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Blacklisting Myself: Memoir of a Hollywood Apostate in the Age of Terror Hardcover – February 5, 2009


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 250 pages
  • Publisher: Encounter Books; 1 edition (February 5, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1594032475
  • ISBN-13: 978-1594032479
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 6.3 x 9.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (24 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,467,861 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Years ago, I read Roger L. Simon's first mystery novel, The Big Fix, and I was delighted. Roger was a left liberal then and so was I. Now Roger's politics and mine have changed, but his gifts as a writer have only grown richer. Blacklisting Myself is a story of Hollywood and America, funny and perceptive at the same time. --Michael Barone, US News & World Report, American Enterprise Institute

Review

Rueful, thoughtful, refreshingly direct, and full of juicy inside stories, Roger L. Simon's memoir is the best and most intimate account of Hollywood's politics yet published.

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Customer Reviews

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Read it and learn.
Morris Goldstein
The Hollywood insider Roger L. Simon's autobiography highlights his past as a modestly successful novelist and film writer.
David Thomson
Smart, funny, insightful ... "Blacklisting Myself" is a delight.
Joe R. Hicks

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

76 of 87 people found the following review helpful By Jane Whitson on February 16, 2009
Format: Hardcover
If you, as I, are fascinated by how people begin the slow, often painful process of authentic life change after centering their lives on radical political and cultural positions we thought would never end--or we thought would end in some utopian fantasy world--then you won't want to miss Roger Simon's recently released "Blacklisting Myself."

Smart, clever, sophisticated, funny and radically honest, Roger has filled his book with recollections and vignettes from the wild and crazy days of the 60s and 70s when drugs, sex and rock and roll flowed freely over the land but turned out, as we all know, were not really free at all.

Going back with Roger as an erstwhile radical left screen/mystery writer residing in Hollywood after graduating from Dartmouth is an edifying and intersting trip. It's a long, long way from wanting to be "lionized as Fellini and idolized as Che" to being the current CEO of the conservative internet site known as Pajamas Media and sending Joe the Plumber to Gaza on a reporting assignment for PJTV recently.
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52 of 60 people found the following review helpful By S. K. Chartwell on February 4, 2009
Format: Hardcover
I was expecting to like this book, as I've long been a fan of both Roger Simon's detective fiction and his incisive political/cultural blog. But I was nevertheless surprised at what a terrific read this book proved to be, from start to finish. It's a great memoir of life inside the belly of the movie business, told with the grace, humor, and bite (and telltale stories!) that one would expect from a first-rate writer. But more than that, this is a compelling account of one man's struggle with the dueling angels of liberal political orthodoxy and common sense. It's still on my bedside table; I re-read it every night. I hope that, as a true child of Hollywood, Simon is already at work on the sequel.
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54 of 63 people found the following review helpful By Joe R. Hicks on February 5, 2009
Format: Hardcover
Roger L. Simon's writing is not only a refreshing look-back at the politics that informed the Sixties-era Hollywood film industry, but also the direction of American pop culture post-Vietnam and Watergate. His breezy, often humorous style walks us through his interactions with figures as diverse as Barbara Streisand, Woody Allen, Warren Beatty and Richard Pryor to Abbie Hoffman, Black Panther leader Elaine brown and Timothy Leary. As a former Marxist theoretician-turned-political conservative, I especially appreciate Simon's thoughtful description of his own re-evaluation of his left leanings that eventually shifted significantly to the right. Smart, funny, insightful ... "Blacklisting Myself" is a delight. > Joe R.Hicks
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27 of 34 people found the following review helpful By LA book lover on February 3, 2009
Format: Hardcover
I can't think of the last time I was so riveted to a memoir. With great humor and honesty, the author recounts his journey through the shifting landscape of Hollywood from the late sixties to the present. Finally someone who was at the center of the counter culture gives an insightful account of how we ended up where we are. The conclusions Simon draws are profound, yet the book is a joy to read. Who could ask for more?
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26 of 33 people found the following review helpful By Michael T Kennedy VINE VOICE on February 6, 2009
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Roger Simon would probably not agree to being called "conservative" but you can put only so many words in a review title. He has made a journey from his college days at Dartmouth, when he yearned to be a leftist radical yet was too fearful (and sensible) to accompany a classmate to Cambridge for an LSD party with Timothy Leary. He became a Hollywood screenwriter and novelist with an Academy Award nomination (for Enemies: a Love Story) with three wives and a gay son who became a father last summer via a surrogate mother. That is a full life for anyone.

His slow conversion from conventional (for Hollywood) leftist liberal began with the OJ Simpson trial. He and his wife watched the slow motion white Bronco chase, as I did from the bar in the Denali Lodge in Alaska, knowing that only a guilty man would behave that way. They watched the trial, and even got to attend one day when his wife won the daily lottery for seats. Sitting in the courtroom, he watched OJ flirt with his wife from the defendants table. OJ was so confident by that time, and rightly so, that he could revert to his womanizing nature and ignore the spectacle. After the acquittal, Roger began to examine his feelings about civil rights and affirmative action and the impact on the black "community" that allowed those jurors to ignore mountains of evidence. I watched much of the trial from Hanover, New Hampshire as I worked on a graduate degree after I had retired from medicine. I had one of the new satellite dishes and the afternoon session coincided with the end of my day of classes so I watched quite a bit of the trial. My impressions were a bit different from Roger's but his thoughts about the jurors were shared.
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