Blood Roses and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy Used
$2.29
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Good | Details
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Our goal with every sale is customer satisfaction, so please buy with confidence. Every order is shipped the same day or the next day. This is a used book, in good condition, that may show some signs of use or wear.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Blood Roses Library Binding – May 20, 2008

13 customer reviews

See all 8 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Library Binding
"Please retry"
$2.29 $2.29

Paper Towns by John Green
Catch up on this popular novel before it hits theaters on 7/24. See Kindle book

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Grade 10 Up—Block is known for her fantastical, edgy, and highly feminized stories of young women, and this book fits neatly into that mold. Blood Roses consists of nine loosely connected short selections focusing on elemental and magical changes in each character. In "Skin Art," straitlaced Elodie Sweet finds tattoos mysteriously appearing on her body as romantic tension—and obsession—builds between herself and an older tattoo artist. With each new tattoo, her perception of herself grows and changes, but she ultimately finds that the tattoos are only superficial and disappear as she realizes that she is not in love with the man. In "Wounds and Wings," Audrey finds a fairy whose wings have been cruelly torn off. She takes him home to nurse him to health and learns to see the similarity between his injuries and insecurities and her own. The characters walk a fine line between the mundane and magical. It is impossible to decide if they are sane or not, or if it even matters. Blood Roses, like Block's other books, brims with sexual suggestion that is meant for more mature teens. This short book will appeal to reluctant readers, though Block's fans will find it on their own.—Stephanie L. Petruso, Anne Arundel County Public Library, Odenton, MD
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Booklist

“What shall we do, all of us? All of us passionate girls who fear crushing the boys we love with our mouths like caverns of teeth, our mushrooming brains, our watermelon hearts?” Block’s latest book, featuring eight new stories and one reprint, explores female sexuality with wild poetry and a sense of vulnerability that extends to the book’s cover, a discreetly posed nude photo of the author. The stories, which read with brief, flashing intensity, are more like dark, fantastical dreams than developed narratives. Block combines elements used in her previous books—predatory adults, threatened girls, a natural world that both harms and heals, and the terrifying, infinite power of the imagination—to create strange, evocative scenes filled with archetypal fantasy characters, L.A. teens, and sly social commentary. In “My Mother Is a Vampire,” a girl’s mother, struggling in a youth-obsessed culture, drinks her daughter’s blood to stay young. In two of the strongest stories, girls’ bodies are dramatically transformed by the strength of their sexual desires. As disjointed as nightmares, the stories will startle, provoke, and fascinate many older teens, who may find reassurance in one character’s raw, closing message: “You are not fucked up. . . . Your world is fucked up . . . and you are just responding normally to its psychotic vibe.” Grades 10-12. --Gillian Engberg --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Library Binding: 129 pages
  • Publisher: HarperTeen (May 20, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 006076385X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0060763855
  • Product Dimensions: 7.1 x 5.5 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #5,501,214 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Francesca Lia Block, recipient of the prestigious Margaret A. Edwards Lifetime Achievement Award. has been publishing novels, short stories, essays, memoirs and poetry since 1989. Her work has been translated into many languages. Ms. Block lives in Los Angeles where she teaches writing workshops that are also available online.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By TeensReadToo on May 20, 2008
Format: Hardcover
On Francesca Lia Block's website, there are a bunch of words lumped together, reminding me of magnetic poetry that has been used to describe her work. I couldn't agree more with the words reviewers have used. The one word that kept jumping out at me while reading this was lyrical. I was looking for a word to describe what I thought about her newest literary novella, BLOOD ROSES, and that describes it perfectly. Surreal and dreamy would be good adjectives to use, as well.

The book is broken up into nine short stories. All of the stories deal with a transformation of some sort, whether it is physical or emotional. Not once in any of her stories is the magical element questioned - it is just accepted. My favorite story out of all of them is called Skin Art. Basically, it is about the all-consuming power of first love and how, after time has passed, it is not as great as once thought.

Easy to read, this little book sucks you in, especially if you are a fan of thought-provoking fantasy, as Ms. Block straddles the line between the worlds of magic and reality. The stories seem very personal, emotional; even, at times, irrational. You definitely can't argue with the quality of writing - Francesca Lia Block is a very good writer, but with that said she is not for everyone.

People that are into the art scene will enjoy her work, as well as those who like to analyze dreams, as the stories are rich in sensory detail. Hail to the queen of magical realism.

Reviewed by: coollibrarianchick
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Satia Renee VINE VOICE on October 14, 2008
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
In Blood Roses Francesca Lia Block does what she does well--writes evocatively, using poetic language to create a lush mood. Blending fantasy with reality, most of the characters in these short, short stories are young girls who live on the west coast of the United States. The tone and occasional reappearance of characters, from earlier stories in the text, result in a tight focus of mood and moment.

This works wonderfully in her novels but not quite so well in her short story collections. Because almost every story is told in the same voice, the stories barely stand out one from the other. Beautifully written, any one would stand out from another writer's short stories but it is hard to find one from this collection that stands out from the others.

Nevertheless, the images are so rich that it is hard to not recall them all as the protagonists from each story seek to find meaning. And Block, who is not afraid to address some of the more frightening aspects of adolescent reality, does so with a fairy tale elegance that cloaks the darkness in beautiful prose. In this, she is harkening back to the tradition of bedtime stories where children were taught to fear through stories. However, her stories are not meant to inspire fear but to offer healing of psychic and spiritual wounds.

So, although this is not my favorite of Block's many books, it is still superior to most young adult literature.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Trisha on August 12, 2008
Format: Hardcover
I adore Block's work. Although it sometimes seems very abstract, the imagery and flow of her words is absolutely gorgeous. My favorite story in this particular book was Skin Art.

That said, I wouldn't recommend this to people who weren't fans of Block already. In some ways, it's more difficult to read (although shorter) than her other works.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Devlin Rantz on March 3, 2009
Format: Hardcover
Blood Roses was a book I was highly anticipating, due to spending a hiatus away from reading for a while of any books, I wanted to get back into reading Block again.

The book, like most of hers, branch out and focus not only on one character, but a "red string" effect with a multitude of characters. This book was no different.

Though I have to agree it wasn't my favorite of the books I have read of hers, but it had moments where my heart melted just like in "Echo" and "Psyche In A Dress"

However this book hit a lot of dark spots, it focused on how dark a girl's heart can really be. And how bad things can be if your left to your own devices.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Emma on November 26, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Ms. Block's books are never heavy reads, but always enjoyable. They take me to a whole other place, filled with technicolour, magic, and her unique, poetic vernacular. I can't say they were very erotic, but still very beautiful. I liked how all the stories interconnected too; my favourite was the story about Berry.
In these stories you don't know what is real and what is fantasy... when I think it's both. Blending the two together is what Fransesca does best.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback
This short story collection always makes me sing the Tori Amos song of the same name when I pick it up.

A collection of magical/fairy-tale-esque stories of transformation, this is the usual adjective bath by Ms. Block. It's odd because I usually prefer books with strong characterization and Block's books seem to be more about concept--especially in her short fiction. In the first story--the title story, "Blood Roses," I found myself randomly crying over a poignant paragraph: "She wondered if when you died it was like that. If you still believed your body was there and couldn't quite accept that it was gone. Or if someone you loved died, someone you were really close to, would they be like a phantom limb, still attached to you?"

Mythical references popped up regularly--as soon as I saw Lucy and Rosie being offered pomegranate juice in a strange man's house, I smelled Persephone--and the dark and sort of creepy side of magic is found under every rock here. I got a little tired of the random insertions of "Here's this character, she looks like this, she does this glamorous thing and wears this other glamorous thing and she has a cool name. Now here's this character. . . ." In a way, depending on my mood, it kind of strikes me like sifting through random people's snapshots, so it's interesting, but usually when I'm reading a book I don't want to get attached to a snapshot and then have her not become a person.

Block also has a bit of a habit of ending stories abruptly when it seemed like they were building toward something. I don't insist on resolution, but I do like when they go somewhere and many of these stories went somewhere but stopped before they got there.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?