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Black Titan: A.G. Gaston and the Making of a Black American Millionaire Paperback – January 25, 2005


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 336 pages
  • Publisher: One World/Ballantine (January 25, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0345453484
  • ISBN-13: 978-0345453488
  • Product Dimensions: 8.3 x 5.5 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (28 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #100,960 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

“No library of American business achievement is complete without the story of Arthur G. Gaston. . . . Black Titan is a long overdue contribution to the recording of not just black history, but American history.”
—EARL G. GRAVES SR.
Chairman and CEO, Earl G. Graves Ltd.
Founder and Publisher, Black Enterprise magazine
Author of How to Succeed in Business Without Being White:
Straight Talk on Making It in America

“A. G. Gaston was there first. He succeeded when the odds seemed insurmountable. This important book traces his incredible life, from coal miner to millionaire. It is full of lessons for anyone looking to succeed in today’s business world.”
—ROBERT JOHNSON
CEO, Black Entertainment Television, Inc.

“It was my privilege to meet A. G. Gaston in Birmingham, Alabama, during the early 1970s. I was greatly inspired by his unique entrepreneurial vision and passionate belief in economic self-sufficiency. . . . This book should be read by every entrepreneur.”
—BYRON LEWIS
Chairman, Uniworld Group


From the Hardcover edition.

From the Inside Flap

The grandson of slaves, born into poverty in 1892 in the Deep South, A. G. Gaston died more than a century later with a fortune worth well over $130 million and a business empire spanning communications, real estate, and insurance. Gaston was, by any measure, a heroic figure whose wealth and influence bore comparison to J. P. Morgan and Andrew Carnegie. Here, for the first time, is the story of the life of this extraordinary pioneer, told by his niece and grandniece, the award-winning television journalist Carol Jenkins and her daughter Elizabeth Gardner Hines.

Born at a time when the bitter legacy of slavery and Reconstruction still poisoned the lives of black Americans, Gaston was determined to make a difference for himself and his people. His first job, after serving in the celebrated all-black regiment during World War I, bound him to the near-slavery of an Alabama coal mine?but even here Gaston saw not only hope but opportunity. He launched a business selling lunches to fellow miners, soon established a rudimentary bank?and from then on there was no stopping him. A kind of black Horatio Alger, Gaston let a single, powerful question be his guide: What do our people need now? His success flowed from an uncanny genius for knowing the answer.

Combining rich family lore with a deep knowledge of American social and economic history, Carol Jenkins and Elizabeth Hines unfold Gaston?s success story against the backdrop of a century of crushing racial hatred and bigotry. Gaston not only survived the hardships of being black during the Depression, he flourished, and by the 1950s he was ruling a Birmingham-based business empire. When the movement for civil rights swept through the South in the late 1950s and early 1960s, Gaston provided critical financial support to many activists.

At the time of his death in 1996, A. G. Gaston was one of the wealthiest black men in America, if not the wealthiest. But his legacy extended far beyond the monetary. He was a man who had proved it was possible to overcome staggering odds and make a place for himself as a leader, a captain of industry, and a far-sighted philanthropist. Writing with grace and power, Jenkins and Hines bring their distinguished ancestor fully to life in the pages of this book. Black Titan is the story of a man who created his own future?and in the process, blazed a future for all black businesspeople in America. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Carol Jenkins is an award-winning writer, producer and media consultant. She is a sought-after speaker and writer on issues relating to the media, specifically the participation of women and people of color; women's participation in the political and economic structures in the US; and the health of women in developing countries, particularly on the African continent.

An Emmy-winning former television journalist, she was founding president and board member of The Women's Media Center, the groundbreaking non-profit aimed at increasing coverage and participation of women in the media. In that WMC role she conceived the acclaimed Progressive Women's Voices media leadership program, and acquired and expanded the largest portfolio of women experts in the country, SheSource.

The WMC served as consultant to the award-winning documentary on sexism in the media, Miss Representation, and Ms Jenkins is interviewed in the film. Every year The WMC gives The Carol Jenkins Young Journalist Award to an accomplished media professional.

Carol Jenkins is Chair of the Board of Directors of AMREF USA. The African Medical & Research Foundation, a 55 year old organization based in Nairobi and founded as The Flying Doctors, is the largest African health NGO on the continent. AMREF operates in more than 30 countries in the delivery of services, training of a local health workforce, and providing safe water and sanitation. AMREF is winner of both The Bill and Melinda Gates Award for Global Health and The Hilton Humanitarian Prize.

As part of her international work, Ms Jenkins is a member of The Council on Foreign Relations.

In addition to continuing to serve on The Women's Media Center board, she is Chair of the Black Maternal Health Advisory Board of Women's eNews, the online international women's newspaper; member of the President's Council of Advisers at The National Council for Research on Women; a member of the Advisory Board of The Alliance of Women Film Journalists; and an Advisory board member of the Caring Economics Campaign, a project of The Center for Partnership Studies.

Ms Jenkins formerly served on the boards of The Ms Foundation for Women and The Feminist Press. She pursues her interest in the Arts as a board member of the Northern Manhattan Arts Alliance. Born into a farming family in Alabama, she is honored to serve as a member of the board of Humane Farm Animal Care, the national certifying entity for farms and retail establishments for humane treatment of animals.

Carol Jenkins is the co-author, with her daughter Elizabeth Gardner Hines, of Black Titan: A.G. Gaston and the Making of a Black American Millionaire. A biography of her uncle, it was winner of Best Non-Fiction award from the Black Caucus of The American Library Association. She was an Executive Producer of Eve Ensler's Sundance award-winning documentary, What I Want My Words to Do to You and is a contributor to the recently published book, Secrets of Powerful Women, Leading Change for a New Generation.

A recipient of both the Lifetime Achievement and International Reporting awards from the National Association of Black Journalists/NY, she holds honorary degrees from Marymount Manhattan College and The College of New Rochelle. During her reporting career she anchored WNBC-TV's evening newscast, covered presidential and mayoral politics, the release of Nelson Mandela from prison in South Africa, and hosted, on WNYW, her own daily talk show, Carol Jenkins Live.

Recent honors include the 2012 Ida B. Wells Bravery in Journalism Award from Women's eNews; inclusion in the 2012 Class of TheGrio 100 Leading African Americans; the 2009 North Star News Prize, and the 2008 Women's Equality Award from The National Council of Women's Organizations.

Customer Reviews

A.G. Gaston is the entreprenuers hero!
mediaagent
This story really made me appreciate and admire what this man went through to become who he was.
soulonice
I would highly recommend this book as required reading in American high schools.
George Herris

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

21 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Dera R Williams VINE VOICE on August 3, 2004
Format: Hardcover
We learned in Our Kind of People that there have always been rich black folk; what is shameful is our lack of exposure or knowledge of such individuals. A.J. Gaston was one of the wealthiest black men and the first black millionaire. His story has been detailed by his niece, journalist/broadcaster Carol Jenkins, and her daughter, Elizabeth Gardner Hines in Black Titan, a revealing biography that is both compelling and forthright. Gaston, who was born poor in Alabama in 1892 and raised partially by his maternal grandparents in Demopolis, then went to live with his mother, Rosie, in Birmingham where she worked as a maid for a prominent white family.

In Birmingham Gaston went to the Tuggle Institute for high school where he came in contact with Booker T. Washington who would remain one of his biggest influences. After he left high school, he supported himself with jobs such as delivering newspapers and factory work until he entered the army. It was overseas in France that he felt like a man but was brought back to reality when he returned to Jim Crow Alabama. Gaston went to work in the mines; dirty, grueling work but it was there where his entrepreneurial spirit was born. He sold his mother's catered lunches to the other miners and always being frugal, and then started a loan business. A businessman in the making, he then partnered with the Baptist church to start burial insurance and funeral businesses. Little by little these enterprises grew and when he partnered with A.L. Smith, who was already an established businessman, his ventures grew. Gaston & Smith proved to be very profitable professionally and personally when he married Smith's daughter Creola. They worked together and when she died, he married Minnie Gardner, a school teacher who came from a prominent family.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By thesavvybamalady VINE VOICE on January 20, 2004
Format: Hardcover
To say that a black man in one of the most segregated states in the Union,would rise up and become a millionaire during a time when that was not the norm,is in and of itself a miracle. The story of A.G.Gaston is little known outside of Birmingham and Alabama, but every African American should get a copy of this book and read for yourself how this man rose up and became a millionaire during Jim Crow times. Written by his neices,it is tastefully written,and a wonderful addition to anyone's library.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By soulonice on July 31, 2004
Format: Hardcover
This story really made me appreciate and admire what this man went through to become who he was. It told much more than how to get rich and stay rich. It spoke of his beginnings, his many obstacles in his path, and the ability to persevere in a time when it seemed impossible, especially in Birmingham, Alabama. It really put many things in perspective for me, and I hope other people get the honor of reading this timeless piece. I am a business major, so this was something I know I needed. The unfortunate (but not surprising one bit) thing is before this book, I had never heard of A.G. Gaston. In college, you hear about the Rockefellers, the Carnegie's, and others. I stumbled across this book when I was browsing around at the bookstore. Had it not been for that, I may have never known anything about this brillant man and the contributions he made in the Black community. I gained much more than I ever expected initially.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Angie B. on February 8, 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
So much of our American history is not taught in our schools, so when we become adults, we must self-study especially contributions of Black Americans. This account of A. G. Gaston's life by his niece and grand-niece is well-paced and informative. Gaston took advantage of every opportunity made available to him and his suberb work ethic allowed him to flourish in many business enterprises. Many of us know a lot about Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., but how many of us know A.G. Gaston was the man who bailed MLK Jr. and others out of the Birmingham jail? This is a must read. I've already ordered copies for my parents and my local library. Enjoy!
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By George Herris on October 15, 2004
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The story of A.G. Gaston is simply incredible. I purchased the book because I love to read stories
about people who have overcome impossible odds to become successful business people.
But I am also a 20th century history buff and therefore, this
book was an exceptional treat. About halfway through, I was
fantasizing about a Ken Burns documentary called, The Life And Times Of A.G. Gaston.
One quick sidebar; Check out the story of
Madame C.J. Walker, a Black woman born shortly after the Civil
war, to former slaves. She became a multi-millionaire and died
at age 52 at about the same time Mr. Gaston was returning from
WWI. She was the first self made Black female millionaire and
her story is also amazing.
A.G. Gaston was clearly from the Booker T. Washington school of
economics. He survived and thrived in an area that was arguably ground zero of the
insanely racist south, and arguably ground zero of the civil rights movement.
I refer to the area roughly bounded by Montgomery and Birmingham Alabama, and Meridian Mississippi.
It would have been easier for a Black man to become a multi-millionaire in almost any other area of the country.
I would highly recommend this book as required reading in American high schools.
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