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Blood in My Eye Paperback – December 19, 1996


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Blood in My Eye + Soledad Brother: The Prison Letters of George Jackson + Assata: An Autobiography
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 195 pages
  • Publisher: Black Classic Press; Reprint edition (December 19, 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0933121237
  • ISBN-13: 978-0933121232
  • Product Dimensions: 8.4 x 5.5 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #94,675 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Blood In My Eye was completed only days before it's author was killed. George Jackson died on August 21, 1971 at the hands of San Quentin prison guards during an alleged escape attempt. At eighteen, George Jackson was convicted of stealing seventy dollars from a gas station and was sentenced from one year to life. He was to spent the rest of his life -- eleven years-- in the California prison system, seven in solidary confinement. In prison he read widely and transformed himself into an activist and political theoretician who defined himself as a revolutionary.

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

26 of 27 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 26, 1998
Format: Paperback
This book offers an excellent, honest portrayal of the day to day reality of 70s black revolutionairies and it can be promised that once you begin reading, you will rush to the end.
This book takes you to the heart of the Black Power movement and is so intriguing because it is written by someone who lived, and died for a cause in which he believed.
So often books or studies that focus on this specific facet of the civil rights era dillute the reality of the moment, because they are writing from a mere spectator's point of view, rather than from the perspective of actual participants.
For this reason, this book should be a must read for anyone studying the Black Panther Party--if they want to know the principles, beliefs and hopes of the people.
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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 2, 1998
Format: Paperback
George Jackson, a man imprisoned for robbery at a young age and given one year to life in the penal system. Self educated in jail by the works of Marx, Fanon, Mao, Che and many other revolutionary intellectuals. Powerful comments on Urban Guerrilla Warfare. A must read for anyone grappling with the question of How? How can we strike a blow at the Oppressors, read this book you will glean ideas, what you do with them is on you. peace!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By T. Jenkins on July 20, 2007
Format: Paperback
This monumental work encompassing politics, economics, history, military strategy, psycology, self-defense and critical analysis is one of the most important works written by an author of African descent. There are a select few books which I would honestly call timeless classics but this along with Carter G. Woodson's "The Mis-Education of the Negro," are two which should be required reading for every New-Afrikan male. There are so many key points and observations made which are prevalent in todays society that it becomes clear as to the reason why the author was viewed as a threat to American society at large.

This is George Jackson at his finest. Thirty years before the Bush era inspired fears of American fascism, this literary master-piece warned of the impending danger. George warned that "no facist regime "in power" would "advocate the abolition of any form of private ownership." Over the past 7 years we've seen blatant examples of this come to life in Afghanistan, Iraq, Iran, Venenzuela, Liberia, Zimbabwe and countless other hotspots around the world. Viewing the mistakes of history Jackson from the confines of his cell was able to offer up such historically accurate assessments as "war taken to the point of diminishing return weakens rather than strengthens the participants."

In the tradition of Malik El Hajj Shabazz, David Walker, Denmark Veasey, Nat Turner and countless others, the call for a unified, fearless resistance to oppression earned George L. Jackson a death sentence. How much of a threat was he, consider this.
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8 of 11 people found the following review helpful By T. Gaither on October 26, 2003
Format: Paperback
Now I figured out where Ja Rule got the title for his new album from. Upon reading this book, it addressed the racial, sociatal, politcal, and emotional abuse that was going on in his life and towards blacks. I think it was not fair that he got one year to life in prison just for stealing $70.00 from a store. I think he should've served some prison time and community service. But being gave life in prison for a misdemeanor is definately wrong!. If he were white he would probly get 2 years in prison & probation. But they did not allow that for blacks back during that time. I thought the collection of essays & letters expressed his feelings or inner most thoughts. So I can see why Ja Rule named his album after this book's title
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Alfred Johnson on December 9, 2012
Format: Paperback
I have often had reason, when speaking of my long and painful trek to Marxism many years ago now, to note that the polemics of the third section of the Communist Manifesto, where Marx and Engels skewer the various left-wing political tendencies of their day for their short-comings, that I had probably espoused all the tendencies met there, or their modern day equivalents. That said, I have also noted that as a member (a member in good standing, by the way, meaning merely having survived the cultural wars of the past forty years or so and still standing) of the generation of '68 I had run through all of the "theories" prevalent on the New Left (then New Left, now old and hoary with age) of the 1960s. They included such thread-worn "theories" as that the working class had then (and now by some new new left advocates) lost its central role (had sold out or been bought off in the vernacular of the times) as the vanguard for socialism, youth as a class was per se a revolutionary agent for change (perhaps best known in the "red" university premise), guerilla warfare (rural as in China, Cuba and many African countries and urban as in the Weathermen-like formations , and its various transformations, creating a second front for those rural struggles, just then, the Vietnamese Revolution, as the central fact of late 20th century revolutionary theory), and most importantly for the discussion here blacks, blacks as an oppressed minority in the United States were, without question, and without questioning, the vanguard of the socialist revolution. And, one way or another, torturously one way or another, constituted a nation, with all that implied for the right of national self-determination, rather than as a segregated caste at the bottom, and an adjunct of the main society.Read more ›
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