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Blind Faith Hardcover – June 20, 2006


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Product Details

  • Age Range: 12 and up
  • Lexile Measure: 750L (What's this?)
  • Hardcover: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster Books For Young Readers; 1St Edition edition (June 20, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1416902732
  • ISBN-13: 978-1416902737
  • Product Dimensions: 1 x 5.4 x 8.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.1 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,900,506 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Grade 7 Up–After the death of her grandmother, 15-year-old Liz Scattergood is having a hard time getting back to normal. Her mother, who had an extremely close relationship with Bunny, has become deeply depressed, and only visits to a Spiritualist church whose members believe they can communicate with the deceased provide any comfort. Lizs atheist father disapproves, causing anger and tension between him and his wife, and leaving Liz caught in the middle. The new boy who moves in across the street could be a welcome distraction, but he has only come to town to live with his cranky grandmother because his own mother is dying. Comfortable pacing and natural dialogue keep readers engaged in the predominantly emotional action of the story. Wittlinger has created realistic and sympathetic teenage characters whose struggles with grief, love, and faith have no easy answers.–Beth Gallego, Los Angeles Public Library, North Hollywood
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Booklist

Gr. 7-10. Fifteen-year-old Elizabeth has always envied the bond that her distracted, artistic mother shared with Elizabeth's grandmother, Bunny, and wonders, "How come I wasn't part of this chain of mother-daughter best friends too?" Then Bunny dies, and Elizabeth feels even more shut out as her mother sinks into a consuming grief. Only visits to a nearby spiritualist church, where members claim to channel the dead, seem to cheer Liz's mom, but the church brings increasing friction with Liz's atheist dad. A fragile romance with Nathan, her new 16-year-old neighbor, helps Liz begin to talk about her complicated feelings. Once again, Wittlinger brings readers right into a teen's roiling emotional life with sensitive, skillful descriptions, written in Liz's voice, of how feelings register: Liz understands Nathan's sadness in his "low-key, no-wattage, half smile" and her mother's grief in the lost energy that leaks "like air from a knifed tire." Not all characters, including Liz's mother, feel fully developed, but the precisely observed, palpable moments and provocative questions about faith make a memorable story. Gillian Engberg
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By TeensReadToo on July 26, 2006
Format: Hardcover
It was bad enough when fifteen-year-old Liz Scattergood's grandmother, Bunny, died. It's even worse now that her mother seems to have gone crazy. For weeks her mom wouldn't get out of bed, wouldn't eat dinner with Liz and her father, wouldn't even brush her hair. Although Liz understands that her mother and Bunny had a special bond, were more like sisters, in fact, than mother and daughter, Liz doesn't understand the extreme depression. That was almost preferable, though, to what happens when her mother snaps out of her funk and finally leaves the darkened comfort of her bedroom. Because now she's found religion--or, in this case, Spiritualism, where the congregation and leaders believe they can communicate with the spirits of the dead.

After her mom's first visit to Singing Creek, the Spiritualist Church, she comes home acting alive for the first time in weeks. Liz is curious enough to agree to accompany her the following Saturday, but Liz's dad is none too pleased with the developments. For him, religion is filled with hypocrites and fools, and the crazies that attend Singing Creek are the worst of the lot--they hold out hope to those who have lost someone they love, convincing them that they can really "talk" to the dearly departed's spirit.

For Liz, these new arguments of her parent's is shaking up her once comfortable life. Added to that is the new family who has moved in across the street. There's Courtney, [...]and a total joy, and fifteen-year-old Nathan, who always seems so angry. Their mother, Lily, is dying of leukemia and has come home to spend her final days with her mother, dubbed by Liz as Mrs. Crabby.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Michelle on April 10, 2008
Format: Paperback
I'm not good at summarizing so I'm not but Blind Faith is really good. The plot of the book is about something that I've never read about before, I'm pretty sure it's very rare but it is very good. It's sad but not extremely (I didn't cry or anything) and I finished it in just a few days (which is good for me since I don't have much time on my hands) RECOMMEND IT!!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Teen Reads on February 9, 2007
Format: Hardcover
Award-winning author Ellen Wittlinger is known for her emotional and poignant teen novels like SANDPIPER and Printz Honor Book HARD LOVE. In her latest effort, BLIND FAITH, she delivers yet again with a tale of loss and new beginnings.

When 15-year old Liz Scattergood's grandmother Bunny dies, Liz's mother falls into a depression. People always said that Liz's mom and Bunny were "more like sisters or best friends than mother and daughter," which makes Liz feel strange. How come she isn't like this with her own mother?

Her mother is so depressed over the loss of Bunny that she won't get out of bed or work on her pottery in the studio. Then one day, she announces she's going to the Singing Creek Spiritualist Church to "contact Bunny." Liz's father, an atheist, isn't thrilled about the idea, but Liz's mother goes, and only then does her life return to normal. She gets out of bed. She works on her pottery. And now, she goes to the Spiritualist Church every week. Although Liz isn't sure what she thinks of the spiritualists, she agrees to go with her mother and hopes that maybe they will bond over their experience of contacting Bunny. But this just pushes Liz's father away and causes more of a rift within the family.

While Liz is dealing with her own chaos, she becomes entangled with the lives of the new neighbors: Nathan, a boy her age, and Courtney, his younger sister. Nathan, Courtney, and their mother Lily have just moved in with their grandmother, the old lady who lives across the street and who Liz calls Crabby. But as Liz gets to know Nathan, she learns that he has problems too. His mother has a terminal disease and she might die. Plus, everyone's keeping it a secret from Courtney because she's too young to understand.
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By Jacob Godfree on January 3, 2008
Format: Paperback
Blind Faith was a good book. Funny, sad, and entertianing. Definitly somthing I would suggest to someone looking for something nice to read in their spare time.
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Format: Hardcover
Blind Faith, by Ellen Wittlinger is without a doubt one of the best books I have ever read. It follows the life of Liz Scattergood after the death of her grandmother, Bunny. Liz encounters many obstacles including her mother's obsession with a Spiritualist church, her neighbor's two grandchildren moving in, and her parents constant fighting. Nathan, the new kid next door, forms an unlikly bond with Liz, and together, they heal eachother's pain. I would recomend this book to anyone, not just teenagers; it teaches amazing lessons everyone should know!!!!
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