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Black Robes, White Justice Paperback – January 1, 1987


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Paperback, January 1, 1987
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Product Details

  • Paperback
  • Publisher: Lyle Stuart Inc. (1987)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0818405236
  • ISBN-13: 978-0818405235
  • Product Dimensions: 8.9 x 5.9 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #504,637 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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15 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Taalib A. Muhammad on January 24, 2005
Format: Paperback
As a New Yorker, I remember Judge Bruce Wright well. He was dubbed: "Cut 'em loose Bruce", because he often released arrested citizens without their having to post bail money. Mr. Wright upheld the law that bail is not to be used as a punishment, but only as a guarantee that the accused party return to court to face the charges against he/she. This infuriated the "powers-that-be". The fact that Judge Wright is a Black man, and many of those who came before him were also Black people, swayed the media to portray his actions as racially motivated, as opposed to his acknowledgement of the law. His book superbly reflects the blatant inequitableness of the criminal justice system and how it is purposely designed to work against Blacks and other people of color. His personal experiences, as a sitting judge, lend great credence to his analogy and conclusions concerning the legal system. Wright fearlessly gives names and elaborates on instances wherein he witnessed and experienced bias in the system. This book is not written in "textbook" fashion, provides some humorous irony and is very informative. Add it to your library.
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Hammad S. T on February 2, 2004
Format: Paperback
This book is an eye opener. It give you the truth behind the justice system from the perpective of a Sumpreme Court Judge who exposed the racism in the court system in New York. I never heard of Bruce Wright and happen I purchased this book. I have a lot of respect for the author.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Easy Rider VINE VOICE on October 18, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
At the time this book was written, it was considered shocking: A black judge clearly stating the racism that existed in New York's judicial system. Bruce Wright saw first-hand the racist manner in that judges were assigned to cases, to neighborhoods. He was upset with the system, and became very lenient with the perpetrators who appeared in front of his court. Hence the nickname "Turn 'em loose Bruce". A great look at a very different time in New York City.
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7 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Rebo Johnson on February 23, 2006
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I'm still reading this book. First time reading a book like this.This is one of the greatest. I recommend this book to be added to your library. It's gives truthful information of the legal system concerning the racism of blacks in the court system.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Bruce Wright was appointed to the bench in 1970, by Mayor John Lindsay. It was the era of "tokenism," and he was a token Black judge. But Wright pulled no punches, on or off the bench. He saw two standards of justice being meted out by his fellows, and spoke his mind, which made enemies, not friends.

Some of the things he experienced personally are almost inconceivable today. He was refused admission to Princeton because he was Black. Once in an examining room in an ER he heard the nurse say: "Hurry doctor, there is a sick judge in there!" The doctor entered, looked at Wright, lying on a gurney in a three-piece suit, then looked at the white derelict in the next bed, drooling and hallucinating. He walked over to the derelict and asked: "How are we feeling, judge?" Around the time Wright became a judge he had a meeting with McGeorge Bundy, and the doorman in Bundy's building insisted he use the service elevator.

What has not changed is the two-tiered justice system. My edition of Black Robes, White Justice was published in 1989. Wright saw things growing worse, not better. Time has proved him right.
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