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Biology Is Technology: The Promise, Peril, and New Business of Engineering Life Hardcover – March 27, 2010

ISBN-13: 978-0674035447 ISBN-10: 0674035445

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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Harvard University Press (March 27, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0674035445
  • ISBN-13: 978-0674035447
  • Product Dimensions: 9.3 x 6.4 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,335,108 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Biology is Technology makes a tremendous contribution to public analysis of a very important emerging field. Although various commentators have discussed particular aspects of synthetic biology (e.g. risk regulation, intellectual property considerations), I am not aware of a book that encapsulates all of the varying strands of the debate. In addition, the book takes a set of provocative and interesting stances on the subjects that it addresses. It is obviously written by someone who has been a longstanding participant in, and commentator on, the field. Although I do not necessarily agree with all of the positions taken by the book, they are well-defended and thought through. (Arti K. Rai, Elvin R. Latty Professor of Law, Duke Law School)

Carlson clearly frames a fresh future for biotechnology. Each chapter, from technology trends to property rights and biosecurity conundrums, invites close reading and vibrant discussion. (Drew Endy, Stanford Bioengineering & The BioBricks Foundation)

Since Rob Carlson is THE authoritative tracker of progress in biotech, this book is the most complete---and exciting&mdashchronicle&mdash of the technological revolution that promises to dominate this century. (Stewart Brand, Author of Whole Earth Discipline: An Ecopragmatist Manifesto)

In this new book, bioengineer Robert H. Carlson forecasts the rise of the cell and the subsequent emergence of biological techniques for making fuels, synthetic DNA that builds new organisms, and reverse-engineered viruses for making vaccines. Biologists, Carlson says, are the new engineers, and the future is in remodeling life as we know it. (Wired 2010-03-01)

[Carlson] presents an informative view of the future prospects for biotechnology and its regulation. (Michael A. Goldman Nature 2010-04-22)

Biology Is Technology is essential reading for anyone who wishes to understand the current state of biotechnology and the opportunities and dangers it may create. (Alex Soojung-Kim Pang American Scientist 2010-11-01)

A thoughtful attempt to put what we think we know about biotechnology into a larger context, by a physicist-turned-bioentrepreneur. (The Economist 2010-12-04)

About the Author

Robert H. Carlson is a Principal at Biodesic LLC.

More About the Author

Dr. Rob Carlson is a Principal at Biodesic, an engineering, consulting, and design firm in Seattle. At the broadest level, Rob is interested in the future role of biology as a human technology. He has worked to develop new biological technologies in both academic and commercial environments, focusing on molecular measurement and microfluidic systems. Carlson is the author of the book Biology is Technology: The Promise, Peril, and New Business of Engineering Life, published in 2010 by Harvard University Press. Rob earned a doctorate in Physics from Princeton University in 1997.

From 2002 to 2007, Dr. Carlson was a Senior Scientist in the Electrical Engineeering department at the University of Washington. From 2003 to 2008, he provided technology analysis and strategic consulting as a Senior Associate at Bio-Economic Research Associates (Bio-era), writing extensively on pandemic preparedness, synthetic vaccines, biofuels, and biological technologies, and presenting briefings on these subjects to executives and government officials around the world. From 1997 to 2002 he was a Research Fellow at The Molecular Sciences Institute in Berkeley, CA.

Links to additional articles and a weblog can be found at http://www.synthesis.cc .

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Benjamin J. Hunt on March 23, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Book was review of recent adventures in open-source and small scale biotechnology. If you haven't been reading the scholarly literature on devices and breakthroughs, I can think of no better crash course.

From Keasling's entire engineered metabolic pathways to iGEM to Amyris's new fuel producing bacteria, the author has an excellent and informed perspective on the breakthroughs that are worth thinking about.

The author also describes in detail the difficult morass of patent and copyright law concerning biotechnology. His description of CAMBIA's "walled garden" is better than any I have read, even in books exclusively about open-source biotechnology. (Although there is currently only one, Biobazaar).

His description of garage biotechnology is sparse, mainly due to the above morass, and it would have been nice to have more details on the LavaAmp, this author's most recent work, which is a very cheap, reusable PCR device.

This book goes by fast, and is a must read for anyone looking to start or invest in a small biotechnology company, or anyone who wants to do it themselves.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By William B. Swift on March 15, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Excellent survey of recent developments AND a thorough argument that openness contributes more to our safety from future attacks and accidents than trying to restrict knowledge and materials could. Not quite up to date, as he wrote in the Afterword, "everyone in the field is running so fast that it is impossible to keep up", but more so than any other book I have found. Most of the detailed discussion of the actual technology is up to about 2 years ago. A good discussion of the benefits and problems of patents as they apply to biotechnology (and to any field where many patents may apply to a single product (patent thickets)). Surprisingly readable for the amount of information included.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Daniel Orr on April 9, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This book is engaging, timely, and well-written. Carlson provides a succinct analysis of why biotechnology isn't moving as quickly as its advocates hope, but an equally powerful refutation of the doomsayers who claim new technology is something to be feared. Highly recommended for anyone starting out in biotechnology, but experts may also find Carlson's examples useful in crafting their own explanations.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By R. Qualls on January 28, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Biology Is Technology is written like a quality research paper. It covers the current challenges with delivering bioengineering/biotechnology solutions and what is being done to meet those challenges. This is a no BS book. Carlson goes into the meat right off the bat, and you are not likely to be disappointed with any of the chapters by the time you finish. If you are an investor, entrepreneur, executive, or are just curious, this book needs to be on your bookshelf.

Table of Contents:

1. What Is Biology?
2. Building with Biological Parts
3. Learning to Fly (or Yeast, Geese, and 747s)
4. The Second Coming of Synthetic Biology
5. A Future History of Biological Engineering
6. A Pace of Change in Biological Technologies
7. The International Genetically Engineered Machines Competition
8. Reprogramming Cells and Building Genomes
9. The Promise and Peril of Biological Technologies
10. The Sources of Inspiration and the Effects of Existing and Proposed Regulations
11. Laying the Foundations for a Bioeconomy
12. Of Straitjackets and Springboards for Innovation
13. Open-Source Biology, or Open Biology?
14. What Makes a Revolution?
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