting includes The Bear and Race at Morning .
Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

From Library Journal

This 1955 title combines the four stories "The Bear," "The Old People," "A Bear Hunt," and "Race at Morning," gleaned from assorted Faulkner works.
Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

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Customer Reviews

If you are a fan, this book has the stories you will like.
Dean Baird
They have a full range of effect, humor, tragedy, and style originality with well fleshed chararacterizations.
Joyce Metzger
This version reads more smoothly as the added section interrupts the story to dwell on past events.
Stefan Koch

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By R. Moench on October 17, 2004
Format: Paperback
I've occasionally used this collection as required reading for troubled and directionless young adult males. "The Race at Dawn" provides an excellent starting place for a discussion for the need to complete their education. The review from 1999 by "A READER" comments about "The Bear" being incomplete; all five sections are printed in the version collected in "Go Down Moses."
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 27, 1998
Format: Paperback
I'm re-reading this book and really enjoying the stories (read it as tales in a novel). The book really puts different views to various people's ways of looking at the same stories and family histories. Read this and know why Faulkner is considered one of the best American novelists of all time. His people ring true, and two stories, "The Old People" and "The Bear", are just fantastic.
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15 of 18 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 25, 1999
Format: Paperback
Of course the short stories here are excellent, but it is terrible that the origional Part Four of The Bear has been removed. Anyone who enjoys The Bear owes it to themselves to find a complete copy (it will have five parts) because Part Four is arguably the most important and meaningful portion of the entire story!
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13 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Orrin C. Judd VINE VOICE on November 18, 2000
Format: Paperback
The essence of political conservatism is the yearning for the best of the culture and moral clime of the past--the sense that something of value to our souls has been lost in the headlong rush of human social progress. Political liberalism, on the other hand, assumes that bureaucrats and technocrats can improve upon centuries old social structures, cultural inheritances and moral codes. But there is one area where the roles of the two are reversed and that is when it comes to the environment. The American Left has a long standing love affair with nature; from Jefferson to Thoureau, Teddy Roosevelt to Al Gore, there is a pastoral strain to liberal politics, a kind of religious belief in an Edenic past and a nearly Biblical sense that man's attempts to control nature have a corrupting influence.
This sentiment has perhaps never been treated more beautifully in our Literature than in Faulkner's great short novel, The Bear. The story of a succession of hunting seasons is basically a warning from Faulkner that as we destroy the wilderness we threaten the traditions and values of our society. Nature is symbolized by the cagey ancient ursine, Old Ben. Most of the tale is told by Ike McCaslin, who is 10 years old as it begins. Initially he flounders through the woods, but as he surrenders himself to the primordial forces of Nature, he is able to sense the bear's presence. Another year, when he sets aside his gun and compass and other accouterments of civilization, he is finally able to see the bear.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Stefan Koch on July 2, 2013
Format: Paperback
The version of The Bear as printed in this volume is as Faulkner meant it to be. The version as printed in Go Down Moses includes an additional section that links the story to the rest of Go Down Moses. This version reads more smoothly as the added section interrupts the story to dwell on past events. This is a great collection of stories and one I would give to anyone wanting to get to know Faulkner.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Joyce Metzger on April 1, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition
This is a collection of four stories about hunting, all woven together to form the fabric of the Big Woods. William Faulkner writing about the conflict between nature and man.
This was a new time, a new age had been born, the old days, the last broadhorn and keelboat were gone, the river hero was now the steamboat gambler. Those obsolete too. Felling a tree which took two hundred years to grow, in order to extract from it a bear, or a capful of honey. No environmentalists. No one to nudge the preservation conscience.
In an instant they almost resembled a piece of statuary: the clinging dog, the bear, the man astride it's back, working and probing the buried blade. It didn't collapse, crumble. It fell all of a piece, as a tree falls, so that all three, man, dog and bear, seemed to bounce once.
The Old People were the Chickasaws. The quadroon slave woman was Sam's mother. Grandfathers had owned the land long before white men ever saw it. They had vanished, their blood running now in another race, in bondage, drawing toward the irrevocable course, barren because Sam Feathers had no children.
The earth don't want to just keep things, hoard them, it wants to use them again. The seed, acorns, buried carrion, all refuse dies. They seethe, struggle until they reach light and air again, hunting the sun still.
Faulkner's words are poignant. They have a full range of effect, humor, tragedy, and style originality with well fleshed chararacterizations. These are very powerful, intuitive thoughts that stimulate rousing emotions. Excellent.
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By N. Trandahl on March 22, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Big Woods was my introduction to William Faulkner, and I waited far too long it seems (owing to my immature aversion to Faulkner due to his criticism of my beloved Ernest Hemingway). These four tales and their prologues were so rich and vivid with their sylvan tradition, ritual, barbarism, naturalism and romanticism. Through the progression of the tales, up until the last lines, I grew sorrowed and lamented the gradual ravaging of Big Bottom, the Big Woods. A very poignant work. I look forward to enjoying some more of William Faulkner's works. I will let Faulkner's and Hemingway's verbal jabs at one another die with those writers, and I will enjoy both of their works.
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More About the Author

Born in 1897 in New Albany, Mississippi, William Faulkner was the son of a family proud of their prominent role in the history of the south. He grew up in Oxford, Mississippi, and left high school at fifteen to work in his grandfather's bank.

Rejected by the US military in 1915, he joined the Canadian flyers with the RAF, but was still in training when the war ended. Returning home, he studied at the University of Mississippi and visited Europe briefly in 1925.

His first poem was published in The New Republic in 1919. His first book of verse and early novels followed, but his major work began with the publication of The Sound and the Fury in 1929. As I Lay Dying (1930), Sanctuary (1931), Light in August (1932), Absalom, Absalom! (1936) and The Wild Palms (1939) are the key works of his great creative period leading up to Intruder in the Dust (1948). During the 1930s, he worked in Hollywood on film scripts, notably The Blue Lamp, co-written with Raymond Chandler.

William Faulkner was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1949 and the Pulitzer Prize for The Reivers just before his death in July 1962.

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