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Black Tickets: Stories Paperback – September 11, 2001


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Vintage; Reprint edition (September 11, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0375727353
  • ISBN-13: 978-0375727351
  • Product Dimensions: 8.3 x 5.1 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #609,363 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Brilliant... Phillips is a virtuoso."
--Chicago Tribune Book World

"Extraordinary... Phillips shines brightly... This is a sweetheart of a book."
--John Irving, The New York Times Book Review

"[Phillips] knows how to write about the way dreams live with us... Genius is the word for her."
--The Boston Globe

From the Inside Flap

Jayne Anne Phillips's reputation-making debut collection paved the way for a new generation of writers. Raved about by reviewers and embraced by the likes of Raymond Carver, Frank Conroy, Annie Dillard, and Nadine Gordimer, Black Tickets now stands as a classic.

With an uncanny ability to depict the lives of men and women who rarely register in our literature, Phillips writes stories that lay bare their suffering and joy. Here are the abused and the abandoned, the violent and the passive, the impoverished and the disenfranchised who populate the small towns and rural byways of the country. A patron of the arts reserves his fondest feeling for the one man who wants it least. A stripper, the daughter of a witch, escapes from poverty into another kind of violence. A young girl during the Depression is caught between the love of her crazy father and the no less powerful love of her sorrowful mother. These are great American stories that have earned a privileged place in our literature.


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Customer Reviews

This book hasn't aged well.
teacher26
It had too much sex stuff and not really any stories to follow.
busy bee
Kudos to Phillips for experimentation, but it doesn't work.
Bibliofiend

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

20 of 22 people found the following review helpful By "pietro25744" on August 21, 2003
Format: Hardcover
I read this book the first time in 1979 when it was published. I had never read anything like it. The young characters were all from my generation, did the things I did, and took the risks I took. I was very moved by this book. The prose evoked the rather disoriented late 1970s perfectly.
I went back and read "Black Tickets" again last summer and was pleasantly surprised to discover how evocative the book still is and how moving the language is. This book is a masterpiece.
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17 of 19 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 30, 1999
Format: Paperback
These are staggeringly assured pieces and, as wonderful as her subsequent work has been, in some ways I don't think she's been able to top them. Marred only by an occasional tendency to use shocking subject matter for its own sake, these stories are punch-drunk on the precision and lush beauty of their own language. I don't think there is anyone currently writing in English whose prose is this gorgeous, or this gorgeously controlled. For me, she's like a female equivalent of Michael Ondaatje. Language to get lost in, but that never loses sight of the very human characters who use it, or whom it concerns.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Vincent Czyz on September 10, 2012
Format: Paperback
I first read Black Tickets nearly 20 years ago and for me, as a young writer, stories such as "Gemcrack" bordered on revelatory. I don't think I'd ever before encountered a style quite like the one I saw there--heightened prose but with considerably more polish than other practitioners of heightened prose--say Jack Kerouac or Henry Miller--had managed to pull off. I was not surprised to discover that Jayne Anne began as a poet since it was the language of Black Tickets that attracted me first and foremost
In addition to the exquisitely crafted sentences, Phillips performs a rare feat: She not only writes in several distinct styles, she has mastered them all. Most stylists--authors known for their lyrical power--have a single signature way of writing. Phillips, however, displays an impressive command of vernacular, heightened prose, naturalism, and maybe one or two varieties of writing that fall somewhere in between.
While I have new admiration for stories such as "Gemcrack," I was nearly flattened by "El Paso." The imagery, the lyricism tempered by vernacular, the rhythm--as palpable as handholds in a rock face--the dialogue, and the vortical ending (forgive the neologism, but I can't think of anything else that fits) fuse seamlessly. Here's an exemplary sentence: "The light rolling now, leaked into the dark, ripples the skin of the dark and flies fly up in loose knots; low slow buzz in corners yellowed and pulled out by the light that rolls across the surfaces of things in yellow blocks." The reader sees the light as almost solid, the dark filling corners, sees the knotty flight patterns of flies, hears their lethargic buzz, and consequently feels the dusty melancholy and intimated squalor of this room.
Read more ›
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22 of 34 people found the following review helpful By teacher26 on May 28, 2006
Format: Paperback
This book hasn't aged well. There is very little plot, very little dialogue, and very few verbs. (Seriously, there are stretches of five or six "sentences" in a row with nary a verb to be seen.) There are some beautiful gems compacted into the dense prose, but for the most part Phillips crafted chewy, chunky, unwieldy sentences that don't give much pay-off for all the work you've done to decipher them. I have a Masters in literature, I have read and understood Ulysses, but I had to give up on many of the incomprehensible lines here. "I suck you up like erasers"? What?

The subject matter has aged poorly, too. In 2006, I'm neither shocked nor intrigued by Phillips's thinly veiled alter-ego's confrontation with her mother over birth control.

I can see why reviewers at the time were struck by the promise and poetry of her work; the story "1934" has the most plot in the collection, and is quite lovely. But is she, as Nadine Gordimer wrote, "the best short-story writer since Eudora Welty"?

Umm, no.
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14 of 22 people found the following review helpful By lady detective on February 11, 2004
Format: Paperback
i was excited to read this book. the enthusiatic reviews by so many upstanding authors made me feel i was about to embark on a journey into something forceful & important. instead, i found myself barely submerged in a lot of jibberish and unfocused monologues.
there were 1 or 2 compelling stories in the book, but for the most part- i could have cared less. there wasn't anything about most of the characters that made me want to enter their worlds- i kept reading, hoping to find whatever it was the critics were raving about.
needless to say, i never found it.
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6 of 10 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 5, 2000
Format: Paperback
The stories are of two types here -- short, one page sketches that verge on being prose poems, and longer, fuller stories which still contain an elusive quality. Although critics, to a man, preferred the longer stories, I find the shorter ones equally compelling. The writing is first-rate; it is nuanced, poetic, and contains a wealth of psychological insight. I think this is Phillps's greatest accomplishment: her merging of the psychological and the political in stories that are always accessible. Those looking for pretension will find it only with reviewers who trash sophisticated story-tellers while including the (see more about me) tag at the beginning of their own reviews.
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