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Black & White: The Confrontation between Reverend Fred L. Shuttlesworth and Eugene "Bull" Connor Hardcover – November 1, 2011


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Black & White: The Confrontation between Reverend Fred L. Shuttlesworth and Eugene "Bull" Connor + We've Got a Job: The 1963 Birmingham Children's March (Jane Addams Award Book (Awards))
Price for both: $27.42

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Product Details

  • Age Range: 12 - 18 years
  • Grade Level: 7 and up
  • Lexile Measure: 1150L (What's this?)
  • Hardcover: 112 pages
  • Publisher: Calkins Creek (November 1, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1590787668
  • ISBN-13: 978-1590787663
  • Product Dimensions: 10.3 x 9.3 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.5 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,017,242 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

* "For readers new to the subject, the biographies will be a vivid, informative introduction, but even those who have some familiarity with the landmark events will learn much more here. . . . A penetrating look at elemental national history." --Booklist, starred review


* "A clean, graphically interesting design abets a well-researched, engaging narrative that contributes a more nuanced view of the period than is often seen. (author's note, further reading, source notes, index)" --Kirkus Reviews, starred review


"Can stand alongside Russell Freedman's Freedom Walkers (Holiday House, 2006) and Brimner's own Birmingham Sunday (Calkins Creek, 2010) as fine examples of both civil-rights history and photo-biographies." --School Library Journal

About the Author

Larry Dane Brimner is the award-winning author of two other civil rights titles: We Are One: The Story of Bayard Rustin (Jane Addams Book Award and the Norman A. Sugarman Children's Biography Award) and Birmingham Sunday, (2011 NCTE Orbis Pictus Honor Book and the Teacher's Choice Award.) He lives in Tucson, Arizona.

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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Mimi Woodbridge on December 18, 2011
Format: Hardcover
Prolific writer Larry Dane Brimner has focused the spotlight on Fred L. Shuttlesworth, a key figure in the Civil Rights movement, and Eugene "Bull" Connor, Birmingham, Alabama's commissioner of public safety. Less well-known to young readers, these two public figures clashed in the 50s and 60s. Brimner contrasts Shuttlesworth's work with the actions of "Bull" Connor, chronicling their how their confrontations brought Birmingham to national awareness and led to major changes on the road to equality. Published by Calkins Creek, this book is graphically gorgeous, clean and clear in design, inviting young readers in with photos, letters, side notes, and more, offering a sense of the times both deep and wide. Unstinting in its exploration of both men, this book tells much about how far we've come and how far we must still go. This absorbing history has received a well-deserved starred review.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By DAC VINE VOICE on November 7, 2011
Format: Hardcover
In Brimner's latest non fiction book for young readers, he explores the confrontation between Rev. Fred L. Shuttlesworth and Eugene "Bull" Connor, in Birmingham, Alabama during the 1950's and 60's. To grab the readers attention, the author begins by mentioning the first time the KKK tired to kill Rev. Fred L. Shuttlesworth. From there Brimner gives the reader more background information from both men, starting with Rev. Shuttlesworth.

This is a wonderfully through introduction for any young reader unfamiliar with Birmingham's awful history of race relations. I appreciated that the author did not shy away from Birmingham's nickname of Bombingham. It's visually appealing with black and white photographs throughout, and some memorable quotes from both men can be found in bold on the sidebar.

"We nicknamed him (the judge) Injunctionitis Jones." remembered Fred. He issued so many injunctions against the NAACP and the black struggle that many Negroes believed white "officials could ask Jones to issue an injunction against the sunshine and he would do it.

Black&White is written in an engaging matter to hold readers attention. It also takes a closer look at two men who played a very important role in Birmingham's race relations, making it a standout amongst many of the other books about the civil rights era.

Black&White is well researched and sourced. Several pages of back matter are included. The book has recieved two starred reviews - Kirkus and Booklist
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Format: Hardcover
4.5 out of 5 Stars

The March on Birmingham evokes images of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. leading thousands of people through the streets of a 1960's Birmingham, Alabama. Huge dogs barely contained by the law enforcement officials to whom they are entrusted. Fire hoses drawn, aimed, and shot--firing torrents of throbbing, rushing water into the crowd hurtling protesters several feet through the air, and chaos run amuck. Seldom, if ever, does Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth spring to mind. Though I grew up in the birthplace of the Civil Rights Movement, Montgomery, Alabama, before reading Black & White, I had never heard of Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth. Like many of you, I depended on the public school system to teach me all I needed to know of the the Civil Rights Movement and its leaders. However, had it not been for Fred Shuttlesworth, desegregation in Birmingham may have been months or even years away.

Raised in a home without running water or electricity, the notion of becoming a preacher struck Fred, the oldest of nine children, at an early age. After graduating near the top of his class, Fred began working with a group of doctors sterilizing needles. There he would meet his wife, Ruby. After moving his family to Mobile, Alabama, for better job opportunities, Fred joined Corinthian Baptist Church and soon began subbing for the pastor during his absence. Believing that he would impact multiple lives, Fred sought formal biblical training, earned a teaching degree, as well as, obtained a pastorate. Never one to be tolerant of inaction, Fred espoused a holistic philosophy blending an individual's spiritual needs with responsible citizenship, forming an inseparable mixture permanently severing all ties of either entity operating independent of the other.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I think the thing that sticks out to me most about this book is the power that one person can have to make a difference for either good or evil. Despite tremendous pressure and attempts on his life, Shuttleworth refused to back down from his efforts to end segregation. He was arrested numerous times, beaten up several times, had his home blown up and he still refused to give in. Connor on the other hand was just as committed to keeping segregation in place and wasn't above using his political position to fight for the status quo. In the end though his hatred and violent methods backfired on him. Shuttleworth's commitment to the nonviolent approach even in the face of great violence helped win the day.

This is a fascinating comparison of two men who were completely committed to a cause but who used very different methods and the chosen methods ended up determining the end result. A great example that indeed the end does NOT justify the means.
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