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Blogwars Hardcover – March 7, 2008

ISBN-13: 978-0195305579 ISBN-10: 0195305574 Edition: First Edition

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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press; First Edition edition (March 7, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0195305574
  • ISBN-13: 978-0195305579
  • Product Dimensions: 9.5 x 1.2 x 6.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,758,486 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review


"Would blogs really matter that much, and if so would they alter the American political system for the better or worse? David Perlmutter, a professor of journalism at the University of Kansas, has plunged into cyberspace as both a researcher and blogger to look for answers...For readers unfamiliar with the political-blogging terrain, his book serves as a worthy introduction."--The Boston Globe


"A significant advance in the study of blogs...this book represents a major step forward in blogs being taken seriously and analyzed not simply as words on a computer screen but as a dynamic part of the political landscape."--DailyKos


"David Perlmutter 'gets' the blogosphere in a way that few outside observers do, going beyond the tired arguments about whether bloggers are damaging the civil debate by their partisanship and volume, about whether nonprofessional journalists and pundits should have a say in that debate, and about whether the phenomenon is just a flash in the pan. Perlmutter recognizes what these new media-blogs, YouTube, social networking sites-bring to the table: a reinvigoration of the public side of the public debate, a real and profound demonstration of the political process."--Joan McCarter (mcjoan), Contributing Editor, DailyKos


"Perlmutter's Blogwars is an impressive primer on the politics and political implications of the blogs and the blogosphere."--Kathleen Jamieson, University of Pennsylvania


"David D. Perlmutter seizes lasting truths from the phantasmagorical whirl created by ever-new communication technologies. Blogwars makes a lasting contribution to our understanding of politics and the Internet, while establishing Perlmutter as a pioneer and important voice in modern political communication scholarship."--Steven Livingston, George Washington University


"An experienced blogger himself, David Perlmutter has without question written the most comprehensive book to date on blogs in American politics. This volume is essential for anyone who wants to understand the history and impact of blogs, as well as the critical role bloggers have played and will play in the electoral campaigns, and a must-read for anyone interested in politics in general."--Robert E. Denton, Virginia Tech


"Books on blogs by bloggers vastly overstate their case and overpromote their cause. David Perlmutter, however, puts blogs in the proper perspective, giving an insightful and highly useful account of how blogs actually are changing American politics as a new tool in a growing arsenal of weapons for political operatives and pundits."--Erick-Woods Erickson, Editor, RedState.com


"David Perlmutter brings the analytical bent of a scholar on the phenomenon of blogging. As a lover of news as well as the new, he also brings a fan's passion to the subject. I am most grateful for both the scholarly perspective and the fan's passion."-Scott. W. Johnson, powerlineblog.com


About the Author


David D. Perlmutter is a Professor and Associate Dean for Graduate Studies and Research at the William Allen White School of Journalism and Mass Communications at the University of Kansas. Author or editor of four books on politics and the media, his writings have also appeared in The Los Angeles Times, Christian Science Monitor, International Herald Tribune, USA Today, and the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. He is a former board member of the American Association of Political Consultants. He is editor of the blog of the Robert J. Dole Institute of Politics at the University of Kansas (http://www.doleinstituteblog.org/).

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By J. DeSimone on May 7, 2008
Format: Hardcover
Prior to reading the book, I was pretty ignorant to the world of Blogging. As one who does not read political Blogs, I was mainly confused about why people do Blog and why others read them. Those answers, and then some, were answered by this book.

Perlmutter starts out explaining what a Blog is, which is easy to understand to the non tech-savvy individual. However, the book does not insult one's intelligence at all. It moves along quickly with fascinating facts and humorous bits that make the book a joy to read.

The introspective book is an excellent jump-on point for the non-Blogger and Blogger alike. It's fun, informative and just plain enjoyable.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I have written on the internet for years. This is a good and accurate look at the blog world. The book is not partizant and does not favor any political side. As a blogger I found the book so what. But I did see what I write as a hobby this book accuralty reflects what you can expect to get into when you share your opinions. It is a rough and tuble world out there.

It is a mean place the blog world and it takes a great deal of time.

Perllmuter also goes into the history cause and effect of different events and campaigns that involved blogs. He also ties blogs to past forms of comunication back to depictions of the Battle Keddish.

If you blog you will find this booring but it is a great world if you are not fimilliar with blogging. The book goes into how bloggers got both Dan Rather and Trent Lott when they steped out o f bounds. The blogs have power. It is no one individual but how stories take a life of their own. Not that all internet traffic is spontainious much of it is contrived by some proment opinion holders.

Still if it is a good book if you are interested in politics or comunication. I would say that Blog Wars is a good first start to look at define and explain the political blogging universe.
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4 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Nathan Rodriguez on May 7, 2008
Format: Hardcover
Perlmutter offers an entertaining and insightful review of the history of blogging (pre-internet to its current form), and peppers his analysis with information gleaned from interviews with the most important bloggers today.

This is a particularly well-written book: inviting enough for those new to the blogosphere, yet penetrating enough to satisfy those more well-versed with the phenomenon.

Great read.
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By Andrew Kent on November 29, 2008
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Perlmutter has written an eye-opening book about blogging. While focused on political blogging, many of the insights translate more generally, including the way talent is uncovered, how first-person reporting can occur, and how diligent experts can track down the truth better than the mainstream media. Overall, Perlmutter's a level-headed guide, very articulate and thoughtful. A worthwhile read!
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2 of 14 people found the following review helpful By BaylessKtol on June 22, 2008
Format: Hardcover
In 1934 Columbia University social scientist Theodore Abel persuaded the German government to carry out this project among the German people: Abel offered cash prizes for the essays that best expressed how and why the Nationalist Socialist German Workers' Party (NSDAP) achieved such rapid growth and popularity. Abel published the 'winning essays' and a less-than methodologically perfect analysis in 1938, under the title, Why Hitler Came into Power. Apparently aware of his methodological limitations, Abel resisted making unwarranted generalizations, but did prise open a chink in the prevailing belief that

"the NSDAP was essentially a lower-middle-class movement supported by elements of the undereducated, economically marginal ...petty bourgeoisie desperately afraid of proletarianization during a period of acute economic distress and social dislocation".... to whom National Socialism was " "the psychological reaction of the lower middle class" to the political traumas of the postwar era and the loss of its economic position and social status."

Abel, and subsequent analysts of the essays he collected, realized that the appeal of NSDAP ranged across all classes of German society; something more than economic dislocation was taking place: German people, rich, poor, and in between felt their values were being undermined; they joined NSDAP as a way to reclaim their national identity.

Of the blogs Perlmutter discusses in Blog Wars., the most familiar is DailyKos, presumably a wide open forum for advocacy of all things that tend to support the Democratic party.
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More About the Author

DAVID D. PERLMUTTER is a professor at the William Allen White School of Journalism & Mass Communications, University of Kansas. He received his BA and MA from the University of Pennsylvania and his Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota. He has served as a Board member of the American Association of Political Consultants and now sits on the National Law Enforcement Museum Advisory Committee for its Media Exhibit. A documentary photographer, he is the author or editor of seven books on political communication and persuasion: Photojournalism and Foreign Policy: Framing Icons of Outrage in International Crises (Praeger, 1998); Visions of War: Picturing Warfare from the Stone Age to the Cyberage (St. Martin's, 1999); (ed.) The Manship Guide to Political Communication (LSU Press, 1999); Policing the Media: Street Cops and Public Perceptions of Law Enforcement (Sage, 2000); Picturing China in the American Press: The Visual Portrayal of Sino-American Relations in Time Magazine, 1949-1973 (Rowman & Littlefield, 2007); (ed., with John Hamilton) From Pigeons to News Portals: Foreign Reporting and the Challenge of New Technology (LSU Press, 2007), and Blogwars: The New Political Battleground (Oxford, 2008). He has also written several dozen research articles for academic journals as well as over 150 essays for U.S. and international newspapers and magazines. He writes a regular column, "P&T Confidential," for the Chronicle of Higher Education. He has been interviewed by most major news networks and newspapers, from the New York Times to CNN and ABC and most recently, The Daily Show. He is editor of the blog of the Robert J. Dole Institute of Politics at the University of Kansas (http://www.doleinstituteblog.org/) and has a personal blog about blogging (http://policybyblog.squarespace.com/)