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Billy Hazelnuts and the Crazy Bird Hardcover – June 22, 2010


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Hardcover, June 22, 2010
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Billy Hazelnuts and the Crazy Bird + Billy Hazelnuts + Drinky Crow's Maakies Treasury
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Product Details

  • Series: Billy Hazelnuts
  • Hardcover: 104 pages
  • Publisher: Fantagraphics; 1 edition (June 22, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1560979178
  • ISBN-13: 978-1560979173
  • Product Dimensions: 0.6 x 6.3 x 9.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,150,572 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Starred Review. Millionaire's backyard golem returns in this winning follow-up to 2006's Billy Hazelnuts. With a piecrust body, hazelnut eyes, and titanic strength, the title character struggles with the vicissitudes of human--and animal--society. This all-ages-friendly tale opens with a comical but sincere note of existential angst, but Billy ultimately discovers his orientation in the world through his relationships with others. Rescuing the family cat from an attacking owl, Billy finds he has caused the abandonment of a newly hatched chick. This foundling attempts to hungrily devour Billy even as he quests forth to find the "crazy bird" 's mother. The book is drawn in a loosened version of Millionaire's ornate pen and ink style, evoking the vital, calligraphed fantasies of turn-of-the-20th-century cartoonists and children's book illustrators. The loose hatching matches the book's propulsive narrative pace, but pauses at intervals for a potent accumulation of detail or an expressive character moment. The tale itself frequently veers toward the lunatic, but if it skirts the surreal it does so precisely by taking the kinds of unfettered narrative turns that characterize the best children's literature. And like those books, Millionaire's creates a safe space for exploration that remains grounded throughout in a humane sensibility that quietly makes itself known by showing, not telling.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Booklist

In this follow-up to Billy Hazelnuts (2006), Millionaire carries on the sublime childlike flair that is a far cry from the sweet sense of innocence often ascribed to wee ones. Billy (a manikin made of garbage) is wont to run off maniacally at a moment’s notice to punch an owl in the face, but he also embarks on a determined (if crazy) quest to reunite baby owl with Momma, even as the little bird chomps away at him, leaving nothing but his two hazelnut eyes behind. No one rides the edge between charming and demented quite like Maakies cartoonist Millionaire, and he’s in hilariously fine form here. --Ian Chipman

More About the Author

I was born in the fishing town of Gloucester Massachusetts, a town full of fishermen and seascape painters. My grandparents were artists, they taught me how to use ink pens and oil paint. My grandpop showed me lots of old newspaper comics he had saved, old ones, Roy Crane, Lionel Feininger, Winsor McKay. When I was in college I discovered R. Crumb and S. Clay Wilson. I drew a lot of perverted comics, until one day I discovered George Herriman, the grandfather of American comics. The true master. People often ask me if comics are "art." Whatever, I don't care what you call them, but when you're immersed in a collection of Herriman Sundays you understand what they're getting at.
I love funny comics but I love moving, emotional, poetical comics, too. Preferably a mixture of both.

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
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See all 9 customer reviews
Keep em' coming Tony!
S. Luker
I was astonishedly amazed by the artwork and story in this brilliant book.
Andrewmatt Olivas
It's another winner from Tony Millionaire!
bortly

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By bortly on June 20, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
It's great to see Billy Hazelnuts back! This is a fantastic graphic novel, the draftsmanship is excellent, as usual, and the characters are really funny. And the story is good for all ages, honest. It's another winner from Tony Millionaire!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By J. B. Shoup on September 18, 2010
Format: Hardcover
Fairy tales, even in their modern sanitized forms, have always been a place for children to safely explore a dangerous world. Comic art was once a perfect medium for that same exploration, whether via walking beds in Slumberland, caped marvels smashing robots, or Popeye exploring some new desert isle.

Somewhere along the way, comics abandoned young readers. Great work was and is produced, of course, whether in Alan Moore's Cold War commentary (Watchmen), Art Spiegelman's disarming anthropomorphic Holocaust account (The Complete Maus: A Survivor's Tale (No 1)), Marjane Satrapi's haunting memoir (The Complete Persepolis), or Ryan North's post-post-modern philosophical gas (the best of Dinosaur Comics: 2003-2005 A.D.). Comics are no longer merely "funny books," instead touching on areas as diverse as Lovecraftian horror and punk rock tour journals. Yet save for a few mindlessly-simplified TV spin-off comics or toyetic anime-inspired productions, young readers continue to be left behind until they grow cynical enough for the art form in its best-selling forms.

Tony Millionaire, of course, is no stranger to the adult side of comics, though he remains an outsider. His whimsically obscene and obtuse "Maakies" is a stand-out of modern strips and he has dabbled in dark tales with his "Sock Monkey.
Read more ›
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By prufrock on June 20, 2010
Format: Hardcover
In what seems to be an increasingly dumbed-down world of graphic novels and cartoons, Tony Millionaire continues to prove that there are still artists who can produce work that not only satisfies those with more erudite and demanding tastes, but provides new strata on which to enjoy his odd mixture of genius and gutter.

I'd like to see him take over the work of providing strips for Bazooka Joe. It would become the biggest selling gum in history, while all the while reminding its consumers that they are, indeed, better than all the rest of that slovenly hoi-polloi. If you haven't yet experienced his work, start here, and then go waaaaay back to the beginning of Maakies, and soak it up. You'll be a better man for it.
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By S. Luker on June 20, 2010
Format: Hardcover
Yet another awesome book from Tony Millionaire! I own every book he's put out (as far as i know). Keep em' coming Tony!
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Format: Hardcover
Winnie The Pooh this is not! If you have a love for slightly melancholy and offbeat storytelling paired with beautiful, detailed, and quirky artwork, you'll be pleased with this further adventure of Hazelnuts.
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