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The Blood Trilogy (Blood Feast / Two Thousand Maniacs! / Color Me Blood Red) [Blu-ray]

4.2 out of 5 stars 26 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

Herschell Gordon Lewis' pioneering "gore" films in deluxe special editions. First, Mrs. Fremont hires crackpot Egyptian cultist Fuad Ramses to cater a party--and he prepares a Blood Feast made from the grisly body parts of nubile young women. The world's first gore film. Then the Two Thousand Maniacs of a small Southern town celebrate the 100th anniversary of the Civil War by forcing a handful of Northerners to serve as "guests" in their macabre, blood-crazed fun and games. And when his girlfriend, Gigi, cuts her finger on a frame, maniacal artist Adam Sorg discovers a new shade of crimson that will make his artwork so special--human blood--in the shocktacular Color Me Blood Red.

Special Features

3 audio commentaries by Herschell Gordon Lewis and David Friedman

Outtakes

Carving Magic with William Kerwin and Harvey Korman

Blood Feast theatrical trailer

Two Thousand Maniacs theatrical trailer

Color Me Blood Red theatrical trailer

Galleries of exploitation art


Product Details

  • Actors: William Kerwin, Mal Arnold, Connie Mason, Don Joseph, Candi Conder
  • Directors: Herschell Gordon Lewis
  • Format: Multiple Formats, AC-3, Blu-ray, Color, Dolby, DTS Surround Sound, NTSC, Widescreen
  • Language: English
  • Region: Region A/1 (Read more about DVD/Blu-ray formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.78:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: NR (Not Rated)
  • Studio: Something Weird Video
  • DVD Release Date: September 27, 2011
  • Run Time: 233 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (26 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B0053TWVWI
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #20,543 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
I just got my blu ray in and popped it in the player, so excited to finally see these wonderful H.G. Lewis films in HD, but to my REAL shock and horror they have cropped the image at the top and bottom for that fake widescreen look and it really effects the picture! The picture IS otherwise brighter and clearer than the previous "Something Weird" dvd release but there is just too much cropped off at the top and bottom. For all you H.G. Lewis purists beware!
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Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
It would be easy to pass this up as being a package of movies that was put cheaply together for a quick buck if you didn't know better. Don't make that assumption.

These are three examples of early gore from the pioneers of the genre, Herschell Gordon Lewis and David F. Friedman. While not exactly Oscar-worthy, they have their place in cinema history. The transfers on the Blu-ray discs aren't exactly reference quality, but they're fine for these films, and probably far better than they ever looked on drive-in screens. In some scenes, you could argue they look TOO good. The main audio tracks are PCM mono.

BLOOD FEAST - If you ever wondered where modern horror started, look no further than this cult classic. A caterer puts together a feast using body parts of his victims. Filmed on a budget of $24,500 (according to Friedman in the commentary), it is one of the most horribly acted movies you will ever see...yet there's something appealing about this film even today. The gore, cheesy by today's standards, was like nothing ever seen before in its day. The movie became a sensation at drive-in circuits around the country and birthed a segment of cinema that simply hadn't existed previously.

TWO THOUSAND MANIACS - After making names for themselves with "Blood Feast", Lewis and Friedman made "Two Thousand Maniacs" with triple the budget. A small Southern town celebrates the anniversary of the Civil War by tricking some Northern tourists into town and killing them in various community events. Most of the actual residents of the shooting location were all too happy to participate in filming, which made the movie look far bigger than it was.

COLOR ME BLOOD RED - A frustrated artist can't find his color...until his girlfriend accidentally cuts herself.
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Format: DVD
Blood Feast

Herschell Gordon Lewis made Horror history with 1963's BLOOD FEAST, widely considered to be the first "gore" film. In the years before the MPAA, filmmakers were only limited from showing excessive nudity on-screen. With no rules preventing anyone in the movie industry from depicting gratuitous violence or horrifying bodily dismemberment, H.G. Lewis and business partner David F. Friedman embarked on a series of films that exploited these loose regulations in an attempt to compete with the major studio releases in the drive-in circuit. The two did not ease in to this newly established genre with just a few missing limbs or a severed head, but (literally) covered the screen in blood and butchery from start to finish. This simply had never been done before, and even to this day, BLOOD FEAST continues to serve as one of the most shocking and gruesome films in the genre.

Mrs. Fremont is throwing a dinner party for her daughter's engagement, so in order to impress her guests, she has hired the exotic caterer Fuad Ramses to put on an extravagant feast! What she doesn't know is that Fuad has worked up a special menu made from bits and pieces of the missing girls from around town, which he will be serving as the main course in an Egyptian blood feast to appease the goddess Ishtar!

PSYCHO, this is not; Lewis' listless direction shows all of the style and finesse of an early stag film (another genre with which he was fondly familiar). BLOOD FEAST tastefully implies nothing, and instead plasters the screen in one lurid image after another, using as few camera set-ups and shots as possible for the minimal amount of coverage provided.
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Format: DVD Verified Purchase
It wasn't that long ago that going to the movies was a different experience. There were few multiplexes, and most theaters showed double features. When you went to the movies, you had to clarify that it was a "walk-in" theater because drive-ins were a popular alternative. It was a time when there were many low-budget movies produced by minor studios and making limited runs; these were a more charming version of the direct-to-video schlock that is made nowadays. H.G. Lewis was pretty successful at these low budget movies, especially with horror: Lewis was a pioneer in the field of gory movies, producing grisly movies decades before Jason, Freddy and Michael would make it standard film fare.

The so-called Blood Trilogy is actually three separate movies; the name was given in later years when they were released and shown as a set in theaters. The first film is Blood Feast, the tale of a madman killing young women to prepare a cannibalistic feast in honor of Ishtar. Lewis's formula is often the more blood, the better, but often the actual act of violence isn't really shown, only the result. We see the villainous Fuad Ramses making his attack, and we see the dead body, but we rarely see the actual stabbing (or other act). By many standards, this is a pretty awful movie: the acting is amateurish and the writing and sets are not much better, but it (and its two companion movies) has an Ed-Woodish appeal to it: it's in that so-bad-it's-good category that easily develops a cult following. It is also pretty much the first truly bloody movie, so even if flawed, it is a breakthrough film.
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The Blood Trilogy (Blood Feast / Two Thousand Maniacs! / Color Me Blood Red) [Blu-ray]
This item: The Blood Trilogy (Blood Feast / Two Thousand Maniacs! / Color Me Blood Red) [Blu-ray]
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