Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Black Women in the Ivory Tower, 1850-1954: An Intellectual History Hardcover – February 11, 2007

2 customer reviews

See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$96.96 $49.95

The Underground Girls of Kabul: In Search of a Hidden Resistance in Afghanistan by Jenny Nordberg
The Underground Girls of Kabul: In Search of a Hidden Resistance in Afghanistan by Jenny Nordberg
The girls portrayed in this book are not resisting with weapons or spying: they are simply living their lives as boys. Learn more | See related books

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Provides scholars with a historical lens from which to view the higher education of black women... [and] how one generation of black women benefited from the work and sacrifices of the prior generation." - Adah L. Ward Randolph, Ohio University"

Book Description

“Provides scholars with a historical lens from which to view the higher education of black women . . . [and] how one generation of black women benefited from the work and sacrifices of the prior generation.”--Adah L. Ward Randolph, Ohio University
 
“Keen historical and theoretical observation of African American women’s relationship to educational institutions in the United States.”--Heidi Lasley Barajas, University of Minnesota
 
Evans chronicles the stories of African American women who struggled for and won access to formal education, beginning in 1850, when Lucy Stanton, a student at Oberlin College, earned the first college diploma conferred on an African American woman. In the century between the Civil War and the civil rights movement, a critical increase in black women’s educational attainment mirrored unprecedented national growth in American education. Evans reveals how black women demanded space as students and asserted their voices as educators--despite such barriers as violence, discrimination, and oppressive campus policies--contributing in significant ways to higher education in the United States. She argues that their experiences, ideas, and practices can inspire contemporary educators to create an intellectual democracy in which all people have a voice.
Among those Evans profiles are Anna Julia Cooper, who was born enslaved yet ultimately earned a doctoral degree from the Sorbonne, and Mary McLeod Bethune, founder of Bethune-Cookman College. Exposing the hypocrisy in American assertions of democracy and discrediting European notions of intellectual superiority, Cooper argued that all human beings had a right to grow. Bethune believed that education is the right of all citizens in a democracy. Both women’s philosophies raised questions of how human and civil rights are intertwined with educational access, scholarly research, pedagogy, and community service. This first complete educational and intellectual history of black women carefully traces quantitative research, explores black women’s collegiate memories, and identifies significant geographic patterns in America’s institutional development. Evans reveals historic perspectives, patterns, and philosophies in academia that will be an important reference for scholars of gender, race, and education.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 288 pages
  • Publisher: University Press of Florida; 1st edition (February 11, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0813030315
  • ISBN-13: 978-0813030319
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 6.4 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #6,067,083 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

5 star
100%
4 star
0%
3 star
0%
2 star
0%
1 star
0%
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
If you are a woman of color in academia, this is an enlightening work to read. If you think the process has been challenging for you, the stories here will confirm that it has always been a hard road and we have to thank the women who did it before us. They actually made our path easier - hard to believe, but very, very true! They are to be honored and this collection does just that.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By CL Nash on February 21, 2015
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Evans does a phenomenal job at putting together information on Black women's intellectual history. We nee more work such as this. Thank you!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again