Bitter Harvest and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $40.00
  • Save: $7.82 (20%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Acceptable | Details
Sold by giggil
Condition: Used: Acceptable
Comment: Heavy wear, and has some writing or highlighting.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Bitter Harvest: A Chef's Perspective on the Hidden Danger in the Foods We Eat and What You Can Do About It Hardcover – June 13, 2000


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$32.18
$7.01 $0.01


NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Kindle Business Book Daily Deal
Today only, Dennis Bakke's "The Decision Maker" is on sale for only $1.99. Shop now

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 290 pages
  • Publisher: Routledge; 1st edition (June 13, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0415922275
  • ISBN-13: 978-0415922272
  • Product Dimensions: 1 x 6.3 x 9.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #942,368 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

Trained by European chefs who favored exotic dishes, Cooper (A Woman's Place Is in the Kitchen) spent two decades preparing restaurant meals "without accounting for seasonality or a sense of place." After attending the Chefs Collaborative 2000 Conference five years ago, she was inspired to rethink many of her assumptions and food choices. Not only did she begin to seek out locally grown, organic produce, she became increasingly interested in the pernicious role of agribusiness in controlling and altering our food supply. Here she discusses what she has learned about the use of pesticides and hormones in agriculture, the addition of harmful chemicals to processed foods, and the loss of biodiversity through the bioengineering of seeds and plants. To counter these environmentally damaging trends, Cooper shows how farmers, cooks, and concerned-citizen groups are striving to grow and market food that is sustainable, safe, and healthy. An appendix of resources offers the reader ways to learn more about sustainable agriculture and environmentally sound practices. Recommended for public and academic libraries.DIlse Heidmann, San Marcos, TX
Copyright 2000 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Review

Bitter Harvest is a passionate, engaging text that exhibits years of research and fact-gathering. -- Gastronomica, Fall 2001
Part exposé, part consumer guidebook, this carefully researched and readable work highlights the connections between the food we eat and the conditions of its production. In doing so, it offers practical advice on how the average shopper can contribute toward both a healthier food supply and a more sustainable environment. -- E (Westport), Allentown Call, James E. McWilliams
Recommended for public and academic libraries. -- Library Journal
To counter these environmentally damaging trends, Cooper shows how farmers, cooks, and concerned-citizen groups are striving to grow and market food that is sustainable, safe, and healthy. An appendix of resources offers the reader ways to learn moe about sustainable agriculture and environmentally sound practices. Recomended for public and academic libraries. -- Ilse Heidmann, San Marcos, TX
Bitter Harvest offers some fascinating reading about the history of agriculture and the politics of food and power. -- The Oregonian
Cooper. . . is a passionate advocate of small-scale, sustainable farming (which she defines as a method that returns to the earth as much as it consumes) and a sharp critic of agribusiness (large-scale industrial farming). . . Her vision of the future is one where sustainable farming would adopt the best of emerging technologies and strictly control the introduction of potentially harmful practices. -- --Kirkus Reviews, 15 June 2000
A concerned chef puts the food supply under scrutiny and comes up with some bad news about what's wrong with teh way we're growing our food and eating it too...Cooper, formerly executive chef at the Putney Inn in Vermont and currently a consultant for the Culinary Institute of America, is a passionate advocate of small-scale, sustainable farming(which she defines as a method that returns to the earth as much as it consumes) and a sharp critic of agribusiness (large-scale industrial farming)...Her vision of the future is one where sustainable farming would adopt the best of emerging techinologies and strictly control the introduction of potentially harmful practices. -- Kirkus Reviews

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

19 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Rich Allan on February 18, 2003
Format: Hardcover
Bitter Harvest is a wonderful book. It highlights the importance of natural foods vs. the artificial foods we eat. However, this is a distinction NOT between junk food and vegetables, but agribusiness vegetables and local organic vegetables.
It turns out that, in search of the maximum profit, the massive agribusinesses engage in pratices that make vegetables much less healthy, and, in some cases, toxic.
Since allowing land to fallow and regain its nutrients reduces profits that could be generated from using that land, agribusinesses use the same land over and over again, and pump it full of chemicals to try to restore the nutritional content of the soil. This is not some wild claim, it is simply how agribusiness works according to their own information.
As a result, many vegetables are becoming less healthy and less nutritional. For instance, a USDA report comparing American broccoli between 1975 and 1997 shows that it has decreased in many important nutrients: broccoli in 1997 had 53% less calcium, 20% less iron, 38% less Vit A, 17% less Vit C, 35% less thiamin, 48% less riboflavin, and 29% less Niacin than 1975 broccoli. Additionally, food that is transported loses nutrients over time. Our vegetables travel an average of 1500 miles.
Unfortunately, thanks to NAFTA and GATT, our vegetables can be toxic. Mexico currently does not ban at least 6 pesticides that are banned due to health effects in the USA. Why does this matter to us? We get most of our off-season vegetables from Mexico: 97% of tomatoes, 93% of our cucumbers, 95% of our squash, 99% eggplant, and 85% of our strawberries. We are eating the poisons Mexico allows in its food.
The news is not all bad, and this book is largely a celebration of life, food, and nature.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 24, 2001
Format: Hardcover
Thank you Ann Cooper and Lisa Holmes! If you really believe "you are what you eat", this book may scare you into ACTION! This book was suggested to me by a parent of one of my son's friends, and I am so glad it was. Though sometimes "text bookish", this compilation of information really makes you stop and think about what you eat and what we feed our families. I found the historical information to be very insightful and the suggestions for how to offer healthier choices were terrific. The resources listed in the back of the book were nuts and bolts suggestions that answered the question, "now what do I do?" With recent "Mad Cow Disease" scares, and ever increasing rates of cancer, heart disease, etc. this is a fabulous resource for helping people to think about small ways to make changes in what we put in our bodies every day. READ IT!!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Carrie Balkcom on July 4, 2000
Format: Hardcover
This book should be read by every parent in America who goes to the grocery store and buys food. We have become a nation of "put it in the basket" buyers. This book cuts to the core of what is wrong with American food. KUDOS for a job well done.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Mathew Wienbar on February 15, 2008
Format: Hardcover
This book focuses on sustainability, safety, and nutrition in the food we eat. There are a lot of players that have an impact on the food that shows up in the grocery store: agribusiness, the government, seed companies, chemical companies, and farmers. This book focuses on the interplay of these groups and the impact they have on our food. Organic farming is featured heavily throughout.

Some highlights include:

Turkeys are now bred to be so large that they can no longer mate and need to be artificially inseminated.

Chicken is consistently infected with salemolla and the "solution" in your bagged chicken contains bleach.

Beef cattle are fed antibiotics, not because they're sick, but so they grow faster.

RGBH hormone is being used to reduce corporate costs and put small milkers out of business.

Nutrition in fruits and vegetables has been declining since the 70's because of corporate farm practices.

Out of season produce is burning up tons of fossil fuels and imported produce may be treated with pesticides that are illegal in the United States.

A lot of good political stuff here about the food industry. Giants like Monsanto and ADM throw their weight around with resulting negative impact on the safety and nutrition of our food.

This was written in 2000 when the national organic standards were still in a state of flux. Since then they have passed, it would be interesting to hear weather or not the author finds them satisfactory.

Recommended for Parents, teachers, students, farmers, or anyone with an interest in the food industry.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?