Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Blowing the Blues: Fifty Years Playing the British Blues Paperback – July 1, 2004


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$61.46 $19.28

Best Books of the Month
See the Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Coffee Gives Me Superpowers
"Coffee Gives Me Superpowers"
An Illustrated Book about the Most Awesome Beverage on Earth. Learn more | More in Humor and Entertainment

Product Details

  • Paperback: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Clear Books (July 1, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1904555047
  • ISBN-13: 978-1904555049
  • Product Dimensions: 1 x 6 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,759,955 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Dick Heckstall-Smith was one of the first musicians to commute successfully between jazz and blues-rock. Known for his trademark playing with two saxes, he has always been a trailblazer with groundbreaking stints with Alexis Korner’s Blues Incorporated, the Graham Bond Organization and more recently the likes of Julian Bahula in Electric Dream. He was for many years the most sought-after saxophonist on the London scene. http://sonniekenney.tripod.com/dickheckstallsmith.htm

With a background as a professional theatre and blues musician, Pete Grant has been Dick Heckstall-Smith's friend and manager for the past three years. Pete's essay about Dick follows the maestro's original text: his achievements in the last 20 years; the musical highlights; why commercial potential remains unfulfilled.

Important Information

Ingredients
Example Ingredients

Directions
Example Directions

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
5 star
78%
4 star
22%
3 star
0%
2 star
0%
1 star
0%
See all 9 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Midwest Book Review on September 8, 2004
Format: Paperback
Most blues guides focus on American blues music: Dick Heckstall-Smith and Pete Grant's Blowing The Blues covers fifty years of playing British blues, includes cd with previously unreleased tracks, and provides insights into blues saxophone to accompany a blend of autobiography and British blues history. Add cartoons by Biff making comments on the life of a blues musician and you have a honest survey of the music scene of the British blues world.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Samuel B. King on February 22, 2005
Format: Paperback
Anyone remotely familiar with the British blues scene of the 60s and 70s will have heard Dick Heckstall-Smith, whether you are aware of his name or not. I'm halfway through this book and...what a treat! In his own words, Dick recounts his personal history as a musician growing up in the British Jazz scene of the 50s and the blues rock period of the 60s and beyond. In the process, he writes a veritable history of the British blues. Why? Because he was present during many of the key episodes of that history. In addition to his musical insight, DHS shares some stories of the road which sound so impossible that they just have to be true. Standouts are the tale of the "homemade stew", Jack Bruce's introduction to him and Ginger Baker's attempt to drive in a blinding snowstorm. The tales of his tenure in the Graham Bond ORGANization are worth the price of admission alone. DHS was a wonderful musician, inquisitive human being and a true ambassador of the British jazz/blues scene. This is a must read book. Rest in peace Dick.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Noel A. Hodda on December 9, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is a unique first-hand account of the birth of a genre of music and the birth (and subsequent demise) of two of the genre's flaming stars: The Graham Bond ORGANisation and Colosseum. Along the way we hear tales of many other musicians of the time, such as John Mayall, various early 'jazzers', Jimi Hendrix and more. As if that wasn't enough we also get the pre- and post-story of the author's development as a musician and a deep-thinking person. It's all told with an entertaining anecdotal-based ease that belies the often deep insights at work throughout the book (see the section devoted to Graham Bond and the causes of addiction for example). A great read and highly recommended. AND it comes with a cd with seven previously unreleased tracks, many from DHS's own in-situ live recordings. Thanks and kudos to Clear Books in the UK for re-issuing this valuable piece of writing (the original book was what is now the first part of this release, a book titled 'The Safest Place In The World') in such a great package.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Tom Mulhern on January 3, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Dick Heckstall-Smith was an amazing sax player, but after reading Blowing The Blues, I came away with the impression he was an interesting, funny guy. It's almost tragic how overlooked he is as a musician, but his "warts and all" explanation of his career, as well as the material added by Pete Grant, spells out what can go right and wrong in the world of music. For any fan of DHS or Colosseum, it's a nice view inside and behind the scenes.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Lewis Cowdrey on December 23, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Plenty about early UK blues and jazz. Lots of famous names and those not so famous. DHS was , per the recorded evidence, one of the greatest ensemble and backup saxes ever. This is exactly what a vocalist or band leader wants. Read the book and see what is meant by "playing for the song," or "make the singer happy." Then buy the Graham Bond stuff.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.