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Blogging the Revolution: Caracas Chronicles and the Hugo Chávez Era Paperback – March 3, 2013


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 378 pages
  • Publisher: Cognitio, LLC (March 3, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1939393159
  • ISBN-13: 978-1939393159
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 1 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (23 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #788,822 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Francisco Toro founded Caracas Chronicles in September, 2002. Born and raised in Caracas, he studied at Reed College (Portland, Oregon) and the London School of Economics. A political scientist by training, his journalistic work has appeared in the Washington Post, the New York Times, Foreign Policy, the International Herald Tribune, The New Republic, and the Financial Times, among others. He's currently a consultant based in Montreal, where he lives with his wife and daughter. Juan Cristobal Nagel has co-edited Caracas Chronicles since 2004, and edited the present volume. Born and raised in Maracaibo, he graduated from Caracas' Universidad Católica, and then went to the University of Michigan for graduate work in Economics. His work on Venezuela has appeared in Foreign Policy, Americas Quarterly, Prodavinci, and El Mercurio of Chile, among others. He is currently Professor of Economics at the Universidad de los Andes in Santiago, Chile, where he lives with his wife and their three daughters. He divides his time between Chile and Venezuela.

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Customer Reviews

I also have been reading the Caracas Chronicles blog for years and I just love it.
Dagoberto Salazar
An excellent collection of articles by Toro and Nagel chronicling the Chavez phenomenon and its effect on Venezuela.
Casimiro
It is insightful, well-written, concise -- and above all, I found it quite entertaining.
Christopher Salcedo

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 17 people found the following review helpful By F. Monaldi on March 3, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Caracas Chronicles has been an indispensable source of lucidity and perspective in these turbulent and often unintelligible times in Venezuela. Toro and Nagel have been right on target, without pretending to be ludicrously impartial; they have been able to rise above polarization, trying hard to make sense of an often implausible reality. Blogging the Revolution shows them at their best. If you are not already a fan, you will become one.
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12 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Moraima Garcia on March 5, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
If you want simplistic explanations this book is not for you. A series of the best articles from the respected blog Caracas Chronicles, here you will find a nuanced view of Venezuela, it's problems and opportunities. If you want a book where Chavez is God coming to save the poor, this is not for you. And if you want a book where Chavez is Hitler bent on destroying all the good in the world, this is not for you. It will make you question issues if only you are willing to open your mind to alternate views beyond the polarized sphere of public discourse in Venezuela. Caracas Chronicles is a place for free thinkers and this book summarizes the best of 10 years of chronicling a government and a president that has captured the interest around the world. You might hate him or love him, in these pages you might get to finally understand him.
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12 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Dagoberto Salazar on March 6, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I'll start by dropping any pretense that I'm an unbiased reviewer: I'm a Venezuelan that has opposed Chavez since 1992. I also have been reading the Caracas Chronicles blog for years and I just love it.

But the relevant thing here is why I love Caracas Chronicles: After many years of only being fed with either militant "Chavez is the devil" media, or sycophantic "Chavez is our savior" propaganda, I came across this little blog where, in a very clear and didactic way, the authors dissected which were the underlying problems with Chavez, which were the consequences of his actions, and how it all fitted in the grand scheme of things... and they did so by providing hard data and plenty of references that I could check out by myself and form my own opinion on.

You know, I'm just that kind of guy that hates being fed with propaganda, disregarding where it comes from.

So, this is my advise for you, whether you are pro-Chavez, anti-Chavez, or in-between: If you want to have a chance of really understanding the whole dynamics going on on that piece of South America I call my homeland, this is the book to start with.

Moreover: If you're a busy person that needs to get the basics very quickly, just read the whole opening post: "The Petrostate that was and the Petrostate that is". In half an hour you'll get more insight than wading through years of standard media articles. And I guarantee you it will be time well spent.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By LHLE on March 6, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition
I have been reading the blog. And yes the articles are from the point of view of people that pretend to be less unbiased that most opponents to the government. . AT least They try to give to the reader another point of view that the Latin american departments in the Academia with "saudade" and nostalgia for the 60's for Salvadorian revolution or The Cuban Revolution won't read. So if you want to read something and you get to your own conclusion.
And in comparison to other bloggers they try to be less passionate ...they are biased of course nobody is totally objective... But ok that is up to you, you want to know the other side of the story this is a good start.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Rafael Osio Cabrices on March 6, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Nagel and Toro have developed in their blog one very rare view over Venezuela's present and recent past: one that allow to syncronize the observation of political ideas and practices that chavismo has been exploding to obtain and retain power, with the monitoring of its economic policies and its (successful) efforts to replace the weak institutions that inherited Chávez administrations. Also, Caracas Chronicles has provided the Venezuelan public opinion (and the world public opinion) with an approach to my country's reality that goes beyond the narrow categories we've been too accustomed to use when we try to understand what we've passed through.
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7 of 10 people found the following review helpful By C. Moore on March 4, 2013
Format: Paperback
OK, so, I have to admit that I have NOT read the book yet. However, I HAVE read and participated in the blog [...] for a few years now. Francisco Toro and Juan Cristóbal Nagel have written humorous, intellectual, and, sometimes divisive, pieces on the soap opera that has been Venezuela for the last 14+ years. It's almost like reading Dante's "Inferno", except that Venezuela IS the inferno! Yes, they represent, for the most part, the "opposition" point of view. But, beyond that, they represent the REALISTIC side of the politics of what's happening in Venezuela. This is the "don't ask, don't tell" part of Chavismo that no one involved in Chavismo wants you to read or know. And if you think that learning about Hugo Chávez and his "Bolivarian Revolution" isn't important, then, you have another "think" coming. I'm getting ready to download the Kindle version right now.
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Format: Kindle Edition
This book provides the fastest and most useful way to bring you up to date on how modern day Venezuela operates. The book manages to articulate the issues that continue to shape life in Venezuela while building a foreign reader's background knowledge about the personalities and events that influenced the current situation. The analysis of the logic that governs Venezuela is so thorough and well articulated, that one is quickly able to make sound statements and predictions about how Venezuela will move forward. It should be a must-read for all foreign diplomats. The content of this book was an indispensable source of information for the English speaking community when the only English language newspaper, The Daily Journal, ceased to exist in the middle of the years covered. While the content is clearly from the opposition's point of view, it was never the condescending finger wagging that would appear in the Economist nor the infantile name calling and sloganism that passed as journalism in opposition circles. Be forewarned. Quoting Toro or Nagel in opposition circles will arouse much ire. Their analysis is critical, informed and thoughtful which along with coffee, sugar and milk is a scarcity today in Venezuela.
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