Engineering & Transportation
Biophysics of Computation: Information Processing in Sing... and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy New
$62.31
Qty:1
  • List Price: $74.00
  • Save: $11.69 (16%)
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Trade in your item
Get a $16.59
Gift Card.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Biophysics of Computation: Information Processing in Single Neurons (Computational Neuroscience) Paperback – October 28, 2004

ISBN-13: 978-0195181999 ISBN-10: 0195181999 Edition: 1st

Buy New
Price: $62.31
17 New from $60.94 16 Used from $55.30
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$62.31
$60.94 $55.30
Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


Frequently Bought Together

Biophysics of Computation: Information Processing in Single Neurons (Computational Neuroscience) + Theoretical Neuroscience: Computational and Mathematical Modeling of Neural Systems (Computational Neuroscience) + Dynamical Systems in Neuroscience: The Geometry of Excitability and Bursting (Computational Neuroscience)
Price for all three: $123.75

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

China
Engineering & Transportation Books
Discover books for all types of engineers, auto enthusiasts, and much more. Learn more

Product Details

  • Series: Computational Neuroscience
  • Paperback: 588 pages
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press; 1 edition (October 28, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0195181999
  • ISBN-13: 978-0195181999
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 7 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.9 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #328,060 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Christof Koch is at California Institute of Technology.

More About the Author

Christof Koch was born in the American Midwest, grew up in Holland, Germany, Canada, and Morocco. He studied Physics and Philosophy at the University of Tübingen in Germany and was awarded his Ph.D. in Biophysics in 1982. After 4 years at MIT, he joined the California Institute of Technology, where he is the Lois and Victor Troendle Professor of Cognitive and Behavioral Biology. In 2011, he became the Chief Scientific Officer at the Allen Institute for Brain Science in Seattle, planning for a ten year, large-scale, high through-put effort to understand the visual system of the mouse, with a focus on untangling the circuitry of it's cerebral cortex. He loves dogs, Apple Computers, rock and mountain climbing, biking and long-distance running.

His laboratory studies the biophysics of nerve cells, and the neuronal and computational basis of visual perception, attention, and consciousness and machine vision. Together with his long-time collaborator, Francis Crick, Koch pioneered the scientific study of consciousness. His latest book, Consciousness - Confessions of a Romantic Reductionist deals with the philosophical, religious, scientific, technological and personal questions relating to his research.

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
5 star
4
4 star
4
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 9 customer reviews
Dr. Koch has written many other books, but I think this stands out as his best.
Joseph J Grenier
`We will see', the author writes, `that dendrites can indeed be very powerful, nontraditional computational devices, implementing a number of continuous operations.'
Alwyn Scott
For young research scientists who are interested in understanding the dynamics of the human brain, Koch's book provides the ideal introduction.
Alwyn Scott (acs@math.arizona.edu)

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

30 of 31 people found the following review helpful By Alwyn Scott (acs@math.arizona.edu) on November 9, 1999
Format: Hardcover
For young research scientists who are interested in understanding the dynamics of the human brain, Koch's book provides the ideal introduction. Written in a precise yet easy style, the 21 Chapters of "Biophysics of Computation" begin at the beginning, introducing the reader to elementary electrical properties of membrane patches, linear cable theory, and the properties of passive dendritic trees. These introductory chapters are followed by two on the properties of synapses and the various ways that synapses can interact to perform logic on passive dendritic trees. Then the Hodgkin--Huxley formulation is discussed in detail, and various simplifying models are presented. As a basis for the Hodgkin--Huxley description, our present understanding of ionic channels is reviewed and the importance of calcium currents is emphasized. Further chapters discuss linearization of the H--H equations for small amplitude analysis, a careful examination of ionic diffusion, electrochemical properties of dendritic spines, synaptic plasticity, simple neural models, stochastic neural models. and the properties of bursting cells. Just about every facet of current neural knowledge is touched upon, with appropriate references to a carefully selected bibliography which will help the diligent novice delve deeply into whatever aspect of neural information processing that he or she chooses.
All of the above comprises an extended introduction to Chapters 17 through 19, which in the words of the author: "synthesize the previously learned lessons into a complete account of the events occuring in realistic dendritic trees with all of their attendant nonlinearities.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Alwyn Scott on April 14, 2004
Format: Hardcover
For young scientists who are interested in understanding the dynamics of the human brain this change in collective attitude is of profound significance, to which Koch's book provides an ideal introduction.Written in a precise yet easy style, the 21 chapters of Biophysics of Computation begin at the beginning, introducing the reader to elementary electrical properties of membrane patches, linear cable theory and the properties of passive dendritic trees. These introductory chapters are followed by two on the properties of synapses and the various ways that synapses can interact to perform logic on passive dendritic trees. Then the Hodgkin-Huxley formulation for impulse propagation on a single fibre is discussed in detail, and various simplifying models are presented. As a basis for the Hodgkin-Huxley description the present
understanding of ionic channels is reviewed, emphasizing the importance of calcium currents. Further chapters discuss linearization of the H-H equations for small amplitude behavior; present a careful examination of ionic diffusion processes; and describe electrochemical properties of dendritic spines, synaptic plasticity, simple neural models, stochastic neural models and the properties of bursting cells. Just about every facet of currently available neural knowledge is touched upon, with appropriate references to a carefully selected bibliography that will help the diligent novice delve deeply into whatever aspect of neural information processing he or she chooses.
All of the above comprises an extended introduction to Chapters 17 to 19, which: `synthesize the previously learned lessons into a complete account of the events occurring in realistic dendritic trees with all of their attendant nonlinearities'.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Jihwan Myung on July 6, 2001
Format: Hardcover
This book attempts to integrate bits from papers & other textbooks. Incorporated in the book are all but the most oft-discussed topics in neurophysics.
We don't know much about biological neurons. We don't really understand how they perform computation. Yet we have some models, approximations of the models, and theories of how the model neurons get organized to do computation. These are summarized in this book in a breif & comprehensive manner.
Some notes: 1) Portions of the book may be found in greater detail elsewhere. 2) The book is more about biophysics than compuation.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Joseph J Grenier on June 10, 2004
Format: Hardcover
This is the main book, the "Bible", on single neuron and ion channel computational modeling. Plenty of theory & rigor here! Professor Koch, with CalTech, models single ion channel function, dendrite, dendrite tree function, cable theory, stocastic theories, integrate-fire model, the Poisson model, and discusses how single neurons work together inside the brain. It is worth owning both as a reference book and to use in the laboratory. Dr. Koch has written many other books, but I think this stands out as his best. Methods in Neuronal Modeling 2nd edition is also very good. Koch's writings are complementary, but are not redundant. One can read this book without a problem if you know Calculus.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Matthew Bailey on January 24, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I am still about 1 half a year away from having all of the math and biology needed to understand ALL of this book, but it's descriptions of single-unit computational processes are clear and easy to parse even without a the additional math and biology.

That said, this IS a book for professionals and students of Computational Neuroscience. It is not intended for a lay audience.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again