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Blood Oranges (A Siobhan Quinn Novel) Paperback


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Product Details

  • Series: A Siobhan Quinn Novel (Book 1)
  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Roc Trade; First Edition edition (February 5, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0451465016
  • ISBN-13: 978-0451465016
  • Product Dimensions: 8 x 5.4 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (41 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #399,857 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Praise for Blood Oranges:

"The New England setting is colorful and convincing, and Tierney populates it with a weird and splendid set of supernatural beings...[R]eaders are in for a memorably exhilarating and engaging experience."—Kirkus

"The first urban fantasy title (and first publication under the Tierney name) for Caitlin R. Kiernan (The Drowning Girl) brings an engagingly fresh perspective to well-trod territory...Colorful side characters and a fully realized setting make this a fast-paced series opener well worth checking out."—Publisher's Weekly

Praise for Caitlín R. Kiernan:

"One of our essential writers of dark fiction."—New York Times

"Deeply, wonderfully, magnificently nasty."—Neil Gaiman

"Caitlín R. Kiernan draws her strength from that most honorable of sources, a passion for the act of writing."—Peter Straub

"Caitlín Kiernan is a master of dark fantasy."—Holly Black

About the Author

Kathleen Tierney is the psuedonym for Caitlin R. Kiernan, the author of nine novels, including Daughter of Hounds, The Red Tree, and The Drowning Girl. She is a four-time nominee for the World Fantasy Award and a two-time nominee for the Shirley Jackson Award.

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Customer Reviews

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Caitlin R. Kiernan is one of the best authors around, period.
RougetAlex
I think the author tried to write a first person point of view book, but the person Siobhan was such a mess that the whole book was barely coherent.
Jerred D
A must read for anyone drawn to the darker edges of urban fantasy, this book is a book I can't stop thinking about.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

28 of 29 people found the following review helpful By Tyr Shadowblade (TM) VINE VOICE on March 25, 2013
Format: Paperback
This is the worst book Caitlin Kiernan has ever written. That being said, Kiernan, at her best, is one of the greatest writers of our time (i.e.: "The Red Tree", "The Drowning Girl," and even "Silk" which she disparagingly refers to as juvenilia). Apparently, after writing "The Drowning Girl", Kiernan wrote this dark YA styled story as a "palate cleanser" of sorts, and did not even wish to have it published under her own name, but her publisher insisted.

If I may be completely frank, I have read a LOT of hack work and fluff misrepresenting itself as "Dark Urban Fantasy," and Kiernan's diversion is far better than any of that rot . . . and she wasn't even trying. One of my dark secrets is that I kinda like the "Dresden Files" series by Jim Butcher, a NYT bestselling author, and "Blood Oranges" is actually better than several of the books in that series too.

For a YA book, it is pretty dark . . . young Quinn lives in abject squalor, shoots up, discusses orgasms, then kills people AND EATS THEM. A lot of folks simply will not get the "humor" in this book, as most of it clearly satirizes the way Dark Urban Fantasy has degenerated to mindless "Paranormal Romance." I enjoyed these subtle digs quite a bit.

Apparently, there will even be a sequel entitled "Red Delicious." From what I heard, Kiernan was under pressure to complete it by a deadlne, which she did, but was so disappointed with the final product she asked for a chance to rewrite it from scratch . . . and since she is so brilliant and awesome, her publisher was actually okay with that. I think "Red Delicious" will prove well worth the wait.

Caitlin is known for not only "dark" but atmospheric, timeless, brooding, and at times truly jarring prose.
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18 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Mary Lloyd on February 8, 2013
Format: Paperback
I have been a fan of Caitlin R. Kiernan's work for a long time so was excited when I learned she'd be penning a series under the pseudonym Kathleen Tierney. Blood Oranges is definitely a departure from Kiernan's usual style and I can understand why she'd want to separate the book from her other novels.

Blood Oranges is a riot to read. Yes the main character is a foul-mouthed, street-kid junkie with issues. Quinn sort of stumbled into the role of becoming a demon hunter but there's no way she can stumble her way out of it, especially now that she has become the creatures she hunts. After being bit by a werewolf and a vampire in the same night Quinn is now some sort of werepyre. She's still herself, only her addiction for junk has now been replaced with an addiction for blood.

This book has a lot of interesting characters spanning the paranormal genre but this book is most definitely not a paranormal romance. It's actually quite a refreshing read. Also there is a blurb from Amber Benson (Tara from the Buffy the Vampire Slayer tv series) on the cover, which raised the cool factor for me. If you're a fan of Buffy, or Tarantino films, and prefer your paranormal without all the lovey-dovey you're in for a treat with Blood Oranges.
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Sherry M. on February 8, 2013
Format: Paperback
Quinn is a main character with a distinctive voice, and while the book pokes fun at pararom conventions (a monster-hunter gets bitten by a werewolf and a vampire on the same night!) it's as fun a read as any of the no-nutritional-value books it mocks. I love pararom as much as I love junk food of the non-literary variety, and reading Blood Oranges is like a game of spot-the-trope. This book should be a crowd-pleaser both for fans who love the genre and readers who would normally never touch a pararom book.
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By J. Cruz on February 8, 2013
Format: Paperback
It seems that the purveyors and readers of run-of-the-mill urban fantasy and ParaRom weren't paying attention in Honor's English during the discussion of SATIRE. Caitlin R. Kiernan writing here as Kathleen Tierney has done so to make a delineation between her more serious oeuvre. Our anti-heroine Siobhan Quinn shows the World its ugliness as an addict, a survivor of child abuse and neglect, and as an outsider. If you want an interesting and sly take on the whole monster slayer trope check out this gritty confection.
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13 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Holly Hetrick on February 8, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
While not Caitlin R. Kiernan's usual style (hence the pseudonym), I enjoyed this book for the witty references and the fact that it made me laugh at the ridiculousness of the paranormal romance genre. It points out the things that I've wanted fiction to point out such as the invention of sunlight being lethal to vampires in Nosferatu and the ridiculousness of "sparkly" vampires. It is a brilliant satire of the "monster hunter" genre that has become so popular in recent years and honestly did make me laugh out loud, which is admittedly a difficult thing for me.

Maybe the humor will go over the heads of some, but that is not the novel's fault.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Syddon Vell on February 12, 2013
Format: Paperback
Another reviewer here noted that Blood Oranges reads like an attempt to satirize urban fantasy conventions that is written by someone who hasn't actually read much urban fantasy, and that's somewhat true. Despite the pen name, this novel feels much more like CRK's work than her previous novel did, and Blood Oranges has its moments, but like The Drowning Girl, it lacks the gorgeous language that makes a CRK novel what it is. The Author's Note suggests this is because of the narrator's lack of education, yet this same narrator knows all sorts of scientific terms and drops literary references like only an author or someone with a Ph.D. in English could. At times, this makes the novel feel uneven.

That said, this is a pretty good novel. It's not as good as The Red Tree or anything written before that, but that's because CRK is simply a much better novelist when she writes in third person. Her first-person narrators always wallow in "am I telling the truth or not?" This worked really well in The Red Tree, but following this same narrative question for two more novels has left this "what-is-the-truth?" theme so beaten that it's now little more than road kill. First-person narrators are by their very nature unreliable, so there's no need to bog down the novel with these metacognitive asides from the narrator about "the truth."

This novel would have been amazing if it had dispensed with the first-person narrator and given us a developed, interesting protagonist facing the same issues. Despite Quinn, who really is pretty boring despite how clever and cynical she thinks she is, most of the other characters in Blood Oranges are solid and well developed, even when they only appear briefly.
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