Biting the Moon (Andi Oliver Series) and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $15.00
  • Save: $3.50 (23%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 2 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Biting the Moon has been added to your Cart
Used: Acceptable | Details
Sold by owlsbooks
Condition: Used: Acceptable
Comment: Book is used, fast shipping and great customer service.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Biting the Moon Paperback – March 1, 2000

56 customer reviews

See all 18 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$11.50
$0.38 $0.01
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
$14.99

Best Books of the Year So Far
Best Books of the Year So Far
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2015's Best Books of the Year So Far in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.
$11.50 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Only 2 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Biting the Moon + Dakota + Belle Ruin
Price for all three: $39.76

Some of these items ship sooner than the others.

Buy the selected items together


Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

A teenage girl wakes up alone in a bed and breakfast in Santa Fe with no memory of who she is or how she got there. The innkeeper explains that the man who brought her there said he was her father. But the one thing she knows for sure is that he is not--and that she must flee before he returns. Taking his jacket, money, and gun, she hikes into the surrounding mountains; in an unlikely scenario that only a writer as talented as Grimes can make plausible, she survives the harsh winter and even flourishes, seeking solace in the company of coyotes she frees from their illegal traps. When she reemerges from the wilderness a few months later, seeking to unravel the mystery of who she is, she walks into the life of 14-year-old Mary Dark Hope, a lonely orphan who becomes her ally and companion. Together they track the stranger who abducted her, who holds the key to the secret of her identity--the man she knows only as "Daddy."

The thrilling odyssey that takes the two girls into the murky world of illegal dogfights, hunting, and wild-animal profiteers culminates in a dramatic confrontation, but it is the brilliantly realized characters rather than the plot that capture the reader's imagination and keep the pages turning. Another tour de force for Grimes, and a cause for celebration for her many fans. --Jane Adams --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Publishers Weekly

Engaging adolescent Mary Dark Hope, who appeared in Rainbow's End, returns in this uneven thriller/animal-rights polemic. After Mary befriends Andi, a teenage amnesiac who releases trapped animals in New Mexico's Sandia Mountains, the two girls head after a mysterious man who Andi thinks may have kidnapped her and knows her identity. Conveniently, the orphaned Mary has a bank account, a car, her dead sister's driver's license and gullible caregivers. The girls easily encounter garrulous informants along the way, finding a friend and protector in Reuel, a salt-of-the-earth dropout who knows everyone in Salmon, Idaho, where they've tracked their quarry. Once Andi identifies Harry Wine, a river expedition outfitter, as her abductor, the book shifts into a series of predictable episodes that show unthinking people gruesomely mistreating animals and that reveal the arrogant Wine's vile nature. Mary and Andi rescue an abused dog, go white-water rafting, spy on a "canned hunt" for endangered animals. In a violent scene near the book's end, Andi confronts Wine, then disappears. Although Grimes writes movingly of the plight of maltreated animals and gracefully evokes the beauty of the American West, many scenes are too long and aimless. Most of the characters are stereotypes, their individual motivations hard to discern. Andi's disappearance is especially puzzlingAlike the Lone Ranger, she stirs up the populace and vanishes, leaving the cleanup to others. This is not a Richard Jury book, and fans will miss him. Rights, Peter Lampack Agency.
Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: NAL (March 1, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0451409132
  • ISBN-13: 978-0451409133
  • Product Dimensions: 5.3 x 0.8 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 2.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (56 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #982,820 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Martha Grimes is the bestselling author of twenty-one Richard Jury novels, as well as the novels Dakota and Foul Matter, among others. Her previous two Jury books, The Old Wine Shades and Dust, both appeared on the New York Times bestseller list.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

26 of 26 people found the following review helpful By Nat on October 30, 1999
Format: Hardcover
In my opinion, this book should be reissued or marketed to the young adult audience. When reading the book I immediately felt I was reading young adult material. As the book progressed this feeling did not change as I expected it to. I only kept reading because I was also curious as to Andi's history. I am a librarian so I have threrefore read many books geared to this audience.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 12, 1999
Format: Hardcover
Grimes's writing style is as smooth as ever, but I couldn't get past the premise of two teenagers galavanting across the U.S. like Thelma and Louise. Andi had already been preyed upon once; Mary had seen the dark side of life with the death of her sister. Am I to believe these two intelligent young women would just hit the road, chasing a child molester, as if they were going on Spring Break? And if the think-tank doctor was such a genius, how could he let Andi and Mary wander off after hearing that horrible story. It just doesn't wash.
Also, although I am sympathetic to animal rights issues, this book covered too many-trapping, coyote population control, dogfights, crooked vets, and canned hunts. It would have been better to focus one or two issues, because in the end, the overwhelming amount of controversial topics detracted from all of them.
I didn't expect to see Richard Jury in this novel, so I wasn't disappointed in that respect. But I did feel this novel was rushed and not as finely crafted as some of her others.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
17 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Diane Neal on May 28, 2000
Format: Paperback
If you love Martha Grimes, don't read this book. The subject matter (cruelty to animals and people)is certainly worthy of being written about even though I wish this book had never been published. It's very hard to get past some of the completely unbelievable plot points and editing mistakes (e.g. drinking a "pint" of beer in Montana, please). I love Martha Grimes, both the Richard Jury novels and her other fiction works, but she should have used a pseudonym on Biting the Moon. I was mad that I wasted two days reading this one.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Reviews No More on January 11, 2006
Format: Paperback
I'm glad I read this book before its predecessor, Rainbow's End, because I might have believed all the amazingly bad reviews here. Inspector Jury needs to be placed before a jury and found guilty for being boring.

True, I found both Andie and Mary a bit too mature for teenagers, and they both got lucky too often, but I found their special and fast bond as two eccentric loners touching and unique as they travelled together saving animals and hunting down the man who'd abducted Andie many months before. Agreed, you had to suspend some disbelief, but the unfinished business of Mary not checking up on Andie after their time together was through had a distinctly sweet romantic aire that had nothing to do with any conventional love story, and I liked that she didn't persue it further. I didn't even know about the unfair and outrageous antics of canned hunting until discovering this book, and loved these characters all the more for trying to save animals, plus righting the wrongs of human injustices where they could. Full of interesting characters and unpredictable twists and turns, I saw this story as a bit of escapist heaven combined with elements of an author who is definitely a dreamer of unconventionally romantic tales. Animal welfare is also a big deal in my book, so I really enjoyed the adventures of Andie and Mary. Who was Andie? We never really find out, but we know that Mary is a better person for having known her. A positive tale that dares the reader not to care about its many characters and causes, I found it irresistibly hard to put down.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 4, 1999
Format: Hardcover
I am a loyal Grimes reader, but was very disappointed by this book. I had to force myself to finish it. I felt that the plot was uninteresting and unrealistic. I hope her next book restores my faith.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 12, 1999
Format: Hardcover
I suppose I've become too addicted to Richard Jury and his coterie of eccentric friends, but this book certainly leaves a lot to be desired. Not only that, but this is the third mystery I have read recently (the others are Moon Music by Faye Kellerman and Black Notice by Patricia Cornwell) that have a shape-changer/werewolf subject. What's the deal ladies?
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Arthur J. Engler on August 8, 1999
Format: Hardcover
I agree with all the others who opine that Ms. Grimes should stick with what/who she knows best -- Richard Jury and company. As others have said, this book was pretty vague in many details and I didn't get the sense of knowing the characters that I prefer. Also, the ending was completely unsatisfying for me!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By MacGeezer on March 22, 2003
Format: Paperback
two teenage girls take on amnesia, sexual perversion, dog fighting, white water rafting and canned hunts coming out on top every time in a story that defines the unbelievable; and while it's nice to see Mary Dark Hope again (she was the only interesting character in "Rainbows End") nothing else about the book is at all interesting if your IQ exceeds double digits and you are above the age of fifteen
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
Biting the Moon
This item: Biting the Moon
Price: $11.50
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?