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Blood and Money Paperback – September 9, 2001


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 512 pages
  • Publisher: Running Press; Reprint edition (September 9, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0786709472
  • ISBN-13: 978-0786709472
  • Product Dimensions: 8.6 x 5.6 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (65 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #148,145 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Thomas Thompson was also the author of such titles as Hearts, Richie, Lost, and the compelling best-seller Serpentine.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

If I tell you anything else, it will ruin the suspense.
Loretta Dillon
I started to read this book years ago, but had to return it to a friend.
Ladytailwind
Absolutely one of the best true crime books ever written.
Joni Van Deventer

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

34 of 36 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 12, 1999
Format: Hardcover
"Blood and Money" first published in 1976 is a true page turner and a major piece of non-fiction journalism. Set thiry years ago in the moneyed mansions of Houstons River Oaks it is a spellbinding tale of an oil millionares(Ash Robinson) obsessive love for his daughter(Joan Robinson) and her ill fated third marraige to a rising star plastic surgeon(John Hill). Events take tragic and unexpected turns carrying along the readers emotions. Then the author brings us through a series of court trials deepeening the characters and shading their motives. Abruptly the story leaves behind the privileged rich lives and burrows into the sleazy underbelly of Texan prostitution and petty crime culminating in a final pursuit and spectacular murder trial. No fiction is a match for the awful truth here and the writer Thomas Thompson meticulously unravels this bizarre saga of greed, power, lust, love and murder. All the characters are deeply shaded and by force of sheer detail their lives are brought into vivid focus. It is a sprawling narrative similar to Norman Mailers "The Executioners Song" although largely confined to the somewhat strange state of Texas. Thompson must have utilized every possible material(court transcrits, autopsy reports, police files, photographs) and person avialable to him. Conversations are carefully reconstructed, events are colorfully described and the author seamlessly insinuates himself into the mind of each of the characters. Readers enjoy a fly- on-the-wall perspective of the characters doings and actions. Ultimately "Blood and Money" can fairly take its place alongside other New Journalism classics like "In Cold Blood".Read more ›
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36 of 40 people found the following review helpful By Edison McIntyre VINE VOICE on May 29, 2006
Format: Paperback
I don't write many "me too" reviews in this space, but I can't resist recommending "Blood and Money," not only for afficianados of "true crime" literature, but for anyone interested in the workings of the American legal system. I know little of the city of Houston or of Texas, but I gather that Thomas Thompson's tome is also an excellent snapshot of this booming energy/medical/cultural complex, c.1970.

The details of the story are covered by other reviewers here. It's interesting that many have come to hard conclusions about the legal culpability of certain principals in this long, involved story (perhaps being influenced by other sources), while Thompson himself passes no definite judgments (though it's not difficult to tell what he's implying). Although there are no source notes or acknowledgments, one has the impression that Thompson included little in this account that could not be corroborated by "reliable sources," although he does include some speculation on specific points.

But the real value of the book, as I said, is not so much in portraying guilt or innocence but in dealing with a larger issue: the impact of wealth, social prestige, and publicity on the legal process and on justice. Depending on how one views the evidence presented by Thompson, it's not unreasonable to say that none of the principals involved in this entire episode received justice from the Texas court system. Some relatively minor players went to jail, and one died, in part, because of their involvement. But for the big fish in this case, the legal system in the end had no answers and no closure. I'll leave the deeper reflections on class and justice to Karl Marx.

Another thought: This book should be required reading in medical schools.
Read more ›
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19 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Collar Wilson on October 28, 1999
Format: Hardcover
I saw the mini-series starring Farrah Fawcett before I read the book. I was intrigued by the movie. I had never heard of Joan Olive Robinson Hill before and after seeing the movie I wondered about her and her life and if it were possible that her husband did in fact kill her. There were a lot of questions that needed answering. I read the book and was amazed at the attention Thomas Thompson gave to even the smallest detail and how he was able to draw you into the story, you almost felt like you were there when these events happened. The book did not absolutely say that John Hill had killed Joan Hill, but it certainly provided ample motive and opportunity. And the scenario that describes the way he might have done it seems plausible. Who knows? This does not take away at all from the drama of this story and as John Hill himself is dead as well, there are some things we will never know. Thomas Thompson makes you feel empathy for Joan and her situation. He also makes you feel sympathy, compassion and scorn; why didn't she just leave the bum and find someone who really wanted her. I loved this story.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By J. Reynolds on May 1, 2003
Format: Paperback
The depiction in this interesting book is accurate, according to events reported in the Houston newspapers that covered these events. I was fortunate to actually see Ash Robinson one morning in 1978, in the driveway of his River Oaks home, wearing pajamas and putting something in the trunk of his car. It was awesome.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Shannon Deason on September 3, 2006
Format: Paperback
When i was a little boy, I snagged this book off my mother's bed stand and could not but it down, obviously it was not exactly what my mother would want me to read at ten, but it was just a fantastic read, and it happened in Houston, which for me made it totally fascinating. The story is so amazing you really cannot believe this really happened, but shockingly it did, the Hill mansion in River Oaks still sits on its corner, astride to Kirby Drive. This is a well written barn burner on a story that pleaded for this kind of treatment. Really, one of the best true crime books every written, highly recommended.
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