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Bleak House Paperback – Large Print, February 14, 2008


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 544 pages
  • Publisher: ReadHowYouWant (February 14, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1427040915
  • ISBN-13: 978-1427040916
  • Product Dimensions: 7.8 x 10.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.6 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #177,904 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Charles Dickens's early childhood was happy until his father was imprisoned for debt. The 12-year-old Dickens then began working ten-hour days in a boot-blacking factory pasting labels on the jars of thick polish. The shocking conditions of the factory made a profound impression on him. His anger at his situation and at the conditions endured by working-class people became major themes in his fiction.

More About the Author

One of the grand masters of Victorian literature, Charles Dickens was born on February 7, 1812, in Landport, Portsea, England. He died in Kent on June 9, 1870. The second of eight children of a family continually plagued by debt, the young Dickens came to know not only hunger and privation,but also the horror of the infamous debtors' prison and the evils of child labor. A turn of fortune in the shape of a legacy brought release from the nightmare of prison and "slave" factories and afforded Dickens the opportunity of two years' formal schooling at Wellington House Academy. He worked as an attorney's clerk and newspaper reporter until his Sketches by Boz (1836) and The Pickwick Papers (1837) brought him the amazing and instant success that was to be his for the remainder of his life. In later years, the pressure of serial writing, editorial duties, lectures, and social commitments led to his separation from Catherine Hogarth after twenty-three years of marriage. It also hastened his death at the age of fifty-eight, when he was characteristically engaged in a multitude of work.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Mike B on August 3, 2011
Format: Paperback
This is truly a marvellous and captivating work of story-telling. My volume, at over 800 pages, is so eminently readable. Of course there are passages that are - Oh so very Victorian - the love between Esther and Ada is gushy beyond words. But there are many chapters so the story is constantly on the move.

There are at least 25 characters depicted and the settings are unique and artistically rendered. The anchor of it all is Esther. Some of the characters are but caricatures - I found Skimpole tiresome and Ada hardly convincing. There are great confrontations throughout this complex story that all comes together at the end - although I could not quite understand the significance of that last letter of George to Esther. Perhaps, as well, some of the characters like Gridle die rather quickly - at least unexpectedly.

Dickens portrayal of the downtrodden is always so emotional and vivid. There are so many different plots and lively characters that one is constantly entertained at so many different levels throughout this long story.

Dickens is truly a master storyteller in love with his craft.
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