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Blood on the Altar: The Secret History of the World's Most Dangerous Secret Society Paperback – January 3, 2005


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 170 pages
  • Publisher: Independent History and Research; First edition. edition (January 3, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0970378432
  • ISBN-13: 978-0970378439
  • Product Dimensions: 8.4 x 5.5 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (32 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #544,144 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Craig Heimbichner has a master's degree in education. He is a former high school principal and a freelance writer, lecturer and researcher.

More About the Author

Craig Heimbichner is the co-author of the award-winning new book, Ritual America. He has contributed to Secret and Suppressed II (Feral House), and Paranoia: The Conspiracy Reader (Volume 1). He recently appeared on Brad Meltzer's Decoded (History Channel) explaining the Bohemian Grove. "Secret society historian Craig Heimbichner follows the Middle Path to wisdom. He stays awake when we are all asleep. He works the graveyard shift in the secret lodge. He break-dances with the skeletons in the closet. He does the hokey-pokey with his whole body in. He shakes it all about. He turns himself around. And he tells us what "IT" is all about." - Joan d'Arc, Paranoia The Conspiracy Reader

Author's statement regarding "Blood on the Altar," which originally lacked the colorful subtitle (the original title was a line taken from a document by Aleister Crowley--"and blood shall cover the altar"--with a different meaning):

I once attempted a book on the OTO with a humorous touch in many places, a non-religious tone, and an avoidance of exaggeration. The publisher, unbeknownst to me, ghost wrote whole sections and published the tremendously altered version without my prior knowledge or consent. The result was a mish-mash of his and my writing and ideas, completely changing the book, which adopted a sensationalized tone, many religious ideas (of his), and strong points of view from the publisher mixed throughout the work. The book then took on a life of its own, with many of his passages appearing on other websites under my name. It is time to set the record straight. I am moving past it to release in the next year a book which truly reflects the entertaining approach I have regretted was left behind in the wake of the prior book. Read Ritual America, co-authored with Adam Parfrey. It is humorous, fascinating, free of bias, and award-winning (Silver Medal in American History in the Independent Book Publisher Awards). I hope you enjoy it! - Craig Heimbichner

Customer Reviews

3.5 out of 5 stars
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I found the book expertly researched and informative.
Philetus Hereticus
Whether you agree with Mr. Hiembechner's conclusions or not there is no question of the seriousness of this researher and his disciplined methods of inquiry.
mgk
There may be a secret society running the world but this fellow has it all wrong.
Cody Grundy

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

43 of 58 people found the following review helpful By Adam Parfrey on October 23, 2006
Format: Paperback
You may not agree with the supposition that the OTO is an elite ranking of Freemasonry, though several 32 degree Masons I know of are Crowleyites. I don't suspect that many military or governmental freemasons go to practice sodomy sex magick after drinking with their buddies at National Sojourners' gatherings.

That said, Craig Heimbichner's book is well-sourced and has a great amount of intriguing information not found elsewhere, both in scare books by Fundamentalist Xtians and hagiographies by Thelemites.

Well worth a read!
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61 of 84 people found the following review helpful By Michael Tozer on September 24, 2006
Format: Paperback
Craig Heimbichner's book is extraordinarily well done. A previous reviewer mentioned that it could well be seen in tandem with Michael A. Hoffman's important "Secret Societies and Psychological Warfare". In fact, Heimbichner's book is published by Independent History and Research, which is Hoffman's company. And Mr. Hoffman was also kind and generous enough to offer a review here recorded by Amazon. Moreover, readers of Hoffman will recognize the unmistakable influence of Hoffman in Heimbichner's style.

The preceding notwithstanding, "Blood on the Alter" is well written and important on its own account. Heimbichner shares with his readers herein the benefit of his evident serious and far reaching study of the cryptocracy, together with a well organized and excellent presentation. Those reviewers who have crudely criticized both style and content of this book clearly have another axe to grind.

Perhaps the greatest relevance of Heimblichner's account occurs toward the end of the corpus of his book. There, the author contrasts the moral and intellecutal bankruptcy of "judeo-christianity" with the small but growing movement of those who seek out the truth fearlessly. This is perhaps the most important dichotomy in today's world, and we are rightly grateful to Mr. Heimbichner for so clearly elaborating this terribly important dynamic. Read this very important book, and be both richly blessed and well informed.
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44 of 61 people found the following review helpful By J. L. Mortimer on February 5, 2005
Format: Paperback
Conspiracy books are fun to read because they are usually so out of touch with reality that they almost amount to comic relief from the grimness of the world around us. This is not one of those books. "Blood on the Altar" is a work that shows the results of many years of serious research into an area that, easy as it is to ignore, is a real and sinister factor in the way we have fallen under the control of forces that are far from benign.

Heimbichner traces the many tentacles of secret organizations--many of whom are careful, like Scottish Rite Masonry, to "put a happy face" on for public view, while concealing even from the lower ranks in their lodges what the upper echelons are actually involved in.

What is so extraordinary about this book is not just the range and scope of citations from the "secret" documents of the organizations themselves (though that is mightily impressive), or the rogue's gallery of scoundrels and criminals to which we are introduced, but the way the book traces the genealogy of the occult currents that stretch back over millenia and keep recurring in new forms over the centuries. Not only does this book expose the underlying aims and methodologies of these nefarious cultlike groups, in particular the OTO, which Heimbichner credibly portrays as the controlling central group today, but he demonstrates the ways in which the Cryptocracy controls and manipulates the populace, all the while chipping away at the cultural values that once defined the West as a civilization.

All this is presented in lively and often sardonically witty prose, and to have crammed this much history and information into a mere 170 pages is an impressive achievement.
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88 of 126 people found the following review helpful By Michael Hoffman on January 25, 2005
Format: Paperback
Craig Heimbichner unravels not just a powerful and heretofore largely unknown secret society, but more importantly, the command process that guides it. "Blood on the Altar" reveals the inner Thelemic mechanism behind the outer organization and is recommended to all serious students of how clandestine elites actually gain and hold power.

--Michael A. Hoffman II

(Hoffman is the author of "Secret Societies and Psychological Warfare")
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34 of 49 people found the following review helpful By Occult scholar on February 19, 2007
Format: Paperback
This book is jam-packed with information and gores just about everyone's sacred cow with wit and insight as it shines a spotlight on the vermin-infested corner of occult Masonry. The campaign to slander this book on Amazon run by Masons and Thelemites (members of the OTO, subject of this book) is proof that the author struck the proper nerve. The lies posted below would be amusing if they weren't the (illiterate) product of such a campaign. For example, one recent reviewer mocks the author's statement that vampirism belongs to the upper levels of the OTO, but surely knows that the "Mass of the Phoenix" of the OTO is also known to initiates as the "Mass of the Vampire," and for good reason. Kenneth Grant not a member of the OTO run by Bill Breeze, which is "legally recognized?" What a joke. Take a trip to Peter Koenig's OTO website in Switzerland and you will find a document from Aleister Crowley authorizing Grant to run the whole bloody organization. That Breeze "won" something in the U.S. court system is another joke; in fact, followers of Marcelos Motta in the Society of the OTO claim the whole operation was run by the CIA through the courts. And the author never, ever claims that all of these individuals are members of the "same" OTO, but highlights the different and various individuals and branches of the OTO phenomenon.

These OTO reviewers are so full of contradictions that they praise the glossary and the research while saying it is "ridiculous." Really? They also pull out accusations and "tags" which are inaccurate, such as "racial bias" or mentions of UFOs (utterly absent from the book) in an attempt to attack the author or the book itself.
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