Trade in your item
Get a $3.80
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

The Black Image in the White Mind: The Debate on Afro-American Character and Destiny, 1817-1914 Paperback – March 15, 1987


See all 6 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback, March 15, 1987
$52.73 $11.38
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
$20.00

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 343 pages
  • Publisher: Wesleyan; 1st edition (March 15, 1987)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0819561886
  • ISBN-13: 978-0819561886
  • Product Dimensions: 7.9 x 5.5 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #160,255 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

“A remarkably dispsionable and perceptive treatment of the complex pattern of 19th century American race-thinking…An indispensable study for all students of America culture.” —Anne C. Loveland, Civil War History

“A well-researched and highly readable account of the ‘development of intellectualized racist theory and ideology’ as it evolved from the beginning of the 19th century until the end of World War I…The book is a history of ideas, but also a study of how those ideas were ‘espoused and applied by race-conscious intellectuals, pseudointellectuals, publicists, and politicians.’ An essencial holding for all undergraduate and graduate libraries.”—Library Journal

“Trenchant, interesting and well-written… this volume should establish itself as indispensable and invaluable reading, as a starting point for anyone interested in America’s failure to absorb a large minority of a different color. In his ability to penetrate the surface of racist theory, his very thoughtful analysis and categorization of racist thought, with his consideration of intellectualized racism’s influence on policy, Fredrickson has provided us with a better understanding of the race problem in America.” —Robert L. Harris, Jr., Journal of Negro History

Review

“This important book should be used in southern history, black history, intellectual history, and 19th-century American history. No other book provides an adequate substitute.” (C. Vann Woodward, Yale University)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
5 star
2
4 star
2
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 4 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on December 18, 2000
Format: Paperback
Fredrickson defines racism as a reasoned theory that posits the "innate and permanent inferiority of nonwhites" (xvii). He argues that racism in some form has plagued American thought throughout the nation's history, and in this volume he traces the different forms it has taken in the period from 1817 to 1914. He thus arranges his study chronologically, progressing methodically through the nineteenth century. Fredrickson begins by showing that the underlying arguments for the colonization movements were based on the recognition of white prejudice in American society. Colonizationitsts argued that black people would never have the opportunity to integrate into the society because of deeply ingrained racial prejudices. The abolitionists answered this position by arguing that whites should be able to overcome their prejudice and achieve the ideal of Christian brotherhood. Then, as more abolitionists based their attack on moral grounds, proponents of slavery searched for ideological justification for their position and argued for the innate racial inequality and permanent inferiority of the black slaves. From this emerged a Herrenvolk democracy in which the creation of a permanent underclass (slaves in this case) protected the radical equality of the higher class (whites). Scientific theories emerge in the 1840s and 1850s to support the position of the innate inferiority of the slaves and gave rise to the theory of polygenesis which holds that only whites descended from Adam, while God created blacks as an inferior species. Romantic racialism also emerged at the same time moving focus from seeming social and intellectual deficiencies of black people and emphasizing their lightheartedness and willingness to serve, qualities of natural Christians.Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Jeffrey Leach HALL OF FAME on December 4, 2003
Format: Paperback
George Fredrickson's book, "The Black Image in the White Mind," is an intellectual history dealing with the rise of formalized racial ideologies in nineteenth century America. The author argues that these anti-black intellectual concepts, far from forming in a vacuum, arose in concert with other significant trends occurring in the American political, economic, and social arena. Moreover, Fredrickson points out the significant role the American North, an area not usually associated with overt racism, played in this emotionally charged discourse. Many of the ideas articulated in the North reinforced as often as they countered the extremely hostile invective circulating in the South. Most importantly, "The Black Image in the White Mind" stresses the underlying themes that all of these theories, regardless of northern or southern orientation, shared between 1817 and 1914: the author convincingly avers that every racial hypothesis assumed the idea of black inferiority, that blacks differed significantly from whites "physically, intellectually, and temperamentally," that animosity between whites and blacks was inevitable, saw miscegenation as a sublime evil, and viewed a biracial society as an impossibility best remedied by the outright removal of African-Americans from United States territory or through various forms of subordination to the dominant white society. It is not surprising this book is still a standard assignment in graduate seminars about race history.
Fredrickson begins his analysis with the emergence of the colonization movement in the 1820s and 1830s and concludes with the plight of the American black under the Progressive movement of the early twentieth century.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By ShaWashanah on December 6, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I cannot believe how much I have learned in reading this book for pleasure. I could not put it down.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By datsun on April 20, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I recommend this fine works to any one who thirsts for knowledge. George Fredrickson as only he can really makes reading and learning fun. It's a serious piece of history packed in this book, I love it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search