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The Black Chicago Renaissance (New Black Studies Series) Paperback


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The Black Chicago Renaissance (New Black Studies Series) + The Muse in Bronzeville: African American Creative Expression in Chicago, 1932-1950 + Black Metropolis: A Study of Negro Life in a Northern City
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Product Details

  • Series: New Black Studies Series
  • Paperback: 272 pages
  • Publisher: University of Illinois Press; 1st Edition edition (June 25, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0252078586
  • ISBN-13: 978-0252078583
  • Product Dimensions: 10.9 x 8.4 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.7 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #495,710 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

 

"This collection reveals that 1930s-50s Chicago had enough African American artists who were born, worked, or studied there—in the applied, performing, and recording arts, social sciences, and literature—to constitute a critical mass rivaling the earlier cultural exuberance of Harlem."--Choice

"The book offers highly readable essays from scholars who tell stories about the artists -- including some Harlem Renaissance ex-parts who came to Chicago -- and the conditions that contributed to a major arts movement in the city that lasted for more than two decades."--Chicago Tribune


"A lively, useful anthology of ten critical essays on Chicago's remarkable upturn in black cultural politics and political culture at midcentury."--Journal of Illinois History



 
"This landmark anthology, the first to comprehensively gather work on the Black Chicago Renaissance, ratifies that topic's ascendant stature within recent African American and American historical study. A tremendous achievement for its editors and contributors, and an indispensable scholarly resource for generations to come."--Adam Green, author of Selling the Race: Culture, Community, and Black Chicago, 1940–1955

About the Author

 

 
Darlene Clark Hine is Board of Trustees Professor of African American Studies, professor of history, and chair of African American Studies at Northwestern University. John McCluskey Jr. is professor emeritus of African American and African Diaspora Studies at Indiana University.

More About the Author

Erik S. Gellman is an Associate Professor of History at Roosevelt University in Chicago. He earned his B.A. from Bates College and Ph.D. in History from Northwestern University. Specializing in the 19th and 20th Century United States, Gellman's research interests include African American and working-class history, social movements, and comparative ethnic and racial studies.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Since the Harlem Renaissance, New York has been considered the unofficial capital of black America. However, that designation might be undeserving when one reflects upon Chicago's considerable contributions not only culturally, but socially and politically.

For example, the Windy City sent its first African-American to Congress sixteen years before the Big Apple which only elected Adam Clayton Powell, Jr. in 1944. Furthermore, half of the six black U.S. Senators in history represented Illinois, and I know I don't have to tell you that President Obama hails from Chicago.

An impressive history lesson and compendium of fascinating factoids proving that the so-called Second City need not take a back seat to New York, at least when discussing the achievements of its African-American intelligentsia.

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