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Blood Kin Paperback – February 25, 2014


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Solaris (February 25, 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1781081972
  • ISBN-13: 978-1781081976
  • Product Dimensions: 5 x 0.8 x 7.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #97,659 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

The multiple storylines—alternating points of view between the present day protagonist and his grandmother in the 1930s—are an excellent hook that adds appeal to this Southern gothic story. (Kirkus)

About the Author

Steve Rasnic Tem was born and raised in Lee County, Virginia, in the heart of Appalachia. He is the author of over 350 published short stories and is a past winner of the Bram Stoker, International Horror Guild, British Fantasy, and World Fantasy Awards. Following the publication last year of his Solaris novel Deadfall Hote, Steve has published two short story collections—Ugly Behavior (New Pulp Press) and Onion Songs (Chomu)—soon to be joined by Celestial Inventories (ChiZine) and Twember (Newcon). In 2014 PS Publishing will bring out his standalone novella In the Lovecraft Museum.

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
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Few writers capture this voice so well.
M. Litton
Take the cover away and yes, you have a wonderful book.
Night Owl Reviews
The story ends in a climax to end all climaxes.
nottooterrible blog

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Majanka on March 2, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition
Blood Kin is dark, unsettling, and deliciously creepy. Alternating between the 1930s and present day, it tells the legacy of a family haunted by mystery and horror, and something very dark and sinsiter.

Michael Gibson cares for his grandmother, Sadie. She’s old, sick, and on the verge of dying, but she clings on to life, with one last story to tell. The more she tells Michael about the history of his family, about an iron-bound crate buried four feet deep in a small shack, about mountain people he never even knew, the more he begins to realize the story’s importance. Not just for him, but for everyone in the valley.

What bothered me the most about the story is how disjointed it feels. I realize I’m not the first reviewer commenting on this, but it’s the truth. The first part of the book is mostly historical fiction, Southern gothic, with only a hint of the horror to come. It starts out strong, then the middle part drags on, expanding upon certain themes I’m not sure had to be expanded on, and then the end is one dashing scene of horror after the other. As if the book exists of two seperate genres smashed together in a less than favorable execution.

If the book had stuck to one genre, and would’ve been a bit shorter (the middle part really drags on), it would’ve been great. As it stands now, it’s a decent read, but not spectacular.

I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By M. Litton on March 5, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Gotta admit the cover caught my eye, the bold color and perspective, like some old hunger creeping up out of the soil. Don't judge a book by its cover, they say, but here the story holds true, as does the language, gathering force and meaning as if hatched from Appalachian stone and root, as well as the people hidden in the hollows and hills. Few writers capture this voice so well. And the characters take vivid shape -- live, breathe, and die. No, this doesn't read like a film script, though spare, it maintains the depth and scope of a novel, an engrossing one easily read in a few evenings. I'll not reveal the plot twining like kudzu to a horrid climax, but two characters I'll never forget, the young girl Sadie and her starkly grim uncle the Preacher -- a villian to rival the Judge in Blood Meridian or any other you'd rather not cross paths with. Settle in and let this heat the coals of your psyche and feel it crawl up your spine and enter your blood. It may even nourish something near to your heart.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on March 23, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I was reluctant when first viewing this book, only two reviews, what gives? I thought it sounded promising so gave it a go. I happen to love southern gothic's and this one delivered. Beautifully creepy, written in that slow southern style it made me feel like warm mollasse melting down my back, sticky yet oddly satisfying. A little disjointed like too many mojito's on a hot summer day, head spinning, napping under a willow tree only to dicover you may have fell down the rabbits hole. Backwoods magic, snake handling, crazy preacher man, poverty & strife, moonshine, and A dark legacy. I've got my eye on this author and am craving more.
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By Garnet on June 16, 2014
Format: Paperback
This book is well-written and takes you into a creepy world of the Gibson family, descendants of a strange bunch of people who have darker skin and spoke an odd Elizabethean form of English when they were first discovered in the South. The Gibson's have psychic gifts, some of which end up being a blessing and some more of a curse. Half the book takes place in modern times, when Michael moves back to the strange rundown old house out in the woods to take care of his grandmother. She tells him stories even as she gets weaker and weaker, stories that he sees and feels as much as hears...for he has the Gibson gift as much as she does. The other half of the book takes place during the 1930's and is the story of his grandmother, Sadie, as a young girl who is trying to escape from what others expect of her, especially her creepy relative, the Preacher. The Preacher runs a strange snake-handling church and bad things happen to those who cross him...as Sadie soon finds out.

What are the secrets that Sadie is trying to impart to her grandson, Michael, and what does it have to do with a chained and padlocked box in an old shed in the middle of the kudzu...kudzu that, more and more, seems to have a mind and will of its own. What really happened back in the 1930's that something is abbout to "awaken" and come after them? Will Michael be able to hear the whole story in time to stop the terrible thing that is coming?

This story starts out a bit slow at first, but it pulls you deeper and deeper into the world it creates. This would make for a very creepy movie. This one is definitely not a book you want to read late at night.
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More About the Author

Steve Rasnic Tem was born in Lee County Virginia in the heart of Appalachia. He is the author of over 350 published short stories and is a past winner of the Bram Stoker, International Horror Guild, British Fantasy, and World Fantasy Awards. His story collections include City Fishing, The Far Side of the Lake, and In Concert (with wife Melanie Tem). Forthcoming collections include Ugly Behavior (crime) and Celestial Inventories (contemporary fantasy). An audio collection, Invisible, is also available. His novels include Excavation, The Book of Days, Daughters, The Man In The Ceiling (with Melanie Tem), and the recent Deadfall Hotel. In this Edward Gorey-esque, Mervyn Peak-esque novel a widower takes the job of manager at a remote hotel where the guests are not quite like you and me, accompanied by his daughter and the ghost of his wife--"a literary exploration of the roots of horror in the collective unconscious."

You may visit the Tem home on the web at www.m-s-tem.com.

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