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The Blind Side (Movie Tie-in Edition) (Movie Tie-in Editions) [Kindle Edition]

Michael Lewis
4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (425 customer reviews)

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Book Description

The book behind the Academy award-winning film starring Sandra Bullock and Tim McGraw—over one million copies sold.


When we first meet him, Michael Oher is one of thirteen children by a mother addicted to crack; he does not know his real name, his father, his birthday, or how to read and write. He takes up football, and school, after a rich, white, Evangelical family plucks him from the streets. Then two great forces alter Oher: the family's love and the evolution of professional football into a game where the quarterback must be protected at any cost. Our protagonist becomes the priceless package of size, speed, and agility necessary to guard the quarterback's greatest vulnerability, his blind side.



Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Starred Review. As he did so memorably for baseball in Moneyball, Lewis takes a statistical X-ray of the hidden substructure of football, outlining the invisible doings of unsung players that determine the outcome more than the showy exploits of point scorers. In his sketch of the gridiron arms race, first came the modern, meticulously choreographed passing offense, then the ferocious defensive pass rusher whose bone-crunching quarterback sacks demolished the best-laid passing game, and finally the rise of the left tackle—the offensive lineman tasked with protecting the quarterback from the pass rusher—whose presence is felt only through the game-deciding absence of said sacks. A rare creature combining 300 pounds of bulk with "the body control of a ballerina," the anonymous left tackle, Lewis notes, is now often a team's highest-paid player. Lewis fleshes this out with the colorful saga of left tackle prodigy Michael Oher. An intermittently homeless Memphis ghetto kid taken in by a rich white family and a Christian high school, Oher's preternatural size and agility soon has every college coach in the country courting him obsequiously. Combining a tour de force of sports analysis with a piquant ethnography of the South's pigskin mania, Lewis probes the fascinating question of whether football is a matter of brute force or subtle intellect. Photos. (Oct.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Bookmarks Magazine

As in Moneyball (**** July/Aug 2003), which chronicled the strategies behind the Oakland A's general manager Billy Beane, Berkeley-based author Michael Lewis takes a personal look at a complicated game in his newest nonfiction extravaganza. Just as they embraced Moneyball, critics eagerly wrap their arms around The Blind Side. It's much more than a treatise on football; it's an exploration of the limits of conventional thinking and how strategic changes affect the value of quick-footed behemoths. However, while most reviewers are positive, something holds them back. Maybe Lewis makes it all look too easy. Or perhaps, as The New York Times charges, he takes the easy route through a complicated set of stories. That he makes it easy for his reader to comprehend—and enjoy—is enough for most critics to give Lewis's latest a rousing cheer.

Copyright © 2004 Phillips & Nelson Media, Inc.


Product Details

  • File Size: 735 KB
  • Print Length: 348 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 039333838X
  • Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company; Movie Tie-in Edition edition (October 12, 2009)
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services, Inc.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B002SAUCGC
  • Text-to-Speech: Not enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #15,311 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
116 of 122 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A touchdown November 4, 2009
Format:Paperback
I became a Michael Lewis fan years ago when I read Liar's Poker. Fan may be too strong a word. I realized then that I enjoyed his style and so when browsing the book store, and with the movie trailers out, seeing that the book was by Lewis, i decided to give it a shot.

I was not disappointed. Lewis has a way of writing that brings something which you are not a part of into your life and make you one with it. Some of his short works i still find that I remember vividly, twenty years later and recite from on occasion.

Here we have an encouraging story of a young black boy who really has nothing in his life but his athletic ability. We have a good family that certainly does not need to exploit the boy. So they did what we all should want to do if our situations allowed, take the boy in and help. But the story is not just about that, it covers the evolution of football, these last thirty to forty years as marquee quarterbacks, or productive west-coast offense systems come into play.

In essence it is two books because of that, and it is what makes the story. I had to call my football buddy up half-way through and tell him I had a book he needed to read. Now I have to watch a game and wonder what the left tackle is doing.

This book was a very good read, and well worth the time and effort. It may not be as fun ultimately as Playing for Pizza by Grisham, but it is pretty good in its own way.
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261 of 287 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Multiple Stories, All Good September 26, 2006
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
An incredible human interest story detailed further below but first.........the author of Liar's Poker and Moneyball is at it again with an offbeat interesting subject, or multiple subjects which are intertwined. This is an analysis of the evolution of the left side tackle designed to protect the quarterback's blind side, particularly from the evolution of speed rushers in the Lawrence Taylor mode. Lewis starts with an in depth analysis of Joe Theisman's famous leg break with some interesting facts even Joe didn't remember including who may really have been responsible. Separate stories are then presented of the new prototype Left Tackles like Jonathan Ogden whose investment banker father showed him that his value at Left Tackle would out way any interest in playing college basketball for his 6'9" son. This part of the book is intertwined with a historical perspective of how the passing game developed mainly through the Bill Walsh West Coast offense which downplays the significance of the quarterback. This section of the book is intertwined around the personal story to be described and while extremely interesting to football fans will have virtually NO appeal the typical female fan or other casual fans.

But what will be of greater human interest is the overlay of the story of Michael Oher, the "man/child" currently playing football at Ole Miss. Oher shows up at a predominantly white Christian school in the 9th grade with virtually no school history and horrible family background. An incredibly shy 350 pound kid struggles but ingratiates himself to faculty and staff and manages to stick around.
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73 of 83 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Inspirational Story September 25, 2006
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
Like in Moneyball and Liar's Poker, Michael Lewis examines a culture, e.g., baseball, stock market, and now football, while interspersing a biography illuminating the underlying culture.

In this case, Mr. Lewis shows how the left tackle position has rose from obscurity in the 1960s into one of the highest-paid positions in the current game. The initial focus is in how specialized a person must be to play this position as the highest level (more rare than many other positions). After this description, Mr. Lewis introduces us to Michael Oher, a person who has all of the physical tools and then some but has never played organized sports and has basically been abandoned since early childhood.

The people (parents, coaches, etc.) all want to help Mr. Oher fulfill his potential. However, it doesn't come off as being completely altrusitic as all benefit whom are in his presence, e.g., coach parlays his involvement into a college coaching position. In addition, the recruiting battles for Mr. Oher's services amplify these traits.

His adoptive parents and coaches seem angelic compared to the NCAA in this story. One of the most sobering statitistics quoted in this book is that only one of five players capable of playing in the NFL ever make through the legal and educational morass that is the NCAA.

It's hard not to root for Mr. Oher and I would think we'll see his name at the top of the draft board in 2007-2008. Excellent book and highly recommended.
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31 of 35 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Beyond the Game of Football October 16, 2006
Format:Hardcover
As both an avid sports fan and reader of sports literature I found this to be by far the most outstanding sports related book I've ever read. (I've read lots of them)

Michael Lewis does a superb job of combining football statistics with human life drama as he chronicles the serendepidous coming together of the Touhy family and Michael Oher and all that follows.

If you love big time college football you'll enjoy reading about recruiting tactics of big time coaches, i.e. Fullmer, Saban, & others.

If you love NFL football you'll enjoy the statistical based reasoned explanation of how the game has evolved & changed over the past couple of decades. Throw in descriptions of personalities about prominent NFL people, i.e. Walsh, Ogden, Wallace, and others and you have a statistical based explanation with a genuine human approach.

Lewis is "Grishamesque" in his treatment of Michael Oher - I'm pulling for Michael to become an all pro left tackle.

Details of Michael's struggles, perserverance and successes brought tears to my eyes. Details of the Touhy family's care and nurturing of Michael reinforced my belief in the good of mankind. The world needs more people like them!!

Michael's final encounter with Antonio Turner caused me to jump to my feet, thrust my fist into the air and say, YES!!!!

This book is an incredible read about life, fate,big time sports and the economic value of highly skilled athletes. It is also about something more - the great economic and cultural divide in this country as evidenced by Urban America in general and Hurt Village and Dixie Homes in particular. Political leaders and public policy makers should read this book - it strikes at the heart of one of our country's greatest challenges in the 21st century - how do we close the gap between the "haves and have nots?"
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Most Recent Customer Reviews
4.0 out of 5 stars So much deeper than the film
Four years ago I saw the film "The Blindside" with Quinton Aaron and Sandra Bullock.

The movie was excellent, and as usual - it shows a miniscule portion of what... Read more
Published 14 days ago by Simple Citizen
5.0 out of 5 stars Good book
Ordered this for a teenage boy to do a book report on. Easy reading. Way better than the movie by far.
Published 20 days ago by Charity Partain
5.0 out of 5 stars The Blind Side
I chose this rating for this book because I really enjoyed it. I love to read true stories that end well.
Published 1 month ago by allison irvin
5.0 out of 5 stars An amazing story
The best sports stories can be the ones that only have a little to do with sports. Such is the case with Michael Lewis' "The Blind Side," which certainly deserves its... Read more
Published 1 month ago by WDX2BB
5.0 out of 5 stars Inspiring story
A captivating story that gets you up close and personal to a quiet kid. I laughed & cried throughout the book. I enjoyed every word.
Published 1 month ago by Stephanie Diane Allen
5.0 out of 5 stars The blind side is a great book it got me through tough times in...
Take care for your help with the same way galaxy nexus jelly bean on my way to get to see
Published 1 month ago by Toshia Andrew
3.0 out of 5 stars Not keen on the religious aspect, but overall, it's pretty good
The movie didn't emphasize the deep religiosity of the family...the book definitely does. I have nothing against it, it just doesn't resonate for me. Read more
Published 2 months ago by Willow
5.0 out of 5 stars More a sports book than the movie...
The book is definitely different than the movie, which was much more focused on the family relationship of Tuohy family as Oher becomes a part of their family. Read more
Published 2 months ago by J.R.
5.0 out of 5 stars Inspiring
I saw the movie and once I read the book, it was like I was sucked into it and just lived it in my mind. This was definitely was the BEST book I have EVER read. Read more
Published 2 months ago by Football guy
4.0 out of 5 stars A real life hero’s tale.
This well done account, which is mostly told from people’s perspective of Michael, was a story with a lot of heart. Mr. Read more
Published 3 months ago by Whymsy Likes Books
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More About the Author

Michael Lewis, the author of Boomerang, Liar's Poker, The New New Thing, Moneyball, The Blind Side, Panic, Home Game and The Big Short, among other works, lives in Berkeley, California, with his wife, Tabitha Soren, and their three children.

Amazon Author Rankbeta 

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#21 Overall (See top 100 authors)

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"The Blind Side" Question
The Movie Tie-In edition features a new brief afterword bringing Michael Oher's story up to date for 2009.
Nov 10, 2009 by John DiBello |  See all 2 posts
Michael Oher
Perhaps you have more information than I. What is the evidence that Oher needs MORE counseling?
Oct 10, 2006 by T. Hopkins |  See all 2 posts
Ole Miss Football Recruiting
Don't know much about Ole Miss football recruiting, but I felt badly that you had not had a reply in nearly three years.
Jun 4, 2009 by Jeffrey Aldridge |  See all 2 posts
book appropriate for a kid who loves to read?
yes its actaully less bad then the movie which wasnt that bad to begin with
Dec 23, 2009 by Emma M. Mitchell |  See all 3 posts
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