Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Black Physicians in the Jim Crow South, 1880-1960 Hardcover – October 1, 2003


Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover, October 1, 2003
"Please retry"
$52.64 $22.40
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 300 pages
  • Publisher: University of Arkansas Press; 1 edition (October 1, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1557287562
  • ISBN-13: 978-1557287564
  • Product Dimensions: 9.4 x 6.4 x 1.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.8 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #500,895 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Tom Ward takes us behind the Jim Crow wall in this comprehensive andmoving study of African-American physicians. . . . Vicitmized by the white medical establishment as well as the larger southern society, the black doctor was at the same time a person of influence and relative wealth inside his own community. In exploring these apparent contradictions, Ward tells us much about race and class in twentieth-century America."



--John Dittmer, author of

Local People: The Struggle for Civil Rights in Mississippi (Illinois, 1995)

About the Author

Thomas J. Ward Jr. is an assistant professor of history at Rockhurst University. He was the writer and co-producer of Mississippi Voices: A Trip through the Twentieth Century, a public radio program, and was an assistant editor for the Mississippi Oral History Project.

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
5 star
2
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 3 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By AfroAmericanHeritage on January 31, 2006
When author Thomas Ward first set out to write this history, he received a gentle but fortuitous dope-slap from one of his early interviewees. When asked what it was like to be a black physician in the South in the late 1950's, Dr. Page replied, "I don't know, but I can tell you what it was like to be Matthew Page." Thus Ward avoids the common trap of trying to homogenize experiences which were actually quite diverse.

Which is not to say he doesn't explore common threads, such as the rise and fall of black medical colleges, the policies of philanthropists and the AMA which excluded black doctors from pursuing specialities and research, their social status - or lack thereof - in the Southern black and white communities, their exclusion from residencies, medical societies, denial of hospital privileges, etc. But individual motivations, educations, and practices varied widely, as did race commitment. Class consciousness caused some to exploit members of the black lower classes (e.g.. black doctors participated in the infamous Tuskegee Syphilis Experiment up until it was shut down in the 1970's) while it motivated others to work to uplift the underprivileged black masses. Some used a medical degree as their ticket out of the South altogether, while others became the pillars of their community.

This book is a welcome addition to our growing awareness of how Jim Crow's legacy continues to have consequences for the entire nation. It's of interest to medical history buffs as well as African American studies.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
I thoroughly enjoyed and was enriched by this history. It seems to reconfirm what was occuring in my research area [History of St. Agnes Hospital and Training School for Nurses - Raleigh, NC]. Although I contacted Dr. Ward by email and got a response, I only wish I had been able to contact him before he published. I am very pleased with the amount and caliber of American medical history which he has provided. It in not just Black history. There is yet so much more to record in the history books and textbooks of today and tomorrow.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
The book was both interesting and inspirational. It's portrayal of the stuggle of black physicians is eye opening and should be required reading for all students of this country's history.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again