Customer Reviews


18 Reviews
5 star:
 (7)
4 star:
 (10)
3 star:
 (1)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favorable review
The most helpful critical review


19 of 20 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars DM's True Musician Finds His Voice
Alan Wilder must have been a frustrated man while he worked in the background for Depeche Mode. Dave Gahan received most of the attention as the lead vocalist who was routinely festooned with women's underwear, like some gyrating Christmas tree for the screamers. Martin L. Gore was the band's songwriter, lyricist, and overall creative voice -- all decisions about the...
Published on December 9, 2004 by Erik Russell Olson

versus
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars An inkling of things to come...
Before Alan Wilder left Depeche Mode to focus all of his creative energy into Recoil, the ultimate result being the wildly ambient "Unsound Methods," there was "Bloodline," the album that was instrumentally still based in the dark synth pop origins of Depeche Mode, but compositionally still progressing towards the sound that would yield...
Published on March 23, 2000 by Algorhythm


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

19 of 20 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars DM's True Musician Finds His Voice, December 9, 2004
By 
Erik Russell Olson (Dublin, CA, United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Bloodline (Audio CD)
Alan Wilder must have been a frustrated man while he worked in the background for Depeche Mode. Dave Gahan received most of the attention as the lead vocalist who was routinely festooned with women's underwear, like some gyrating Christmas tree for the screamers. Martin L. Gore was the band's songwriter, lyricist, and overall creative voice -- all decisions about the band's sound eventually had to receive his blessing. Andrew Fletcher didn't help much, sticking around mainly just to maintain his friendship with Gore.

Meanwhile, Wilder was the true virtuoso of the band, mastering the piano, synthesizers, sequencers, drums, all while largely receiving little or none of the limelight for his seemingly limitless talent. Gore himself even admitted that Wilder was the real musician of the band, so it was no surprise that the albums released following Wilder's departure (Ultra and Exciter) relied heavily on production and backing musicians. It was Gore's insistence on a pop-oriented sound -- and Wilder's craving for something much more creatively fulfilling -- that led to Wilder's exit from Depeche Mode.

It is that experimental, decidedly non-pop sound which showed up on many excellent DM B-sides ("Memphisto," "Sibeling," "St. Jarna," "Agent Orange," and "Pimpf," to name a few). Listen to "A Question of Lust" and then "Christmas Island," for example. Gore favored the music heading in a more mainstream direction, while Wilder opted for something darker and more sinister. Guess who came out on top.

If you are a big fan of those creepy, moody B-sides I mentioned, you will be very happy with Recoil in general and more specifically Bloodline. The only two tracks without any vocals at all are "The Defector" (intriguing title -- how soon did it occur to Wilder that he might leave DM?) and "Freeze." "Defector" is cool, but "Freeze" is positively spellbinding. The layered, cyclical, ascending, hypnotizing effects of "Memphisto" and "Pimpf" are abundantly evident in "Freeze," and it plays out like the rightful heir to those overlooked masterpieces of the DM oeuvre.

The tracks which do use vocals are a little more spotty. Douglas McCarthy is suitably creepy in "Faith Healer," and the song effectively straddles the line between accessibility and experimentalism. Moby does not fare as well in "The Curse," in which he raps with an edge of social awareness. It's a little strange. On the other hand, Toni Halliday's contributions on "Edge to Life" and "Bloodline" are the perfect sultry touch on some already slick electronic music.

This is excellent mood music, better suited to the bedroom than to the radio. Of course, it is not Depeche Mode. If it were, it would have showed up on Violator, but evidently this was not the path Martin Gore wanted to take. Recoil is not for every DM fan, but if you appreciate those amazing B-sides I listed (most probably the work of Wilder himself), then you will find much to like here on Bloodline.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This Album Shows how Sequencers were meant to be used., October 9, 2000
By 
This review is from: Bloodline (Audio CD)
This album is so technically profiecient and clean, it's incredible. I am a Depeche Mode fan and this ranks well with any of their work. I was not particularly fund of his release following this one. (Unsound Methods) Along those lines, I am also a Nitzer Ebb Fan but the problem with Unsound Methods was it didn't even come close to technical proficiency of this earlier album. To me, it's easy to tell that a lot less work went into it. The Bloodline album showcases synthesizers and sequencers at their best and that's what makes it a phenomenal album to recon with. To me this older effort of Alan Wilder rivaled even Depeche Modes latest release, Ultra. It's too bad that it seems he will never improve upon this formula, but one group that is still continuing down this path is Heaven 17. If you enjoyed this album, Check out Heaven 17's Bigger Than America.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant and timeless!, November 6, 2005
By 
ebmAddikt (Portland Oregon) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Bloodline (Audio CD)
Alan Wilder is one of the music industry's most overlooked and under-appreciated musical artists. Not only does he possess great talent to write captivating music, he is also a master at the ar of engineering, mixing and producing. This combination of talents makes for some truely unique and mind-blowing recordings.

While Bloodline may not be the most recent or the most innovative of Alan's recordings, it is personally my favorite, not only because of it's great songs and diverse list of collaborators (such as Douglas McCarthy from Nitzer Ebb, Moby, and Toni Halliday from Curve), but also because of epic sentiment. Bloodline was released around the same time of Depeche Mode's Violator - of which Alan was still a member at the time - so you can find little elements of Violator in Bloodline too.

Alan has been busy lately, overseeing and re-mastering all of Depeche Mode's backlog CD's into 5.1 surround (yay!). He also has a new album coming out in July 2007 named 'subHuman'. Looking forward to it!!

At any rate, this review is about Recoil's Bloodline. If you've never heard it, and you like good electronic music...then you must own it! If you have the Bloodline recordings, and do not have a hard copy....why not buy *a new* one and show your support for one of the greatest recording artists of our time?
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars An inkling of things to come..., March 23, 2000
By 
Algorhythm (Maryland, USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Bloodline (Audio CD)
Before Alan Wilder left Depeche Mode to focus all of his creative energy into Recoil, the ultimate result being the wildly ambient "Unsound Methods," there was "Bloodline," the album that was instrumentally still based in the dark synth pop origins of Depeche Mode, but compositionally still progressing towards the sound that would yield "Unsound Methods" and the new "Liquid." The music is dark and mostly instrumental, producing more soundscape than song, with the exception of "Faith Healer" and "Edge to Life," two still exceptional songs. They indicated the "filmic" symphonic sound that Wilder would soon produce once free of the constraints of being in Depeche Mode, but needless to say the album does still suffer in comparison to his later work. The instrumentation mimics that of DM. The attentive listener will notice synthesizer sounds that were copied from "Violator" and "Music for the Masses," especially the closing theme "Freeze," a track that mirrors "Pimpf," "Memphisto," and "Sibeling." The intro to Curse even includes the breathing sample from "I Want You Now." This is understandable since Wilder was still in DM at the time, and the album is still a good piece of work, but in lieu of the expansive nature and superior musical quality of the later two albums, "Bloodline" fails to deliver. On its own, however, it's a listenable album. It's more for the dance/DM crowd than "Unsound Methods" or "Liquid." Toni Halliday's tracks are the best, and Moby's vocal on "Curse" is enjoyable, so...if anything listen to this album on its own merits. I heard this album AFTER hearing "Unsound Methods," so naturally I'm somewhat biased, but just remember that Alan Wilder was playing a different tune at the time of "Bloodline." It's a good album. Give it a listen.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The last of the Depeche Mode-era Recoil, February 23, 2004
By 
P. Bjel (Richmond Hill, Canada) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Bloodline (Audio CD)
In April 1992, this album was released, Alan Wilder's third-and as it would turn out-last Recoil release while in the band Depeche Mode. It was recorded right after the band's huge 'World Violation' tour, where they had all tasted the pinnacle of their efforts, reaching official stardom status, even though much more was still to come. In this brief lull, Wilder crafted the "Bloodline" album, utilizing guest vocalists for the first time (his previous two Recoil albums, "1+2" and "Hydrology" comprised long instrumental tracks with a haunting appeal, though they were not commercially-friendly-indeed, "Bloodline" was originally intended to be an instrumental album). The track listing goes as follows:
(01) Faith Healer (5:59)
(02) Electro Blues for Bukka White (8:58)
(03) The Defector (8:01)
(04) Edge to Life (6:08)
(05) Curse (7:04)
(06) Bloodline (6:48)
(07) Freeze (7:28) [this track was not included on the vinyl release]
The track "Faith Healer" was released as the album's only single, in March 1992, for good reason, as it is the one track that stands out in the album; sung by vocalist Doug McCarthy (of the band Nitzer Ebb), it has a catchy chorus and pulsing tone. "Edge to Life" and "Bloodline" are both sung by Toni Halliday (of the band Curve), though in hindsight, both Alan Wilder and his fans admit that her vocals were toned down a little too low, probably because, at the time, Wilder was more concerned with portraying the album's musical prowess than the contents of its vocals. "Curse" is sung, or 'rapped' by Moby, and is the album's most socially-aware-raising track. "Electro Blues" is a bluesy, electric pulse that is filled with the vocals of Booker T. Washington White (cousin of B. B. King) put through a filter and sampled into the track (an interesting remix of the song was later put on the Recoil single "Jezebel" in September 2000).
Fans of Recoil's previous two albums will find solace with this LP's two instrumental tracks, "The Defector" and "Freeze," though in my humble opinion, I prefer the former track to the latter. A few Depeche Mode-era samples, from songs of theirs like "I Want You Now," "Personal Jesus," "Enjoy the Silence" and, no doubt, others, have made their way into this LP.
All in all, it is a cool album, interesting not only for its musical qualities and in displaying the ever-heightening talent of Mr. Alan Wilder (and no other, except for the vocalists, of course), but also for its appearance in Depeche Mode's history, the last Recoil album churned out in this context. In 1993, the band made their album "Songs of Faith and Devotion" and undertook a draining tour soon thereafter, which frayed all of them and, upon its end, convinced Wilder that his vocation was to be found elsewhere.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Interesting independent project from former Depeche Moder Alan Wilder, with associated artists..., August 1, 2006
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Bloodline (Audio CD)
I first picked this up in the spring of 1992, after having heard on the radio that Alan Wilder, of Depeche Mode fame, had released an independent electronic-rock album.

Being a big Depeche Mode fan, I didn't exactly go for every track on this album. The radio-hyped "Faith Healer" sounds not just a little like some of the material on DM's "Music for the Masses", but the singing and lyrics were so distracting, I couldn't sink my teeth into it. "The Curse" also left me nonplussed; a sort of Depeche Mode 'rap' song that worked neither as Depeche Mode, nor as rap.

Still, in spite of these two tracks, I think the album is almost single-handedly rescued by "Edge to Life", a marvelous synth-rock piece that combines Wilder's synth smarts with terrific female vocals from Curve's Toni Halliday; the two collaborating deliciously on what is, for me anyway, the signature piece of the entire effort. If ever you wondered what would happen if Depeche Mode and Curve mixed it up, this is what it would sound like; and I think it sounds darned good!

Also notable were some of the offbeat and quirky pieces, like "Electro Blues for Bukka White" and "Freeze"; the latter being a thoroughly instrumental exploration, very similar in sound and style to the "Resource" track off of the soundtrack to the time-lapse documentary, "Koyaanisqatsi."

I recommend this disc to DM fans who might be looking to broaden their horizons a bit without stepping too far beyond familiar territory, and electronic and synth rock fans seeking a decidedly different listening experience, with very little bubblegum influence from the pop mainstream.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The last of the Depeche Mode-era Recoil, February 22, 2004
By 
Peter B. (Toronto, Canada) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Bloodline (Audio CD)
In April 1992, this album was released, Alan Wilder's third-and as it would turn out-last Recoil release while in the band Depeche Mode. It was recorded right after the band's huge `World Violation' tour, where they had all tasted the pinnacle of their efforts, reaching official stardom status, even though much more was still to come. In this brief lull, Wilder crafted the "Bloodline" album, utilizing guest vocalists for the first time (his previous two Recoil albums, "1+2" and "Hydrology" comprised long instrumental tracks with a haunting appeal, though they were not commercially-friendly-indeed, "Bloodline" was originally intended to be an instrumental album). The track listing goes as follows:
(01) Faith Healer (5:59)
(02) Electro Blues for Bukka White (8:58)
(03) The Defector (8:01)
(04) Edge to Life (6:08)
(05) Curse (7:04)
(06) Bloodline (6:48)
(07) Freeze (7:28) [this track was not included on the vinyl release]
The track "Faith Healer" was released as the album's only single, in March 1992, for good reason, as it is the one track that stands out in the album; sung by vocalist Doug McCarthy (of the band Nitzer Ebb), it has a catchy chorus and pulsing tone. "Edge to Life" and "Bloodline" are both sung by Toni Halliday (of the band Curve), though in hindsight, both Alan Wilder and his fans admit that her vocals were toned down a little too low, probably because, at the time, Wilder was more concerned with portraying the album's musical prowess than the contents of its vocals. "Curse" is sung, or `rapped' by Moby, and is the album's most socially-aware-raising track. "Electro Blues" is a bluesy, electric pulse that is filled with the vocals of Booker T. Washington White (cousin of B. B. King) put through a filter and sampled into the track (an interesting remix of the song was later put on the Recoil single "Jezebel" in September 2000).
Fans of Recoil's previous two albums will find solace with this LP's two instrumental tracks, "The Defector" and "Freeze," though in my humble opinion, I prefer the former track to the latter. A few Depeche Mode-era samples, from songs of theirs like "I Want You Now," "Personal Jesus," "Enjoy the Silence" and, no doubt, others, have made their way into this LP.
All in all, it is a cool album, interesting not only for its musical qualities and in displaying the ever-heightening talent of Mr. Alan Wilder (and no other, except for the vocalists, of course), but also for its appearance in Depeche Mode's history, the last Recoil album churned out in this context. In 1993, the band made their album "Songs of Faith and Devotion" and undertook a draining tour soon thereafter, which frayed all of them and, upon its end, convinced Wilder that his vocation was to be found elsewhere.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Little Bit of Everything, May 18, 1998
By A Customer
This review is from: Bloodline (Audio CD)
Funk, blues, rap, pop, soul, all wrapped up in an electric blanket. It's all very well-crafted, though a bit robotic-sounding. Still, "Bloodline" is worth the price of the album.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Bloodline, Recoil, May 27, 2010
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Bloodline (Audio CD)
Since I have all 12 Depeche Mode studio albums and had never really checked out Recoil yet, I figured I'd buy "Bloodline" since I heard that it was Recoil's closest work to DM. I can definitely tell the similarities, though there are some distinct differences.

The track that left the most immediate impression on me was "The Defector." It's a great instrumental piece bearing resemblance to Depeche Mode B-side "Kaleid," and it might be my favorite thing here. (Just goes on a bit long.) Also cool were the tracks featuring guest vocalist Toni Halliday--"Edge to Life" and title track "Bloodline". "Edge to Life" has the kind of spiritual feel reminiscent of "Condemnation," a Depeche Mode single released on "Songs of Faith and Devotion" a year or two later. "Bloodline" has more intensity than "Edge to Life" and is my preference of the two. Finally, "Freeze" is a very nice Philip-Glass-style instrumental piece, a special treat for fans of Alan Wilder's B-sides with Depeche Mode like "Memphisto" and "Stjarna."

Overall, I like "Bloodline." At the time of this review, I own 84 albums, and this is probably in my top 40. What makes me not give this album five stars is the sheer annoyance of some of the male vocals. Still, for Depeche Mode fans, this is an interesting, if not pretty good, album to check out.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Alan Wilder's incredible musical understanding, August 10, 2000
This review is from: Bloodline (Audio CD)
I am a BIG Depeche Mode fan, thus i bought Bloodline the year it came out - couldn't find Hydrology back then -. It is such an impressive piece of work. "Edge to Life" is one of the best songs that you can make love along. It includes lots of stuff from Depeche Mode, and things that Wilder would use later in his Recoil albums. Douglas McCarthy formerly from Nizter Ebb, includes a song here - buy Nitzer Ebb stuff too -. Wilder is like a shy electronic fella, he hangs around with the most talented people out there - Diamanda Galás, Flood, DM, Tony Halliday -, but still, has not made a huge hype from his stuff. That i admire from him, that and his incredible music.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

Details

Bloodline
Bloodline by Recoil (Audio CD - 1992)
Add to cart Add to wishlist
Search these reviews only
Send us feedback How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you? Let us know here.