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Comment: Minor if any shelf wear Pages are clean and intact Tight spine LIBRARY WITHDRAW COPY IN LIKE NEW CONDITION!!! library stickers/inventory marks may be present
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Black Bottle Hardcover – August 21, 2012


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 448 pages
  • Publisher: Tor Books (August 21, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0765325179
  • ISBN-13: 978-0765325174
  • Product Dimensions: 1.3 x 6.3 x 9.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,098,861 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

“Huso pushes the conventions of epic fantasy to their limits in this tale that that is not quite horror, not quite fantasy, and much more than both. Reminiscent of the novels of China Miéville and Glen Cook, this should appeal to fans of steampunk and epic fantasy.”—Library Journal on Black Bottle

“Macabre and magnificent, as enthralling as it is astonishing.”—Kirkus Reviews (starred review) on The Last Page

"Huso adroitly mixes technology and fantasy elements in a twisty story that will appeal to fans of thorough world-building and sneaky surprises."—Publishers Weekly on The Last Page


"A first novel of unusual scope, power, and imagination… I loved it."—Glen Cook, author of The Black Company on The Last Page

"Huso’s visionary new world will enchant you, if you let it."—RT BookReviews on The Last Page

About the Author

ANTHONY HUSO was born in Minnesota and has lived in Asia, Europe, and around the United States. When not writing, he is a video game designer. Titles he has worked on include Call of Duty: World at War and Boom Blox Bash Party. He currently lives and works in Austin, Texas, with his wife and daughters.


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Customer Reviews

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See all 7 customer reviews
It's obvious the author didn't write it.
jimavane
I'm sure that there are other readers like me who want to read something different and want to be entertained with shocking and surprising details.
"Seregil of Rhiminee"
The characters right out of a Rod Serling nightmare from the last book pale in comparison to the bizzarity (seems appropriate) of these characters.
wbentrim

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Clay Kallam on May 20, 2013
Format: Hardcover
Finishing Anthony Huso's "Black Bottle" (Tor, $27.99, 416 pages) was a tribute to pure porfessionalism - or simple stupidity, I'm not sure which.

First, a spoiler alert, if you read "The Last Page" and planned on finishing the duology that wraps up in "Black Bottle", stop reading here.

OK, here's the deal: Everybody dies. Well, OK, two people survive (though they are no longer breathing, whatever that might mean), but they are stranded in a world with no one but them, which seems like a pretty bleak denouement. Then again, compared to what happens to everyone else - and I do mean everyone - parent and child living out their lives alone is a shining city on a hill.

Oh yes, everyone else. Most of them (numbering in the tens of millions on this unnamed planet) die from a horrible plague that turns them into a kind of fish, but only with lots of pain and blood. Those that dodge the awful agony of the plague are eaten alive by horrid demons from the deep (who also die), described, naturally, in loving detail by the sesquipedalian Huso, who delights in every crunch of bone, every spattered drop of blood and every pointless and empty death. Others are burned alive, or poisoned, or suffocated - but none, of course, die in bed surrounded by loved ones.

In between the gore and destruction, Huso's plot involving the oddly named Caliph Howl - though perhaps it's just a riff on the king of pain, which is certainly justifiable since the least of his suffering is being killed and brought back to life with full memory of the death - and his vain attempts to figure out his no-longer-human and now immortal lover while at the same time saving the world.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Lisa (Starmetal Oak Reviews) on May 4, 2013
Format: Hardcover
Warning: spoilers for The Last Page but not for Black Bottle.

Black Bottle started off really, really well. We are thrust back into the world of Caliph and Sena, after Caliph had miraculously been brought back to life at the end of The Last Page. I was revved up to see more of this twisty, dark universe filled with monsters, witches, blood magic and sometimes, horrors. It seemed that some of my concerns of the first book had already been taken care of: the plot was moving fast, the prose a lot easier to follow and also the inclusion of another female character, Taelin Rae. I was hooked.

However, after a couple hundred pages or so, I ran into some other issues. Let me just say that my relationship with this duology has been one of love-hate. While reading I am equally mesmerized and frustrated by the descriptions, the ideas and the imagery Huso thinks up. On the one had everything is very ethereal, fantastical and imaginative. On the other, it's confusing, often too abstract and wild. The story unfolds in many dreams and drug-induced visions. We are barely given any explanations or information about what is going on and how (I didn't realize they were drug-induced visions until near the end). Sena is on her mission to save the world (from what?) and Caliph is chasing her for much of the novel after she does some pretty heinous things. I just didn't always understand the motivations, the dangers or the purpose of any of it. I read pretty voraciously until the very end, hoping for some kind of revelation that we never quite get.

I'm not sure how to recommend this series. It's a unique, haunting, and spellbinding experience. It's also frustrating, very long and in need of a good glossary.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By wbentrim VINE VOICE on January 18, 2013
Format: Hardcover
Black Bottle by Anthony Huso
This is the sequel to Last Page which I read and reviewed on Azure Dwarf. This was one of those books that makes you wonder if your own imagination was some how truncated. Huso paints a Timothy Leary type civilization with overtones of steam-punk. Caliph Howl is called to lead his nation and finds himself surrounded by treachery in the first book. The second book takes up with Sena, his wife. It explores her journey down a very bizarre rabbit hole.

Huso's rich environment is carried further in this book. The characters right out of a Rod Serling nightmare from the last book pale in comparison to the bizzarity (seems appropriate) of these characters. Huso has an amazing grasp of florid detail. He paints nightmarishly detailed scenes.

Machiavellian is how I described the Last Page and frankly this is even more convoluted. I enjoyed The Last Page. This book lost me. I lost my connection to the protagonist and never regained it. I suspect those who revel in the absurd and favor the outer limits will enjoy it.

I didn't.
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4 of 6 people found the following review helpful By "Seregil of Rhiminee" on September 6, 2012
Format: Hardcover
Anthony Huso's The Last Page was one of my favourite books of 2010, because it was an original and fresh piece of new weirdish dark fantasy. That's why I could hardly wait to get my hands on Black Bottle. (It didn't take long for me to read this book, because it was an excellent and delightfully weird book.)

Black Bottle is a an entertaining and complex sequel to The Last Page. It tells what happens to the characters after the first book's shocking and surprising ending. In the first book the author took the story to new heights of weirdness, which was very nice, because it's fascinating to read about weird things. He does similar things in this book and suprises his readers with new twists and morbid horrors.

I think it's very brave of Tor Books to publish a new weirdish dark fantasy book for intelligent readers, because the markets are full of epic fantasy stories. It's wonderful that the publisher has had enough courage to publish this kind of fantasy, because there are several readers who want to read dark and weird fantasy. As a long time fan of dark fantasy, horror and weird fiction stories I am very pleased with Tor Books for publishing The Last Page and Black Bottle, because we need complex fantasy stories like these (general fantasy is often too easy and avoids complex plot structures, but dark and weird fantasy offers more food for the brains).

This book will delight fans of new weirdish dark fantasy and weird fantasy. It will also be of interest to readers who want to read something different. As many readers may have noticed, it's difficult to find originality in today's crowded fantasy markets, because mainstream fantasy tends to rule the markets.
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