Black Ops and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy Used
$4.34
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Good | Details
Sold by hippo_books
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Item qualifies for FREE shipping and Prime! This item is used.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Black Ops: The Rise of Special Forces in the C.I.A., the S.A.S., and Mossad Hardcover – June 19, 2010


See all 6 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$7.25 $0.01
Best%20Books%20of%202014
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Year
Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 496 pages
  • Publisher: Pegasus; 1st edition (June 19, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1605980978
  • ISBN-13: 978-1605980973
  • Product Dimensions: 0.6 x 0.2 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.5 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 2.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,232,641 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Geraghty, an expert in the evolution of war tactics, explores the building blocks that propelled the creation of special forces wings within the American, English, and Israeli military. Geraghty begins with an examination of tactics used in two conflicts: Vietnam and Afghanistan. Initially viewed as primitive by the Americans, the Vietnamese soldiers had success because of their knowledge of the jungle terrain and their experience with militaristic infiltration of towns and villages. Geraghty then turns his attention to military veterans like Green Beret captain Charlie Beckwith, whose idea to create "a force of doers" came to him after he took part in a British SAS operation in 1962 (exhaustively detailed in Beckwith's own book, Delta Force, as well as many others). In Geraghty's comprehensive view, the evolution of secretive military might was a movement from fringe to standard operating procedure. He touches on everything from the Bay of Pigs to the Afghan drug trade, and details operations both successful and failed (some famously), but ultimately covers familiar ground. Photos. (July) (c)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Review

“Geraghty, an expert in the evolution of war tactics, explores the building blocks that propelled the creation of special forces wings within the American, English, and Israeli military. He touches on everything from the Bay of Pigs to the Afghan drug trade.” (Publishers Weekly) --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

2.0 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

19 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Yachtmaster on August 21, 2010
Format: Hardcover
The author is obviously very bright and his research for this volume is quite extensive (240 separate sources in the end notes). But, the writing is schizophrenic and contains one run-on sentence after the next. He jumps from service-to-service, conflict-to-conflict, decade-to-decade at break neck speed, often in the same paragraph. When he does slow down to give detail, it is a seemly random event. For instance, one of the most detailed accounts is of Mossad's retaliation after Berlin. But anyone who has ever seen the Hollywood movie will learn nothing new. Other more interesting exploits are barely referenced before speeding up again and moving on.

The inherent problem of course is that black ops by their very nature are highly secretive affairs and this book does little to reveal insight into all but a few truly "Black ops" missions. Instead the book spends the majority of the time focusing on the Special Forces of the US Britain and Israel.

Out of the 440 pages, the text only consists of only 250 pages. The rest of book consists of unclassified reports from Gen. McChrystal, The Committee on Foreign Relations, etc, which the author references (and are freely available to read online). They provide no insight into Black-ops, but do make several references to Special Forces and CIA missions in Afghanistan post 9/11.

The book would have been much improved by better editing. For example, chapters on the each of the three services (CIA [the author uses "The CIA" a major credibility faux pas], S.A.S. and Mossad) could have given order to the chaos
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
35 of 45 people found the following review helpful By P. Willson on June 1, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I am basing my review solely on the book's coverage of Israeli Special Ops, and can't address the US or British material. I've read a great many books and articles on Israeli Black Ops and Mossad, studied the history of Haganah, Palmach, Mossad, and IDF Units, and met a couple former IDF Spec Ops guys.

I might have been disappointed that so few pages here actually touch on Israeli black ops, but in retrospect, it's just as well. The single short chapter on Israeli Black Ops offers nothing new, is very often inaccurate and based on dubious and badly outdated sources, and manages to make a fascinating area dull. Moreover, the author's subtle anti-Zionist slant flavors his descriptions and explanations.

What I skimmed of the other parts of the book were not especially compelling or well-written, but I can't address the accuracy.

Books like this make me seriously think about getting a Kindle -- so I could save half the cost and just delete the damn thing when I realized what a waste of shelf space it is. This one's getting tossed.
4 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Thomas M. Magee on March 12, 2012
Format: Hardcover
This book does offer something for everyone; in a way. If you like this book will depend on what you want out of the book.

Half of the book is a series of stories about various special operations units over the past 40 years or so. The stories are written like what you would hear over the camp fire if you were with the unit. You won't see any explanation of what role these units played on the grand scale to win the war or there role in strategy. I think unless you are an expert in the field or have read books about the subject before you might not appreciate things.

However don't let that stop you. These tales are very interesting. You will read things I don't think you will see in other books. The author obviously has some inside connections of one kind or another. For example the author rights about how the Americans had eyes on the ground in Iran in 1979 before the raid. You do get some good little inside stories about the Israelis and the British fight in Northern Ireland. These stories will cast those events in a new light but won't change your basic understanding.

Through this collection of stories you see how these units operate. Their procedures do become apparent from these campfire stories. The raw courage and tension of the stories is inspiring, almost like a movie script. That is what made the book entertaining.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again