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Blown Covers: New Yorker Covers You Were Never Meant to See
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
on May 20, 2012
Format: HardcoverVerified Purchase
Blown Covers: New Yorker Covers You Were Never Meant to See

I have been a fan of the New Yorker covers for over fifty years. They are always pertinent, humerous, and intelligent. This book is particularly interesting because it gives you insight to the selection process. There are many reasons why a cover is selected or rejected and it takes a lot of discussion to make a proper decision. Any fan of the New Yorker magazine will enjoy this book and learn why the covers are so important.

I have a good sized library of books about the New Yorker magazine and this is a fine addition to my collection.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on September 13, 2012
Format: HardcoverVerified Purchase
If you like the modern New Yorker covers, this book will be interesting but not fascinating. If you like the old New Yorker magazine, do not buy this book. There's not enough good stories about the covers and there's not really enough rejected covers either. Yes, there's a couple of killer-bad taste covers that were rejected but over-all you say: 'so what'. The best part is a series of self caricatures from the cover artists themselves in the back of the book. The New Yorker magaine has such a long history and variety of covers...why do they only talk about the last 15 years.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on May 22, 2012
Format: Hardcover
Coming from an illustrator who wants to be on the cover of the New Yorker someday, it was great to see a book full of rejected illustrations from some of the greatest artists of our time. Sometimes you believe covers come out of divine inspiration and that they are once and done ideas. Mouly gives wonderful insight into PUSHING your sketches as far as you can and leaving the NYer to do all it can to tame your wild ideas into a cover. This book was filled with concepts that made the cover and others that just got away.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Format: HardcoverVerified Purchase
I have, I think, every book that has been published about The New Yorker, and this one was fun to read and look at, but was by its very nature more political than I prefer. Still, I am giving it 5 stars, hoping that future writers and editors will be encouraged to do even more books about my favorite magazine. It was fun to read about the selection process for the weekly covers, and reinforces a belief I have always had about how much fun it must be to work at the New Yorker, even when the cover depicts an area that wouldn't be described as "fun".

I also have the Rejection Collection books about cartoons that weren't used and am hoping for a book on the "spots" which are always fun. And the recent Postcard book of New Yorker covers is beyond great!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on May 22, 2012
Format: Hardcover
This is a wonderful book about what goes on behind the scenes at the New Yorker magazine. Being a longtime resident and subscriber, I was thrilled to see behind the curtain of what looks to be a fantastic job. Francoise certainly has the eye for talent and I love that she has made her work accessible to everyone with this book. One really gets a sense of what goes on between art director and illustrator.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon July 27, 2012
Format: Hardcover
I enjoyed The Rejection Collection: Cartoons You Never Saw, and Never Will See, in The New Yorker and was happy to see this coffee-table treatment of rejected *covers* by New Yorker art editor Mouly.

And there are a couple hundred covers here, in all stages of conception and finalization, well-reproduced and mostly in full color, organized into sections on Race/Ethnicity; Sex; Religion; Politics; Celebrities; Wars/Disasters; Taboos; and accompanied by commentary from Mouly and the artists about how time sensitivities (the news cycle), cultural sensitivities, and the right combo of clarity/subtlety combine to yay or nay a cover.

It's very good, my only quibble being that, contrary to the title and subtitle, it's actually as much about controversial covers that *were* published as about "blown" covers, and thus feels a little short. Otherwise, highly recommended.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
TOP 1000 REVIEWERon June 25, 2013
Format: HardcoverVerified Purchase
This book is a disappointment. Francoise Mouly, the editor, is a leftover from the unfortunate Robert Gottlieb/Tina Brown days at The New Yorker. Gottlieb and Brown didn't quite bring the venerable magazine crashing down but they brought it to its knees and part of their legacy is Francoise Mouly and it shows in this silly book. Yes, some of the rejected covers are offensive, and many are foolish and probably very embarrassing to the artists and virtually all the drawings are uninteresting.

Looking at who's represented here, you can see a pattern of favoritism and nepotism in Mouly's selection of cover artists. Why so much of Barry Blitt and Mouly's husband Art Spiegelman?

Give it a pass. The book is a piece of stale popcorn. It's not worth the money just to look at some bad drawings by her friends.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Format: HardcoverVerified Purchase
Francoise Mouly has done it again... Lets face it... we buy the magazine for the covers first. :-) They rarely disappoint, do they? This terrific book lets us in on the images that didn't quite make it for one reason or another, but are so cool that they needed to be seen & enjoyed anyway. I do, and I did... enjoy them, that is, and the stories behind them. This is one more NEW YORKER book that's EARNED it's space on my bookshelf. More-More- More!!!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Format: HardcoverVerified Purchase
It's not sausage making... I love getting a peek at the cover creating process. I was reading the New Yorker in my gym's hot tub and someone said that they love the magazine because it has subtlety when most everything is competing with exclamation points. Reading this book made me feel like magicians were sharing their magic tricks with me. I love it.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Format: Hardcover
While I don't read the magazine, I have always appreciated the covers of The New Yorker magazine. To me, they rank with Life and Saturday Evening Post magazine covers in terms of telling a story without needing a single word of text. Our library recently purchased Blown Covers: New Yorker Covers You Were Never Meant to See by FranCoise Mouly, and I finally got to the top of the hold list. It was an entertaining read that added a great deal of background information into how covers get chosen, how difficult it is to make a point with no text, and how, no matter what you do, you will always infuriate some part of the overall group that follows you. Definitely a number of lessons to be learned there...

Contents: Introduction - Covers Uncovered; Race & Ethnicity; Sex; Religion; Politics; Celebrities; War & Disasters; Is Nothing Taboo?; Biographies & Index

Mouly has been the art director for The New Yorker magazine since 1993, and needless to say, she's seen countless sketches and ideas for covers during that time. She has an area on her wall dedicated to the covers that made it, as well as great ideas that didn't get that far. One of her illustrator colleagues was looking over the various drawings and simply said "You have a book here." The result was Blown Covers.

On a superficial level, the book is interesting in that it shows various cover ideas (both fully illustrated and rough sketches) that were either chosen for an issue or held back for various reasons. Just sit back and enjoy the artwork. However, if you slow down and consider the explanations behind the decisions, the whole world of editorial artwork comes alive. Mouly sounds like she gives her artists a high degree of latitude and protection for ideas that are far from "politically correct". Those ideas and rough sketches have to be sold to her first, and then sold to the editorial board. Quite literally, some artwork was chosen five minutes before a cover had to be at the presses. Other very good covers were pulled at the last minute when a late-breaking story focused the world's attention in a different direction. The original cover quite often never makes it back into the mix, as the message is old news by then. The balance between message, meaning, impact, and emotion is precarious... especially when you can't use any words to lead people in the right direction. The image has to carry it all.

And here I thought it was just a drawing...

Blown Covers is a good read that destroys the "it's just a cartoon" mentality that most readers probably assume when they see The New Yorker on a newsstand. It's really so much more than that, and Mouly and her artists do an excellent job in showing you what really happens on a weekly basis when it comes to telling stories without words.

Disclosure:
Obtained From: Library
Payment: Borrowed
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