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Bipolar Disorder: A Cognitive Therapy Approach Hardcover – January 1, 2002


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 260 pages
  • Publisher: American Psychological Association; 1st edition (January 1, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1557987890
  • ISBN-13: 978-1557987891
  • Product Dimensions: 10.4 x 7.2 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.7 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #521,210 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

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See all 7 customer reviews
The writing is excellent and book is well organized too.
Avery Z. Conner
Therapists work with clients in having the clients apply cognitive therapy self-help methods to attenuate their mania or hypomania.
George Hedrick
Book is a necessary reference for therapists dealing with Bipolar I and II patients.
Dr. Dom Wilks

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

25 of 27 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 18, 2002
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The authors, most of who are eminently respected in the field of cognitive therapy, have offered a compassionate and highly useful guide to working with individuals who suffer from manic depression. Their emphasis on respecting the dignity of each person and addressing the significant hopelessness and stigma that often accompany this condition is much needed. Rather than focusing exclusively on the psychopharmacological regimens that are part of the treatment of this disorder, the authors help to explicate the compounding variables such as drug and alcohol abuse, psychosocial and identity issues that complicate treatment. They address important issues such as self-disclosure and bipolar disorder in the practicing clinician, which are usually not mentioned in books about this condition. Their descriptions of the phenomenology of bipolar disorder are helpful and enlightening. All in all, I found this a useful, compassionate and long overdue guide for therapists who work with individuals struggling with this condition.
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17 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Avery Z. Conner on March 18, 2003
Format: Hardcover
This is an excellent book about cognitive therapy for bipolar disorder. It's a little newer than Basco's book on the same subject- both books are excellent and the reader could consult either or both to learn more about the subject. This book may have been written for psychiatrists and therapists, but I think it's well within reach for the layman, and so can be read by bipolar persons and their families as well. The writing is excellent and book is well organized too. Highly recommended. Avery Z. Conner, author of "Fevers of the Mind".
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16 of 21 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 18, 2001
Format: Hardcover
A complement to recent "encyclopedias" on the subject, this is an outstanding guide for the layman. More writing of this kind will be necessary to help understand this plague of our times. But this is basic, core material. This layman highly recommends it.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By George Hedrick on August 16, 2009
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Newman, C. F., Leahy, R. L., Beck, A. T., Reilly-Harrington, N. A., & Gyulai, L. (2002). Bipolar disorder: A cognitive therapy approach. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

Overall, I liked this book and believe it to be a worthwhile read. There a few things that I did not like about the book, and I mention those here ahead of explaining what I liked about the book. This book is a composite work among several authors, and it is apparent in the multiplicity writing styles. I find it somewhat annoying when the writing style changes in mid-chapter. Another annoyance is the way the authors switch between using the terms "bipolar disorder" and "manic-depressive illness" only stating they are using "manic-depressive illness" (or "manic-depression") to honor Kay Redfield Jameson, and giving no other reason for this interchange of terminology. Finally, I missed having a glossary. A glossary would have been especially useful for those of us readers who are not familiar with all of the terminology; words such as, trait, state, and mode. These words do not appear in the index either, making it difficult to find them when one wants to review specific parts of the text that one has read at an earlier time.
The first two chapters serve as an introduction and supply background information for the rest of the book. Chapter one surveys the various presentations of bipolar disorder including diagnosis, comorbidity in diagnosis, etiology, epidemiology, and prognoses for different presentations of bipolar disorder. The second chapter surveys the cognitive therapy model as it could be applied to clients who have been diagnosed with bipolar disorder.
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More About the Author

I guess I was destined to become a psychologist---given the experiences that I had. My parents were divorced when I was an infant--my father was an alcoholic and he was unable to support us. We moved back to New Haven Connecticut, lived with my Italian grandparents, and then moved to an Irish working-class housing project. We were poor, but we always had kids to play with and we learned the values of honesty, perseverance, fairness, and keeping your eye on the prize. When I wasn't playing basketball, I was reading everything. My mom told me that she couldn't afford to send me to college, but I insisted I would get a scholarship. Fast forward--- I got my undergraduate degree and PhD at Yale. Later I did my postdoctoral training with Aaron Beck, the founder of cognitive therapy.
I have been interested in helping people overcome depression, anxiety, substance abuse, and relationship issues. Someone asked me, "Don't you get depressed talking to depressed people?", and I respond, "There's nothing more rewarding than helping people overcome depression". I've written and edited fifteen other books for psychologists-- books on depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, personality disorders, etc. I lecture throughout the world and I am excited that several of my books have been adapted as training texts at leading schools. The great appeal of cognitive and behavioral therapy is that it actually works. People get better. There is hope--even if you feel hopeless.
I have also been fortunate to be able to play a role in professional organizations that promote cognitive therapy. I am the President of the International Association of Cognitive Therapy, President-elect of the Academy of Cognitive Therapy and I serve on a number of international and national committees, boards, and journals. My colleagues and I are helping to coordinate the training of cognitive therapists in Beijing, China, and at The American Institute for Cognitive Therapy we are training psychiatrists and psychologists in cognitive therapy in the New York area. I began working on the popular audience book, The Worry Cure, a few years ago. I decided to write an "honest" and "informed" book---one that drew on the best work by the top people worldwide. I have identified seven steps to overcome worry-- each step reflecting not only my own ideas but the work of leading experts. I am honored that many of them in USA, Canada and the UK have told me personally how much they appreciate the work reflected in this book. I owe a great deal of gratitude to the leading researchers throughout the world who really made this book possible. The Worry Cure tries to provide you with a serious understanding about the nature of worry--- the intolerance of uncertainty, the over-valuation of thinking, the avoidance of emotion, procrastination, the sense of urgency, and the maladaptive beliefs underlying your worry. I try to provide you with a full-range of self-help tools--- realizing that no one of them will work for everyone. A number of our patients at our clinic use the Worry Cure as part of their self-help--and they find it reassuring to know that they can now understand why their worry has persisted and how they can reverse this detrimental process.
The Worry Cure was named by Self Magazine as one of the top eight self-help books of all time. I was stunned when I read that--- my colleague Rene showed me the story in the magazine. But I have been fortunate to have been able to learn from my patients about the nature of their worry and what helps them--and to be able to write something that can make a difference.
My friend, Bill, said to me when I was writing this, "Bob, if you help one person overcome their anxiety it would be worth it." It's like the wise saying, "You save the world one life at a time".