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296 of 318 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Woody's Sharply Rendered Update of "Streetcar" Anchored by Blanchett's Brilliant Blanche-Like Turn
If you want to see this year's master class in screen acting, you need to watch Cate Blanchett's mesmerizing performance as Jasmine French, a delusional Park Avenue socialite wife in Woody Allen's 46th directorial effort, a sly, bicoastal update of Tennessee Williams' classic A Streetcar Named Desire. As the film opens, her impeccably dressed character has hit rock bottom...
Published 15 months ago by Ed Uyeshima

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Umm... has Woody ever been to San Francisco?
I would have given this movie 5 stars, had it not been set in San Francisco. Having been born and raised in San Francisco myself (my highschool was in downtown San Francisco at the intersections of Ellis & Gough) the characters were not believable as San Franciscans. It is wishful thinking that the disconnect could be explained by Ginger and Chili being transplants to...
Published 11 days ago by Erik Smith


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296 of 318 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Woody's Sharply Rendered Update of "Streetcar" Anchored by Blanchett's Brilliant Blanche-Like Turn, August 3, 2013
This review is from: Blue Jasmine (DVD)
If you want to see this year's master class in screen acting, you need to watch Cate Blanchett's mesmerizing performance as Jasmine French, a delusional Park Avenue socialite wife in Woody Allen's 46th directorial effort, a sly, bicoastal update of Tennessee Williams' classic A Streetcar Named Desire. As the film opens, her impeccably dressed character has hit rock bottom after her financial wizard of a husband is arrested and her assets are liquidated. In the throes of a nervous breakdown, she arrives in San Francisco and moves in with her kind-hearted sister Ginger who lives a modest, blue-collar life in a tiny apartment on the edge of the Mission - on South Van Ness near 14th Street to be exact - with her two hyperactive sons. You can tell Jasmine is not only out of her element but quite judgmental about how her sister's life has turned out. The irony of Jasmine's patronizing attitude is that she is a habitual liar who is so angry about her destitute circumstances that she frequently talks to herself. The story follows the basic outline of "Streetcar" but takes some interesting turns, for instance, when she tries to better herself by taking computer classes while working as a receptionist at a dental office.

Allen has crafted his film into a clever juxtaposition of current and past events that feels jarring at first since it reflects Jasmine's precarious mental state but then melds into a dramatic arc which resonates far more than a straightforward chronology could have allowed. As a writer, he has become more vociferous in his dialogue without losing his wit. He doesn't pull punches when he showcases confrontations between his characters, whether it's between the two sisters, men and women, or people from different classes. Hostility can come in flammable torrents or in thinly veiled remarks. That Allen moves so dexterously in tone is a testament to his sharp ability in drawing out the truth in his actors. Blanchett is a wonder in this regard because there is something intensely fearless in her approach. Unafraid to lose audience sympathy for her character, she finds an innate sadness in Jasmine that makes us want to know what happens to her next. She also mines the sharp, class-based humor in Jasmine's struggles with one highlight a hilariously executed scene in a pizza restaurant where she explains to her confused nephews to "Tip big, boys".

The rest of the cast manage effective turns. Alec Baldwin plays Jasmine's swindler husband with almost effortless aplomb. Sally Hawkins brings a wonderful looseness to Ginger, Stella to Blanchett's Blanche, and finds a level of poignancy in her character's constant victimization at the hands of her sister as well as her brutish, blue-collar boyfriend Chili, played with comic fierceness by Bobby Cannavale in the Stanley Kowalski role. In a conveniently conceived role, Peter Sarsgaard gets uncharacteristically breezy as Dwight, a wealthy, erudite, and matrimonially available State Department diplomat who appears to be the answer to Jasmine's prayers, while Allen casts two unlikely comics in about-face roles - Andrew Dice Clay as Ginger's defeated ex-husband Augie and Louis C.K. as Al, an amorous suitor who brings Ginger a few moments of romantic salvation. Allen's European sojourn appears to have freed him up with the movement of characters in scenes and Javier Aguirresarobe's (Vicky Cristina Barcelona) camerawork complies nicely. The San Francisco locations bring a nice geographic change to Allen's storytelling, and he only uses the Golden Gate Bridge in a long shot once from the Marin side. This is Allen's best work in quite a while, and Blanchett is the ideal muse for his tale.
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141 of 155 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of Woody's best, October 5, 2013
This review is from: Blue Jasmine (DVD)
I bought a ticket to this movie knowing absolutely nothing about it, and almost immediately as it began I knew I was watching a Woody Allen movie.

I cannot say exactly why this is so. Perhaps it was the richness of the character study, and the fact that Allen writes so excellently for female characters. In any event, Cate Blanchett's character, and her brilliant performance of this down on her luck former socialite married to a conman husband played by Alec Baldwin, may be the best female character performance you will see on a movie screen this year, and Blanchett's performance is probably the most Oscar worthy I have seen so far.

Set in San Francisco in the present day it unfolds the complex relationship of two sisters, one upper class but fallen on hard times, and her working class sister who makes working class choices. Because it unfolds in a non linear fashion it appears to dip randomly into different events over a period of about 15 years or so, and we understand why the sister is working class.

One of the themes of the movie is honesty, and facing reality, and Jasmine makes choices that seem oblivious to it. She fibs and tells little lies, at one level self deceptive, and at another deceptive of others. We may not like her for this, but if you're like me, I felt tremendous compassion for her, even loved her in spite of everything, which is not often I feel that way about a character. She suffers from severe anxiety, and the events she has to undergo take a toll on her. One particular choice she makes has particularly severe repercussions, yet in the moment we fully understand it.

I think it is fair to say moving to Europe and making films there has been wonderful for Woody Allen. In an interview he said that his previous movies were critically acclaimed but commercially unsuccessful. Now he has made a series of outstanding movies, and written brilliant roles particularly for women.

I cannot claim to love all of them, but Vicky Cristina Barcelona was excellent and Penelope Cruz won an Oscar for her performance. Match Point is probably my personal favorite starring Scarlet Johansson and Jonathan Rhys Meyers, about an upwardly mobile ambitious tennis coach, and what may be a perfect murder. Midnight in Paris was dreamy and sentimental, and won an Oscar for best screenplay. Woody Allen has been nominated a staggering 23 times for an Academy Award winning four times, three times for Best Original Screenplay, and once for Best Director of Annie Hall.

Actors who worked with him have also won Oscars. Remember Mira Sorvino for Mighty Aphrodite, and Michael Caine for Hannah and Sisters.

As someone who lives in San Francisco, I can say that he makes it look almost better than the reality, and a beige BMW can do wonders to enliven the surroundings.

It seems to me that like a good wine, Woody just gets better with age, and easily maintains his excellence with this movie.

I think most people will enjoy this movie, and I hope this was helpful.
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151 of 167 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Hilarious and heart-breaking!, July 28, 2013
By 
Stephen Quinn (Huntington Beach, Ca) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Blue Jasmine (DVD)
Isn't that what we want from Woody? Yeah, it's his best work in some years. One of those films where he manages to withdraw his own personality to a distance, where there's no character obviously speaking the "Woody" part. That part's been done over the years with varying results by Kenneth Branagh, Will Ferrell, Larry David, and others. But when he vanishes all together, when there's just his characters, speaking in all their poignant screwed-up humanity, who needs the nebbish wise-cracking about how meaningless life is?

Some of the critics seem to see this movie as a scathing indictment of capitalism in general, Wall St in particular, an unbridgeable gap separating its tony, well-to-do characters and its scruffy middle class ones. What it actually is about is the perils of living a life based on pretense and deception, where the only ones who claim happiness in the end are those comfortable in their own skin, no matter how modest their means. Cate Blanchett is by turns, heart-breaking and appalling in her narcissistic ravings. Equally memorable in a very different part is Sally Hawkins, the sister whose world Jasmine descends into, bringing the sort of moral and comedic chaos we've come to expect from the master. (Woody previously used her to great effect in a small part in Cassandra's Dream).

I feared going in, having read that this was among Woody's darker visions, that there would be little to like in its characters, that their own self-absorption would keep the audience at arm's length. Nothing could be further from the truth. It is in his darker works .Cassandra's Dream,Match Point,Crimes and Misdemeanors) that he crafts his most endearing and enduring characters. Highly recommended.
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19 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Blue Jasmine: A woman on the verge of a nervous breakdown, January 21, 2014
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2013 has undeniably been an incredible year for female leading performances. It’s going to be very hard for the Oscar voters to pick just one. However, one performance from the summer that nobody has forgotten is gaining momentum with each passing award show leading up to the Oscars in early March.

I was lucky enough to see “Blue Jasmine” in the theater last summer, before all of the awards hoopla began. I suppose I simply never got around to writing a review on it. That’s my own fault. Rewatching “Blue Jasmine” on DVD this afternoon made me realize just what a gem this film was, and how realistic and true to life it is. We rarely see something this honest, this bracingly adult in American cinema. Thank goodness for Woody Allen.

Truthfully, I don’t care for Woody Allen as a person, but it’s an undeniable fact that he makes incredible films. He’s gone off the rails and made a few subpar pictures, but even subpar Allen is still better than what you might see at the movie theater most of the time. “Blue Jasmine” represents a return to form for the director, who has been in the business for over sixty years. It’s a fresh and fearless character study that proves he still has stories to tell.

Jasmine (Cate Blanchett) leaves her swanky Park Avenue life after her husband, a Bernie Madoff type (Alec Baldwin) is jailed for embezzling millions of dollars. Even though Jasmine is broke, she still manages to get a first class plane ticket to see her sister Ginger (Sally Hawkins), and her boyfriend (Bobby Cannavalle) who she isn’t particularly fond of. Jasmine stays with her sister and her children, in their modest apartment, and struggles to find work and generally make sense out of what her life has become.

Jasmine certainly has varying mental illnesses, although it’s never clear to the viewer what is the root cause of Jasmine’s downfall. She’s constantly drinking and mixing prescription medication, but it appears her body is used to this. Her real mental illness doesn’t have one root cause. It really is all sorts of things. It’s mentioned that she had been through a psychiatric facility of some kind after a nervous breakdown, and it’s clear, with every passing moment, that she may be on the verge of another.

Her sister is happy in her humble little life, which really disgusts and enrages Jasmine. She is horrified that her sister has “settled” for a life so plain and devoid of everything that made her happy. The two are polar opposites, but our leading lady never quite understands that.

The plot is essentially an update on “A Streetcar Named Desire”. Jasmine is reminiscent of the 1950’s housewife whose husband has abandoned her, and has nary a skill to fall back on. Always walking around in gorgeous Chanel jackets and drinking her Stoli martinis (with a twist of lemon) it’s obvious she is desperate to reclaim the lavish lifestyle that she once had. Ginger has always relied on men to bring her happiness, and in a way, so has Jasmine. Both ladies need to learn to live with what they have become individually, because it’s hard to rely on a relationship or a marriage to keep a person happy.

Her life has been simply swept out from under her. Through flashbacks, we understand Jasmine’s story more deeply. At the core, this film is about what a person does after their life has fallen apart. Allen has written such a rich character in Jasmine, and no actress other than Blanchett could have played her. The character doesn’t require an actress of great range (she’s crazy at the start and crazy at the end), but does require an actress who understands how precise and layered this character is.

"Blue Jasmine" is not a comedy, and it doesn’t leave the viewer feeling all warm and fuzzy at the end. It certainly has its moments of comedic brilliance, but it’s definitely a drama, more than anything. Jasmine is not a happy person, and her story isn’t necessarily a pleasant one. But it’s certainly a ride worth taking.

Grade: A+
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21 of 27 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Golden Woody, December 7, 2013
This review is from: Blue Jasmine (Amazon Instant Video)
Allen is evolving and ageing superbly, portraying intense characters and vivid but realistic situations. He confirms in Blue Jasmine his great vein for narration, and the unique skill of being able to merge comedy and drama like no other, and perhaps better than ever before. In fact this movie is a continuous push and pull of emotions, where every moment is masterly planned and balanced.
Blue Jasmine is an elegant modern day tale about a Park Avenue woman who is unable to cope with reality. Whether in the pretentious and comfortable life of New York's high society alongside her rich husband and friends, whether in a simple life in San Francisco trying to start over, Jasmine seems to be addicted to denial and evades every bit of truth about her life, absolutely unable to take up any responsibility.
The cast is high profile and just perfect. They all deliver a superior performance, and Cate Blanchett is simply phenomenal.
The script is very well written and the movie majestically directed. The usual great soundtrack rounds this to a definite 5* in my book.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Woody in original mood - a return to form confirmed, September 24, 2014
This review is from: Blue Jasmine (DVD)
In the late `70s and `80s the name `Woody Allen' was always the hallmark of a high quality product. Even his serious films which at the time were badly written up by critics now seem highly accomplished. I saw Interiors (1978) and Another Woman (1988) recently and found them both extraordinary. The last 20 years have been less kind to our reclusive schlemiel from the Bronx. The period 2001-2011 in particular saw an all-time career low with dross like The Curse of the Jade Scorpion (2001), Hollywood Ending (2002), Anything Else (2003), Scoop! (2006), Cassandra's Dream (2007) and You Will Meet a Tall Dark Stranger (2010). On the bright side there was always the odd spark of creative genius and I'm sure posterity will be kind to Melinda and Melinda (2004), Match Point (2005), Vicky Cristina Barcelona (2007) and perhaps even Whatever Works (2009). Midnight in Paris (2011) saw Woody really return to the big-time with a bang - both critics and audiences were suitably wowed, and now after the slightly less impressive To Rome with Love (2012) we have a truly classy product indeed in the shape of Blue Jasmine (2013).

To get at what makes Blue Jasmine so good perhaps one can start by stating what the film is not. It is definitely not a comedy, though there are odd one-liners which hit the spot. It is not one of Woody's Bergman or Fellini-inflected serious metaphysical meditations on the nature of good and evil, or art, or anything else for that matter. It definitely is a wonderfully pointed, sharply focused portrait of the pit-falls of upward-mobility in America's class system. I have always felt that in the past Woody has depicted a one-dimensional America which is solely rich, privileged, upper middle class, white, well-cushioned and altogether too pleased with itself. When Woody's characters suffer it's often really hard to care knowing as we do that they are protected from the realities of the real world. For example, the worst that can happen will be that a character has to cancel a month's subscription to the Met opera or that they might have to move from a large Manhatten apartment into another slightly less-large Manhatten apartment. In Blue Jasmine for the first time Woody tells us that being rich and enjoying the trappings of upper-middle class existence isn't necessarily a good thing. A person can be spoiled, misdirected, warped, robbed of integrity if he/she gives in to all the material come-ons that are proffered. That's exactly what happens to Jasmine (Cate Blanchett) whose fast-lane existence is brought crashing down by the revelation that her husband Hal (Alec Baldwin) is a crook and that everything they have has been in effect stolen.

The film starts with Jasmine returning to San Francisco to stay with her sister Ginger (Sally Hawkins) who has never escaped her working class surroundings and is about to marry a mechanic named Chili (Bobby Cannavale). Jasmine's snobbery collides with Ginger and Chili's straight up honest working class ethics in a series of memorable scenes which are by turn funny, horrific, touching and uncomfortable. The story of her life is skillfully related in flashbacks from these scenes of her struggling to come to terms with her straightened circumstances. In the past Woody has tended to patronize the lesser privileged (I'm thinking especially of characters like the poor yoga instructor in Husbands and Wives), laughing at them, rather than with them. Here, Ginger, her ex-husband Augie (Andrew Dice Clay), Chili and his friend are all intensely sympathetic characters whose lives are blown askew by the arrogance, the snobbery and the self-centered materialism that Jasmine exudes at ever turn. Critics have quite rightly praised Blanchett's Oscar-winning performance, and it's true, she truly captures the vileness of her character. More to the point, she also has us feeling sorry for her, especially in a scene when she catches up with her estranged step-son Danny (Alden Ehrenreich) and realizes exactly how far she has gone wrong. Woody's screenplay is shot-through with social insight and shows a deep understanding of Jasmine's vulnerability. I believe this is a first for him to explore a female character so deeply and so convincingly. Established Woody territory has always been marriage, relationships, the neurotic artist at odds with the world, etc, but a true female character-piece has so far lain unexplored. All credit then to the extraordinary chemistry that is clearly felt here between the writer/director and his muse. A pro-working class, anti-materialist female character piece: Blue Jasmine is that oxymoron in terms - an original Woody Allen picture. May the great director live to make many more of them.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Tip Big, Boys..., September 5, 2014
By 
markus king "markus" (Winston-Salem, NC United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Blue Jasmine (DVD)
Perhaps inspired by a late-night viewing of A Streetcar Named Desire, Woody Allen creates his own Blanche DuBois for the 21st century in Jasmine French, a New York socialite who has lost everything- including her mental stability- in a series of misfortunes and self-inflicted tactical errors.
Allen's Blue Jasmine is an engaging (if flawed) journey down some of the territory covered in Streetcar, with variation. To say Cate Blanchett dominates the film is severe understatement. To watch Blanchett breathe life into what is ultimately an unpleasant character is a marvel to watch- every gesture, every nuance, perfectly timed, capturing the perfect balance of Jasmine's desperation, fear, pretentious posturing and ultimately, mental downward spiral. She's pitiful, appalling and at times hilarious (ex. an outstanding scene in a pizza joint where Aunt Jasmine, "babysitting" her young nephews, espouses some very confusing bits of advice, the most memorable being "tip big, boys...").
She deserved an Oscar and she got it.
As usual, Allen has assembled an expert supporting cast, peppered by a couple of left-field choices, most notable of which is Andrew Dice Clay, surprisingly effective as Jasmine's bitter ex brother-in-law.
The film has a few drawbacks. Jasmine may seek refuge with her sister in San Francisco, but the change of coast doesn't really register because many of the characters we encounter there (particularly of the working class) look, sound and act like transplants from New York or Jersey. The narrative is bumpy at points, particularly during the second act, which depict Jasmine's half-hearted efforts to adjust to her fall from grace. And while Allen can still conjure up engrossing characters and endow them with wit and character that is usually interesting, the dialogue is fun but not always believable.
However, this is a another overall latter-day triumph for Allen (I'd say his third so far, after Match Point and Vicky Christina Barcelona) and a watershed moment in Blanchett's career.
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30 of 41 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Sailing Into the Rocks, October 15, 2013
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This review is from: Blue Jasmine (DVD)
One can take and savor the brilliant, angry "Blue Jasmine" at different levels.

As you will read many places, it's a brilliantly acted character study of Jasmine French (Cate Blanchett), one of two adopted sisters who left college before completing her anthropology degree to marry Hal Francis (Alec Baldwin), a man clearly destined for big things. As Hal's wife, Jasmine enjoys luxury homes in Manhattan and Southampton, extravagant jewelry, designer clothes, lovely vacations and the prestige that comes with being a leading hostess and fundraiser for various New York charities. She plays the part to perfection with her cultured voice and manners and subtle but exquisite taste while turning a willfully blind eye to anything that might be unsavory about Hal, whether it's his business practices or his philandering. When Hal goes to prison after it turns out his wealth is built entirely on scams, Jasmine loses everything, even her son Danny whose bitterness at his father's downfall drives him to drop out of Harvard and disappear. Carrying a Louis Vuitton suitcase and the clothes on her back, Jasmine flies to San Francisco to join her sister Ginger (Sally Hawkins) and try to build a new life for herself. Ginger lacks Jasmine's ethereal looks and chameleon-like adaptability and has settled for a life Jasmine looks down on, working as a clerk in a Mission District grocery store, bringing up two boys from her first marriage (which failed after Ginger and her first husband lost all their money in one of Hal's scams) and dating the volatile but passionate auto mechanic Chili (Bobby Cannavale). The narrative shifts in time from Jasmine's haphazard present-day efforts to start over in San Francisco and the upheaval she causes in Ginger's life to flashbacks of her life with Hal and the events that lead to his downfall, but never confuses the viewer. Jasmine, who has no practical skills other than being a rich man's wife--the woman cannot even operate a computer--tries to maintain a tether to sanity, sort of, while chasing Xanax with vodka. But having been cast completely adrift from the only adult world she has ever known, she is truly lost at sea.

There is humor to be found in "Blue Jasmine," but it's bitter humor. I suspect that's because Jasmine is at another level a metaphor for what's going on in the United States. As Jasmine and Hal cavalierly push Ginger and her first husband Augie (Andrew Dice Clay in a surprisingly adept turn) out of the way when they visit New York and then cost them their shot into the middle class, wealthy capitalists whose fortunes are built not on manufacturing goods or providing services but moving money around and sending jobs offshore are breaching their part of the social contract. The middle class continues to shrink, and the gap between extreme wealth and barely surviving grows ever wider. The wealthy may throw money at "the losers" in the form of charity or grants to charter schools, but damned if they'll pay their share of taxes or concern themselves with decent wages. And, putting aside the question of whether Jasmine deserves her fate, in showing Jasmine's efforts to work and go to school to "make something of herself" after the complete wreck of her world, the movie shows those whose purchase is steadily weakening or those who never had a purchase in the first place blaming themselves for failing in a system that is stacked against them. I don't think it was a scenic accident that much of the movie is set in San Francisco, a city where high-tech wealth is notoriously pushing middle class and working families out of the way.

It hurts to watch "Blue Jasmine." I think that's the idea.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Blue Jasmine, March 3, 2014
By 
mARTa hari (St. Louis, MO, USA) - See all my reviews
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Cate Blanchett gives an Oscar-worthy performance in this drama by Woody Allen. All the other players did a fine job as well.

The reason I did not give a 5-star rating? Woody is, as usual, out of touch with middle class Americans. I feel like he makes all of his characters who don't live in NYC or have unlimited funds to spend on 'the good life' are treated simplistically and most often depicted as low-class without a cultured bone in their bodies. Even Peter Sarsgaard's character, who had "class" - was totally unrealistic - he was a government employee who is redecorating a huge beautiful home on the ocean and doesn't plan to occupy the house for several years while he lives in Vienna? Give me a government job like that!!!
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8 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great movie! Very Good Story, Excellent Casting and Acting, February 7, 2014
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I am such a critic when it comes to movies and TV shows.. and love to pick them apart for most every reason... Not that I'm qualified at all mind you, but just like everyone I have my opinion. It is rare when I have nothing to complain about, but this movie gave me nothing. I like flashback movies and this one was very well done. I was confused at one point when the sister's husband suddenly was no longer around without explanation, but it reconciled itself as the movie progressed. Watching Cate Blanchett go from privileged society maven, blessed with "good genes" and obviously entitled to the good life, to being lost, troubled, and verging on a complete total breakdown as her world crashes around her, was a real roller coaster of a ride. She deserves the awards she is receiving. All the characters were very well casted and gave great perfomances. Hats off to Woody Allen for putting it all together, I really liked this film.
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Blue Jasmine
Blue Jasmine by Woody Allen
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