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  • Blind Spot - Hitler's Secretary
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Blind Spot - Hitler's Secretary


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Product Details

  • Actors: Traudl Junge
  • Directors: Othmar Schmiderer, André Heller
  • Writers: Othmar Schmiderer, André Heller
  • Producers: Danny Krausz, Kurt Stocker
  • Format: Multiple Formats, Color, Full Screen, NTSC, Subtitled
  • Language: German (Dolby Digital 2.0 Surround)
  • Subtitles: English, Spanish, French
  • Region: Region 1 encoding (US and Canada only)
    PLEASE NOTE:
    Some Region 1 DVDs may contain Regional Coding Enhancement (RCE). Some, but not all, of our international customers have had problems playing these enhanced discs on what are called "region-free" DVD players. For more information on RCE, click .
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: PG (Parental Guidance Suggested)
  • Studio: Sony Pictures Home Entertainment
  • DVD Release Date: October 28, 2003
  • Run Time: 90 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (50 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B0000CABBT
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #74,322 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "Blind Spot - Hitler's Secretary" on IMDb

Special Features

  • In German with English, Spanish, or French subtitles

Editorial Reviews

The astonishing true story of Hitler¹s private secretary coming to terms with working alongside unspeakable evil after remaining silent for nearly sixty years. In 1942, Traudl Junge was an apolitical22-year-old chosen from a clerical pool to work as one of Adolf Hitler¹s private secretaries. Working day-in, day-out for Hitler, Junge viewed him as a surrogate father figure, private and polite, nothing like the crazed rhetorician of his speeches. Shielded from the knowledge of Hitler¹s acts of atrocity and convinced she was in the center of information, she was actually in a blind spot. As theNazi regime teetered on destruction and Hitler plunged further into madness, Junge witnessed everything up to the final chaotic days in the bunker. Completed just months before Traudl Junge¹s death,BLIND SPOT: HITLER¹S SECRETARY is a riveting personal history which demands to be seen by all.

Customer Reviews

I've not read her book, and am not certain that I will.
Kendra
I soon realized that there could be nothing more dramatic than being privy to the recollections of Frau Junges short but life altering time with Hitler.
F. Gentile
"Blind Spot" is an interview with an old woman, Traudl Junge, who a long time ago was one of Hitler's secretaries.
M. B. Alcat

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

84 of 85 people found the following review helpful By Peccator on December 27, 2003
Format: DVD
I would have given this film four stars (the quality suffers, not the content), but I feel Norm's review diminishes the importance of the film. If you are at once creative and analytical, you'll find a rich depth. In the film, Frau Junge doesn't excuse herself; in fact, I think she is too hard on herself. And though she doesn't put on a Hollywood penance performance, she does maintain her dignity, having been troubled for the better part of a life. Her brutal honesty can be seen in a poignant moment when she makes a comparison between herself and Sophie Scholl, who was the same age as Junge.
Although the film appears to have been shot and edited by first year film students, the film is important in that it portrays a slice of history firsthand. Frau Junge is clearly intelligent and remarkably clear about her experience. It is simply amazing how much detail she remembers, and after so much time! It's also obvious that this experience colored and directed the remainder of her life.
I wish the film was longer. I'm no history buff, but the Junge's recollections kept me glued to the set, pausing on the subtitles. The tragedy of Junge's life is that she separated herself from her feelings and repressed her experience, when she could have found some therapy by writing a detailed first-hand historical account. I think it would have come natural, her mind being wonderfully linear and her articulation of events easy to follow.
It will bother some people that Frau Junge's personal portrayal of Hitler, while unsympathetic, often countermands the megalomaniacal historical portrayal. But the reality of this film is that it is not about Hitler--it's an intimate portrait about a woman named Traudl Junge who was fated to a time and to a place.
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169 of 179 people found the following review helpful By mirasreviews HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on November 5, 2003
Format: DVD
"Blind Spot" is an interview with Traudl Junge who, as a young woman, worked as one of Adolph Hitler's secretaries, living alongside Hitler and other prominent members of the 3rd Reich between 1942 and 1945. Before Frau Junge died, at the age of 81, she gave this interview to filmmakers André Heller and Othmar Schmiderer in which she recounts her experiences with and her impressions of Adolph Hitler and the last days of the Reich. Frau Junge (née Humps) was entirely unsophisticated in political matters and an aspiring dancer when she took a job as a secretary in the Chancellery in Berlin. At her well-connected brother-in-law's urging, and in spite of her initial disinterest, she applied for and got a better position taking dictation for the Führer himself. Hitler was kindly and protective toward her, and she liked him. Her close proximity to him gave her firsthand knowledge of Hitler's health, his ideals, his private manners and personal habits, his paranoia, and the attempts on his life, which she describes as best she can in "Blind Spot". Perhaps understandably, Frau Junge had considered her position close to the Führer and his generals as an opportunity to gain a better understanding of the War and of Nazi policies, as she would be so near their source. Not until later did she realize that, being privy to Hitler's inner circle, she was actually in a "blind spot", sheltered more than anyone from what was going on in Germany. Frau Junge's description of the activity within the Chancellory in Berlin during the last few weeks of the War constitutes at least half of the film. Her account of the bizarre events of April 1945 is truly gripping. The audience can sense the panic and hopelessness that permeated the Chancellory as the Nazi empire came crumbling down.Read more ›
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25 of 27 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 2, 2004
Format: DVD
Frau Junge makes no excuses for her naivete and, in fact, blames herself for not seeking out the truth. She speaks of Hitler's days in the bunker with painful candor and apologizes after recalling his love for his dog (which he later tests his poison capsules on) which she thinks is, in the greater picture, a frivolous memory. She also recalls an attempt on Hitler's life, his last-minute marriage to Eva Braun and the announcement that Hitler's body had been burned per his last wish. Nobody else who was with Hitler on his last day has ever spoken out and this is a fascinating, historical and important testimony.
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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 2, 2004
Format: DVD
I originally rented this from a video store. I wasn't sure what I was going to see, but this turned out to be one of the most interesting DVD's I have seen in a long time. While I am not a Hitler fan, I am curious about this monster and what kind of people were around him at the time of his madness.
Most secretaries (such as I) get to know people in a slightly different way. I think that is what was so fascinating about this woman. Evidently, she was discarded by other Germans and never got to tell her story. While I know some history on Hitler, this documentary shed new light on the personal side of the man. He was not much better, but there was a side of him that appeared to be somewhat human at times.
I now own a copy of this DVD, as I collect documentaries and biographies on film. I highly recommend this to individuals interested in Hitler who think they know everything about him -- there was more.
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15 of 17 people found the following review helpful By F. Gentile on November 5, 2003
Format: VHS Tape
I was initially briefly disappointed with this video. Expecting it to be a documantary, I was surprised to see, about twenty minutes into the film, that it was and would remain a simply filmed interview. There would be no artsy cut-aways to old newsreels, no family photos, indeed, not even a vintage, time relevant photograph of the films subject, Traudi Junge. Though I was intrigued with hearing the story of Hitlers personal secretary, I had expected something more dramatic. I soon realized that there could be nothing more dramatic than being privy to the recollections of Frau Junges short but life altering time with Hitler. Though I speak no German, and I don't doubt the word of those who have commented that one would get more out of the film should they speak German, I had no problem with the normally dreaded subtitles. Traudi Junge's expressions and inflections transcended any language barrier. When I first learned that these were memories she has never publicly, and rarely even privately, spoken of, I was doubtful. However, after watching and listening to her, and sensing the huge release from her that divulging the memories of that time gave her, and her spontaneity in recounting those memories, I was no longer doubtful. Her bottled up emotion is palpable. I must admit that I, like many, also have my doubts about all those who claimed to know next to nothing of the carnage that Hitler and his social order were inflicting. But Frau Junge so convincingly and eloquently reflects on that time when she was but a twenty two year old, naieve young girl, that you can almost see that young girl before you, though you are looking at a woman in her early eighties.Read more ›
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