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Biscotti: Recipes from the Kitchen of The American Academy in Rome, The Rome Sustainable Food Project Hardcover – October 12, 2010


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Product Details

  • Series: Rome Sustainable Food Project
  • Hardcover: 140 pages
  • Publisher: Little Bookroom (October 12, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1892145898
  • ISBN-13: 978-1892145895
  • Product Dimensions: 0.6 x 6.1 x 7.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #255,146 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

Of all Italian sweets, biscotti are among the best known and most reproduced. Although biscotti signify all sorts of cookies, the word most often conjures up in the American mind those twice-baked, ultracrunchy, nut-studded slices of dough perfect for dipping into a steaming cup of espresso. The American Academy in Rome has inaugurated a Sustainable Food Project that seeks to produce good food that only minimally diminishes the health of the environment. These biscotti recipes have all been developed by the academy’s staff and are served daily at tea and at dessert. The cookies come in a grand variety of shapes and sizes and feature nonstandard flours, such as those from farro, an antique grain. American cooks will instantly recognize the walnut jam biscotti as clones of perennial-favorite thumbprint cookies. Even the Italians have developed a fondness for peanut-butter cookies and all-American snickerdoodles. --Mark Knoblauch

Review

"...small but comprehensive, comprising 50 mostly traditional recipes for the treats best loved by the Academy's friends, students and workers (the authors are both employed there). Start with almond-cornmeal and work you way through to chocolate-hazelnut." —Charlotte Druckman, Wall Street Journal Weekend

“This book has recipes for all those cookies you tasted if you’ve ever been to Italy or lived there and thought you’d never find again, she says.” —FoxNews.com
 
“As you'd expect from a book with a foreword by Alice Waters, its recipes are sustainable yet delicious – 50 types of Italian cookies from pine nut and rosemary to honey and cardamom.” —The Observer, The 25 Best Cookbooks of 2010
 
“Proof that not all biscotti are sweet, super-crunchy half-moons. The bite-sized biscotti here range from dry and lightly sweet — the kind of cookie you'll want to soften with a dip into a caffe latte or a sweet Italian wine like vin santo — to highly sweetened varieties that don't need any liquid pairing.” —American Airlines, AA.com
 
“Dieters, beware: "Biscotti:" a smart little cookbook from the Little Bookroom, is Mephistopheles in cookie form…. With a forward by Alice Waters, this book is the first of a series of small hardbacks devoted to a single subject that will provide a glimpse into the American Academy in Rome.” —Pittsburgh Tribune
 
“Biscotti – Recipes from the kitchen of the American Academy in Rome offers a remarkable selection of cookies. The recipes can be made for greater numbers by scaling up the quantities, which makes it an interesting book for those with a crowd to feed and little time. Tastefully executed, this volume would be a well-received gift for any baker, be they novice or passionate expert.” —Mostly Food
 
“What can be better than a cup of coffee and a biscotti in the morning? That is the premise behind this lovely and mouthwatering book. Author Mona Talbott is the executive chef of the Rome Sustainable Food Project, which was established to create eco-gastronomic, authentic cuisine for the American Academy in Rome, where American cooks create biscotti, a mainstay of Italian sweets.” —June Sawyer, The Chicago Tribune
 
“Biscotti: Recipes from the Kitchen of The American Academy in Rome is a really charming book and filled with some familiar but mostly unfamiliar recipes.… I could easily see working my through this book, cookie by cookie!” —Amy Sherman, The Epi-Log on Epicurious
 
"Just in time for Thanksgiving is Mona Talbott's cookbook, Biscotti: Recipes from the Kitchen of the American University in Rome. The protege of Alice Waters consulted on the menus for Secretary of State Hillary Clinton's Chappaqua residence and worked as a private chef for Annie Leibowitz." —Vogue
 
“For the past four years, Canadian chef Mona Talbott of the American Academy in Rome—and author of the new cookie bible Biscotti—has transformed the institution’s dinner table into a model for sustainable dining.” —Travel + Leisure
 
“This charmer carefully explains techniques—and a little history—behind the traditional Italian bite-sized cookies served at the Academy’s communal table. A treat to try: biscotti al pistachio.” —Coastal Living

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Customer Reviews

Clear, concise, and easy to follow recipes.
Theo
I've used it and the recipes are as they would be taught in Italy. it makes a great gift as well and will use it as a hostess gift.
Carinacat
It will be interesting to see what the Academy and the Rome Sustainable Food Project come up with next.
Charles G. Thompson

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

24 of 24 people found the following review helpful By Book Lover on November 16, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
As for the negative review because the book contains no "biscotti" recipes, the reviewer is correct. This book has no "biscotti" or what we Americans have come to know as biscotti recipes.
Just as Italian grandmothers tend to refer to all long, strand pasta as spaghetti, this book refers to crisp cookies as biscotti. If you are looking for a lovely book to add to your collection, please consider this one. The pictures are charming and the recipe selection is perfect - a little bit of everything. There are no ooey-gooey chocolate brownie type sweets, but the kind of cookies you can mail, share and keep in a cookie jar to enjoy days later with tea or coffee. If you like walnuts, pictachios or pine nuts, this book is for you. I LOVE it.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Charles G. Thompson on January 23, 2011
Format: Hardcover
Biscotti comes from the Latin word biscoctus meaning 'twice cooked, or baked.' Baking them twice makes them dry, so they're easy to store for long periods of time. This was highly advantageous at one point in time. Twice-baked breads were useful during long journeys and wars, and were a staple food of the Roman legion. Now, it's simply a lovely left-over result of the original recipe that we're still enjoying today. From the kitchens of the American Academy in Rome, 'Biscotti' is a very special cookbook, a small love letter to one of Italy's most famous sweets.

The book is the first in a series of small hardcover cookbooks on single subjects to be published by the American Academy in Rome in conjunction with the Rome Sustainable Food Project, a program devoted to providing organic, local and sustainable meals for the community of artists who work and study at the AAR. Author, Mona Talbott is the American born, Chez Panisse-trained Executive Chef who oversees the kitchens of the Academy. Alice Waters is also part of the collaborative dining program advising on menus, and food choices. The program was first implemented in 2007 when the Academy remodeled and revamped the AAR kitchens. The Rome Sustainable Food Project facilitates the AAR's move towards sustainable, and local cooking and eating.

The book is comprised of fifty recipes for bite-sized cookies, or biscotti, and includes five categories: Milk and Wine; Nuts; Honey, Citrus, and Spice; Meringue; and Chocolate. There are recipes for cookies to be eaten throughout the day - for dipping into caffe latte in the morning, for after lunch (or dinner) dips into vino dolce, or dessert wine, or to eat with a mid-afternoon espresso.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By wendy hollister on November 17, 2010
Format: Hardcover
I love the way Chef Mona Talbott has created an easy to follow collection of cookie recipes. Her book has inspired me to bake every cookie recipe listed in the book. The question is which recipe do I bake first as they all look so good in the beautiful photographs. Mona is to be commended for her dedication and commitment to the slow food sustainability movement. Bellisma!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Allison M. Maltese on January 20, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Quite frankly I thought that this book would be about what Americans call Biscotti not cookies. However, it is full of authentic Italian cookie recipes, great photos and stories.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Francesca Murphy on September 8, 2012
Format: Hardcover
To those who complained that the book has a misleading title:
The title could not be more accurate, as these are Italian recipes and all the sweets in the books go by the name of "biscotti" in Italy. The book description and the editorial review both mention that the recipes include cookies and biscotti. It's a shame that those reviewers gave 1 star to the book because they didn't read the description.

As an aside, what Americans call "biscotti" go by many other names in Italian: cantucci, cantuccini, scroccadenti, tozzetti, biscotti di Prato, and more. "Biscotti" is just a generic term that encompasses all.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Michelle on March 27, 2011
Format: Hardcover
This book is quickly becoming the first source I consult when in the mood for a delicious biscotto - high praise, given that it competes with recipes for childhood favorites handed down from an Italian nonna. Talbot and Misenti have succeeded in paring down each of their cookie recipes to a handful of delicious essentials which, for the baker who heeds their advice not to compromise on quality ingredients, yield cookies that not only are delicious but satisfy in a way no sugar-overloaded or artificially flavored competitor can. (Think of these cookies as true "comfort food" with none of the empty calorie guilt or sugar hangover!) My favorites so far: "Biscotti al cioccolato e caffe" made with Sharffen Berger 70% chocolate baking bars and "Lingue di Gatti" (be sure to use a *small* tip for piping the dough -- the "cat's tongues" will expand while cooking!)

Previous reviewers are correct to note that "biscotti" translates as "cookies." Many Americans use the term "biscotti" to refer to what Italians refer to more specifically as "biscotti di Prato" (cookies from Prato) or, more generally, "cantucci." This book does include three recipes for the familiar twice-baked cantucci, including the classic cantucci di Prato. It thus is a wonderful addition to the cookbook collection of those keen on making homemade cantucci that far surpass the individually wrapped imposters on sale at your local chain bookstore. It also serves as an inspiring invitation to those of us eager to expand our horizons into the delectable world populated with Talbot's and Misenti's little pieces of paradise.
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