Blue Jasmine 2013 PG-13 CC

Amazon Instant Video

(1,387) IMDb 7.4/10
Available in HD
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Cate Blanchett stars as a former New York socialite teetering between her troubled past and a fresh start in San Francisco.

Starring:
Alec Baldwin, Cate Blanchett
Runtime:
1 hour 39 minutes

Available in HD on supported devices.

Blue Jasmine

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Product Details

Genres Drama, Comedy
Director Woody Allen
Starring Alec Baldwin, Cate Blanchett
Supporting actors Richard Conti, Glen Caspillo, Alec Baldwin, Charlie Tahan, Annie McNamara, Sally Hawkins, Daniel Jenks, Max Rutherford, Andrew Dice Clay, Tammy Blanchard, Kathy Tong, Ted Neustadt, Andrew Long, Laurena Allan, John Harrington Bland, Leslie Lyles, Glenn Fleshler, Brynn Thayer
Studio Sony Pictures Classics
MPAA rating PG-13 (Parental Guidance Suggested)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

The movie was very entertaining with great acting.
kathie keate
It felt like one of those deep and controversial conversations you've had with a friend that in the end was just a pointless waste of time.
Fritz Schindelbeck
Cate Blanchett did a great job and should have been nominated for an Oscar for her performance.
Joyann24

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: DVD
If you want to see this year's master class in screen acting, you need to watch Cate Blanchett's mesmerizing performance as Jasmine French, a delusional Park Avenue socialite wife in Woody Allen's 46th directorial effort, a sly, bicoastal update of Tennessee Williams' classic A Streetcar Named Desire. As the film opens, her impeccably dressed character has hit rock bottom after her financial wizard of a husband is arrested and her assets are liquidated. In the throes of a nervous breakdown, she arrives in San Francisco and moves in with her kind-hearted sister Ginger who lives a modest, blue-collar life in a tiny apartment on the edge of the Mission - on South Van Ness near 14th Street to be exact - with her two hyperactive sons. You can tell Jasmine is not only out of her element but quite judgmental about how her sister's life has turned out. The irony of Jasmine's patronizing attitude is that she is a habitual liar who is so angry about her destitute circumstances that she frequently talks to herself. The story follows the basic outline of "Streetcar" but takes some interesting turns, for instance, when she tries to better herself by taking computer classes while working as a receptionist at a dental office.

Allen has crafted his film into a clever juxtaposition of current and past events that feels jarring at first since it reflects Jasmine's precarious mental state but then melds into a dramatic arc which resonates far more than a straightforward chronology could have allowed. As a writer, he has become more vociferous in his dialogue without losing his wit.
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134 of 148 people found the following review helpful By L. Power TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on October 5, 2013
Format: DVD
I bought a ticket to this movie knowing absolutely nothing about it, and almost immediately as it began I knew I was watching a Woody Allen movie.

I cannot say exactly why this is so. Perhaps it was the richness of the character study, and the fact that Allen writes so excellently for female characters. In any event, Cate Blanchett's character, and her brilliant performance of this down on her luck former socialite married to a conman husband played by Alec Baldwin, may be the best female character performance you will see on a movie screen this year, and Blanchett's performance is probably the most Oscar worthy I have seen so far.

Set in San Francisco in the present day it unfolds the complex relationship of two sisters, one upper class but fallen on hard times, and her working class sister who makes working class choices. Because it unfolds in a non linear fashion it appears to dip randomly into different events over a period of about 15 years or so, and we understand why the sister is working class.

One of the themes of the movie is honesty, and facing reality, and Jasmine makes choices that seem oblivious to it. She fibs and tells little lies, at one level self deceptive, and at another deceptive of others. We may not like her for this, but if you're like me, I felt tremendous compassion for her, even loved her in spite of everything, which is not often I feel that way about a character. She suffers from severe anxiety, and the events she has to undergo take a toll on her. One particular choice she makes has particularly severe repercussions, yet in the moment we fully understand it.

I think it is fair to say moving to Europe and making films there has been wonderful for Woody Allen.
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147 of 163 people found the following review helpful By Stephen Quinn on July 28, 2013
Format: DVD
Isn't that what we want from Woody? Yeah, it's his best work in some years. One of those films where he manages to withdraw his own personality to a distance, where there's no character obviously speaking the "Woody" part. That part's been done over the years with varying results by Kenneth Branagh, Will Ferrell, Larry David, and others. But when he vanishes all together, when there's just his characters, speaking in all their poignant screwed-up humanity, who needs the nebbish wise-cracking about how meaningless life is?

Some of the critics seem to see this movie as a scathing indictment of capitalism in general, Wall St in particular, an unbridgeable gap separating its tony, well-to-do characters and its scruffy middle class ones. What it actually is about is the perils of living a life based on pretense and deception, where the only ones who claim happiness in the end are those comfortable in their own skin, no matter how modest their means. Cate Blanchett is by turns, heart-breaking and appalling in her narcissistic ravings. Equally memorable in a very different part is Sally Hawkins, the sister whose world Jasmine descends into, bringing the sort of moral and comedic chaos we've come to expect from the master. (Woody previously used her to great effect in a small part in Cassandra's Dream).

I feared going in, having read that this was among Woody's darker visions, that there would be little to like in its characters, that their own self-absorption would keep the audience at arm's length. Nothing could be further from the truth. It is in his darker works .
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