A Bitter Feast: A Bill Smith/Lydia Chin Novel and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more

A Bitter Feast: A Bill Smith/Lydia Chin Novel (Bill Smith/Lydia Chin Novels)
 
 
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.

Used - Acceptable | See details
Sold by ToyBurg.
Access codes and supplements are not guaranteed with used items.
 
   
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Start reading A Bitter Feast on your Kindle in under a minute.

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

A Bitter Feast: A Bill Smith/Lydia Chin Novel (Bill Smith/Lydia Chin Novels) [Mass Market Paperback]

S. J. Rozan
4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)


Available from these sellers.


‹  Return to Product Overview

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

There's lots of action, great food, and social insight into the attitudes of various generations of immigrants in S.J. Rozan's fifth book in her superlative Lydia Chin-Bill Smith series. There's also a remarkable moment when Lydia's mother actually admits that she approves of the way her daughter does her job. Mrs. Chin has always hated the fact that Lydia's work as a private detective puts her in danger and in the company of men, like Smith, who don't make suitable husbands. But when Lydia refuses to knuckle under to the demands of a venerable Chinatown patriarch, her mother astonishes her (and us) by praising her "professional manner"--and then goes on to give her a clue that helps her unravel a mystery involving the smuggling of people and drugs. With each novel, Rozan alternates the narrative focus between Lydia Chin and Bill Smith, and this time it's Lydia's turn to take center stage. She uses her ethnicity and acting talent to work undercover as a dim sum waitress at the Dragon Garden (where four illegal aliens have disappeared) and her deep roots in New York's Chinatown to note and comment on subtle changes in the power structure as new Fukienese-speaking immigrants replace the old Cantonese. She and Smith also move their complicated personal relationship forward a notch and consume vast amounts of wonderful food--Chinese, Jewish, even a homemade meatloaf--in a story that manages to satisify all the senses. Previous Chin-Smith outings in paperback: China Trade, Concourse, Mandarin Plaid, and No Colder Place. --Dick Adler --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Publishers Weekly

While lots of amazing events happen in Rozan's fifth book in her superlative Lydia Chin/Bill Smith series, none surprises more than the moment when Lydia's mother actually admits that she approves of the way her daughter does her job. Mrs. Chin has always hated that her daughter's work as a PI puts her in danger and bad company, namely that of men, like Bill, who don't make suitable husbands. But when Lydia refuses to knuckle under to the demands of a Chinatown patriarch, her mother astonishes her by praising her "professional manner"?and then gives her a clue that helps her unravel a mystery involving the smuggling of people and drugs. Since Bill took center stage in the Shamus Award-winning Rozan's last book, No Colder Place (1997), this time it's Lydia's turn in the spotlight. Working undercover as a dim sum waitress at the Dragon Garden, where four illegal aliens have disappeared, Lydia calls upon her deep roots in New York's Chinatown to note and comment on subtle changes in the power structure as new Fukienese-speaking immigrants replace the old Cantonese. She and Bill also move their personal relationship forward a notch and consume vast amounts of wonderful food?Chinese, Jewish, even a homemade meatloaf?in a story that manages to satisify all the senses.
Copyright 1998 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Booklist

Last seen in No Colder Place , PIs Lydia Chin and Bill Smith return in their fifth adventure. Rozan--the only other woman besides Sue Grafton to have won the Shamus Award for Best Novel--has built a marvelous series around these two characters. Each installment has alternated between the voice of Lydia, a Chinese American born and raised in New York's Chinatown, and Bill, a veteran with a past he'd rather forget. This one focuses on the complexities of power in Chinatown that Lydia encounters when hired to find four missing waiters who all worked at the Dragon Garden, a popular dim sum restaurant owned by one of the community's Cantonese power brokers. The job leads Lydia and Bill to the conflict between the older Cantonese and the newer Fukienese immigrants, discovery of illegal aliens imported for cheap labor to prevent unionization of Chinese restaurants, the deadly business of drug running, and possible U.S. government involvement in smuggling dissidents out of mainland China. Quite a brew indeed, and one that Rozan handles with skill and verve in the most complex plot she has yet written. Lydia and Bill's relationship provides the intriguing subplot in what may be the best of this uniformly excellent, well written, and entertaining series. If you've missed the first four, now is the time to get acquainted with one of the best PI duos in contemporary mystery fiction. Stuart Miller --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

"Smart, crisp writing...The rich sights, sounds and textures of daily life in Chinatown are a sumptuous feast for jaded palates." --Marilyn Stasio, The New York Times Book Review

"You couldn't ask for better company than Lydia." --Seattle Times/Post-Intelligencer

"A marvelous series...One of the best P.I. duos in contemporary mystery fiction." --Booklist (starred review)

"Superlative...a story that manages to satisfy all the senses." --Publishers Weekly (starred review)

"Engaging, energetic Lydia is good company." --Philadelphia Inquirer

"Rozan skillfully measures out the layers of double-dealing, keeping her plot just twisty enough to spin it out with consummate professionalism. If you still don't know Lydia and Bill, you'll never have a better chance to meet them." --Kirkus (starred review)

From the Publisher

"Smart, crisp writing...The rich sights, sounds and textures of daily life in Chinatown are a sumptuous feast for jaded palates." --Marilyn Stasio, The New York Times Book Review

"You couldn't ask for better company than Lydia." --Seattle Times/Post-Intelligencer

"A marvelous series...One of the best P.I. duos in contemporary mystery fiction." --Booklist (starred review)

"Superlative...a story that manages to satisfy all the senses." --Publishers Weekly (starred review)

"Engaging, energetic Lydia is good company." --Philadelphia Inquirer

"Rozan skillfully measures out the layers of double-dealing, keeping her plot just twisty enough to spin it out with consummate professionalism. If you still don't know Lydia and Bill, you'll never have a better chance to meet them." --Kirkus (starred review)

About the Author

S. J. Rozan is the author of many critically acclaimed novels and has won most of crime fiction's greatest honors, including the Edgar, Shamus, Anthony, Macavity, and Nero Awards. She lives in New York. 

From AudioFile

Caught in the cross fire between union organizers and rival rest-aurateurs, private detective Lydia Chin is trying to track down four missing Chinese restaurant workers. Although the recording is uninspired, the story itself is satisfying as it takes Chin and her sometimes-partner, Bill Smith, through a world of illegal aliens, drug smuggling and the Chinatown bureaucratic jungle. Agnes Herrmann puts on an effective Chinese accent, but the normal voice she employs for narration and for non-ethnic characters comes out sounding nasal, on edge, and slightly whiny. Chin's character has a fun, spontaneous quality, which doesn't come through in Herrmann's reading. Despite the mismatch, BITTER FEAST makes for an exciting and edifying listen. S.E.S. (c) AudioFile, Portland, Maine --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
‹  Return to Product Overview