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BlackBerry: The Inside Story of Research in Motion Hardcover


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Key Porter Books (March 16, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1552639401
  • ISBN-13: 978-1552639405
  • Product Dimensions: 9.3 x 6.6 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,274,299 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

ROD MCQUEEN has been a journalist for more than thirty years and has lived and worked professionally in London,Washington, D.C., and Toronto. During that time he has written for numerous magazines and newspapers, and has also done broadcast work. He is the author of eleven books, including Who Killed Confederation Life?, winner of the National Business Book Award, and the bestseller, The Eatons: The Rise and Fall of Canada`s Royal Family, winner of the Canadian Authors Association Award in history. The Icarus Factor, the unauthorized biography of Edgar Bronfman Jr., was published in 2004. He lives with his wife in Toronto.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Excerpt from the Preface of

BlackBerry:

Welcome to the Revolution Mike Lazaridis moves to the microphone with the

easy self-assurance of a successful inventor whose creation, BlackBerry, is as well known in the family room as the boardroom. As he looks out at the shareholders attending the July 2009 annual meeting of Research In Motion (RIM), he knows that he has a room full of happy investors. The market capitalization of the firm ? the number of shares times the per share value ? is $43 billion, making RIM three times bigger than Motorola, a major competitor founded in 1928, more than half a century before RIM’s brave beginnings in 1984 as a two-man shop on borrowed money. Share price has recovered to $75, more than double the levels reached during the global financial crisis that battered all companies six months earlier. At the peak of his powers, Lazaridis is one of thoserare people in business who rightly deserves to be called a genius. “It’s a privilege to work with experts every day,” he said, referring to RIM’s 12,000 employees, including 5,000 in research and development, up from a total of only 100 employees in 1997. “We knew we were building a company for the long term,” he said. “We’re just absolutely obsessed with customer quality, the reliability of the product, and the value we’re providing the carrier, the enterprise, the IT manager, and the user. You turn it on and it just works,” he said.The device works so well that the company sold 50 million BlackBerrys by January 2009, half of those in the previous year alone. BlackBerry commands a 55 per cent market share of the U.S. smartphone market, and a 21 per cent global market share, as Research In Motion increasingly becomes the first choice for the world. RIM has also become Canada’s most valuable tech company with annual revenues of more than $11 billion and annual growth of 84 per cent, a meteoric rate usually reserved for start-ups. In fact, Fortune Magazine ranked RIM at the top of its 2009 list of the 100 Fastest Growing Companies in the world and RIM’s ranking at the top of the 2009 “Tech 100” list published by Canadian Business magazine illustrated RIM’s tech titan status in Canada with a market cap that was actually more than double the combined value of the other 99 publicly traded Canadian technology companies on the list. And according to a Millward Brown brand study, the BlackBerry brand value grew 390 per cent in the past year and is now worth $28 billion, ranked as the sixteenth most valuable brand in the world and tenth in North America. In just ten years, the BlackBerry brand grew from cult object to icon status and ranks higher than other household names such as Intel, Amazon, American Express, Disney and Pepsi.


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Customer Reviews

3.3 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By R. Pokkyarath on July 23, 2010
Format: Hardcover
I've always been fascinated with RIM; not sure why, it's perhaps due to a perception I have that RIM has depth, both from a technological and business standpoint. I've long stopped reading books that chronicles the rise of companies and have walked right past bookshelves that proclaim the arrival of new giants like Facebook and Twitter, but, RIM, of course, is different and I had to get it.

Now, the book is good and it starts well. It does give an 'inside story' about the company and does a fairly good job of providing an overview of the company right from pre-inception to where it stands towards the end of 2009; it covers the early business approach, the financing aspects and transitioning as a major player with the introduction of BlackBerry. However, towards the end it gets a little light and fluffy, if I may say so. I would have preferred to read more about the technological challenges RIM overcame (there are pieces here and there such as the single mail box problem, Show Low project) and a bit more about how they successfully navigated the market with all those big guys around. Personally I would have preferred the last few chapters compressed into fewer pages; for example, I mean, I wasn't really that interested in knowing all the specific charity contributions of the early team members; so instead of enumerating that it would've been better if something else had taken its place. But, in overall, it does give you a picture about how RIM became what it is today. If you are part of the Black Berry cult you might like it more since there is a lot of emphasis on the personalities.

PS - Einstein's notion of God is a bit different... "I do not believe in a personal God and I have never denied this but have expressed it clearly.
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Format: Hardcover
How could a journalist with 30 years experience publish a book in 2010 that completed missed Blackberry's looming crisis?--not even a sniff of it? The last chapter dismisses Apple by basically saying that there is no company, not Microsoft, not Palm, not Apple, that has ever or will ever come close to killing Blackberry. Oops!
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Format: Hardcover
A previous reviewer was totally correct - this is written like a company press release. Also, it's not about the Blackberry device as much as it is about the RIM company.

You'll need to be able to overlook the continuous flow of gushing compliments the author gives the top two executives (for example, how one was in a minor car accident but wouldn't rush back for a business meeting until he knew the other driver was okay and the police had arrived). It's likely the two are indeed good people and smart businessmen, but the book is way over-the-top in patronizing them.

Having said that, the author's writing style is good and the details he brings out paints an interesting picture of the company's financials, funding, staffing, joint ventures and multiple product directions. The Blackberry isn't part of the story until you're past the halfway point. Even then, there's so much more about the cell phone market that could have been shared with the reader, but wasn't.

Business students might enjoy the "case study" nature of this book. Just be aware up front about what it is, and what it isn't.
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