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Blue Is the Warmest Color Paperback – September 3, 2013


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 160 pages
  • Publisher: Arsenal Pulp Press; Mti edition (September 3, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1551525143
  • ISBN-13: 978-1551525143
  • Product Dimensions: 0.5 x 7.2 x 10.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (141 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #34,401 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Julie Maroh, who was just 19 when she started the comic, manages to convey the excitement, terror, and obsession of young love-and to show how wildly teenagers swing from one extreme emotion to the next ... Ultimately, Blue Is the Warmest Color is a sad story about loss and heartbreak, but while Emma and Clementine's love lasts, it's exhilarating and sustaining." -Slate.com

"A beautiful, moving graphic novel." -Wall Street Journal

"Delicate linework conveys wordless longing in this graphic novel about a lesbian relationship." <—New York Times Book Review (Editor's Choice)

"Blue Is the Warmest Color captures the entire life of a relationship in affecting and honest style." -Comics Worth Reading

"A tragic yet beautifully wrought graphic novel." -Salon.com

"Love is a beautiful punishment in Maroh's paean to confusion, passion, and discovery ... An elegantly impassioned love story." -Publishers Weekly (STARRED REVIEW)

"A lovely and wholehearted coming-out story ... the illustrations are infused with genuine, raw feeling. Wide-eyed Clementine wears every emotion on her sleeve, and teens will understand her journey perfectly." -Kirkus Reviews

"The electric emotions of falling in love and the difficult process of self-acceptance will resonate with all readers ... Maroh's use of color is deliberate enough to be eye-catching in a world of grey tones, with Emma's bright blue hair capturing Clementine's imagination, but is used sparingly enough that it supports and blends naturally with the story." -Library Journal (STARRED REVIEW)

"It's not just the French who have a better handle on sexy material than Americans -- Canadians do, too ... Who's publishing it? Not an American publishing house but by Arsenal Pulp Press, a Canadian independent." -Los Angeles Times

"A deeply compelling story ... Maroh displays tremendous insight into the highs and lows of a young girl's journey of self-discovery as she moves from adolescence into adulthood." -Lambda Literary

"A hymn to love." -Le Figaro

"A sensitively told narrative." -Tetu Magazine

About the Author

Julie Maroh is an author and illustrator originally from northern France. She studied comic art at the Institute Saint-Luc in Brussels and lithography and engraving at the Royal Academy of Arts in Brussels, where she still lives. After self-publishing three comics collections, her French-language graphic novel Le bleu est une couleur chaude was published by Glénat in 2010; it won several awards, including the Audience Prize at the Angoulême International Comics Festival, Europe’s largest.

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Customer Reviews

Saw the movie & wanted to read the actual graphic novel.
Ashley Patterson
Both stories are beautiful and I recommend that everyone should read it.
angel goss
Blue is the warmest color is a beautiful coming out story.
wifey0417

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

45 of 45 people found the following review helpful By Slefcool on September 13, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I have never been so in love yet so heartbroken by the same story. It really is a poetic story about a girl accepting herself. And the hopes of an eternal love. Perfection. Really I recommend it to anyone, lesbian or not. It helps you realize love is not something defined by gender, but by what is in your heart.
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28 of 28 people found the following review helpful By Macadania on October 2, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
My only complaint is that it's too short, but only because I burned through those pages incredibly quickly.
The artwork is so well done, and the simple techniques Julie Maroh uses to carry the emotion and the unfold of the story keeps you glued to the pages. The romance between the two main characters is so palpable. Recommended for anyone seeking an LGBTQ read, or an amazing story about the ups and downs of coming of age love and passion.
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32 of 33 people found the following review helpful By James Donnelly VINE VOICE on October 28, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Now that Julie Maron's BLUE IS THE WARMEST COLOR is coming to theatres in a feature film that not only won the very prestigious Palme D'or at this year's Cannes Film Festival, and that it was smacked by the MPAA with the dreaded NC-17 rating for its explicit sexual content, and that there is an ongoing war of words between the film's two leads and its director, it should generate enough publicity for not only people to see the film, but to also hopefully discover this remarkable graphic novel.

Simply enough, the novel, written and drawn by Maron, is about a fifteen-year-old girl Clementine who is doing her best to be a "normal" young girl. She dates a senior at her high school, she studies for her exams, and she has the "right" friends. Until one moment of one day, as she's walking down the street, she passes a beautiful older girl with dyed blue hair, and she cannot get this girl out of her mind. The blue-haired beauty invades her dreams with shocking sensual and sexual imagery, and Clementine can't understand what these feelings mean. She just CAN'T be gay. She refuses it, and in that refusal, her passion for this mystery girl grows. As she sneaks out one night to be with her best friend, Valentin, who is a young gay man, they go to a gay bar, and Clementine meets the mystery girl. Her name is Emma. And from then on, Clementine, no matter how hard she tries, she can no longer deny the feelings of love and lust she has for Emma. But once they finally realize who they are to each other, all the other parts of Clem's life start to spiral out of control. Her parents refuse to accept their daughter's deviant lifestyle, as do her straight friends. Soon, all she really has is Emma, and for a even a short time, that's more than she ever thought possible.
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30 of 31 people found the following review helpful By Maggie on October 26, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Buy. The. Hard. Copy. You're going to want this for your bookshelf, and as others have said the Kindle version is wonky.

I don't write reviews for my purchases often, but I had to make an exception for this one. Far too short of a story, but every panel is just masterful - you'll be hanging on to every word and carefully-drawn gesture by the first couple pages. Julie Maroh takes you on an emotional, heart-rending journey like no other graphic novel I've read ever has, and when you close the cover you'll be wondering when it was exactly that you got sucker-punched in the gut. This book brought emotions - both painful and wonderful - to the surface for me that I haven't felt in years, and for that I'm both astounded and eternally grateful to the author. Regardless of how you identify yourself, you will feel this story in your bones.

I already know the new movie won't live up to the book (because when do they ever, really?), but it's reassuring to know that Maroh's work is getting proper respect and recognition internationally. Outstanding.
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16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Yong Wei Chong on November 15, 2013
Format: Paperback
I am cynical enough to usually not bother with books/music/films centred around LGBT relationships (or any other minority group, for that matter). It is usually difficult to create fiction in that genre without playing to the gallery, sounding contrived, self-indulgent, or disengaging to a larger demographic. Like (presumably) many readers picking up the English translation just published in October 2013, my curiosity was piqued by the runaway success of its Palme D'or-winning film adaptation.

Given that Blue is the Warmest Color is centred around a same-sex relationship between a teenage girl and an older girl with all the stereotypes of a butch lesbian, it would have been extremely easy for the book to be susceptible to the shortcomings mentioned above. Instead, what Maroh has produced is a first-rate graphic novel that transcends demographics.

At 160 pages, with at most 4-5 panels per page, it's really more of a long comic than a full-fledge graphic novel. The artwork is charmingly raw and amateurish (Maroh was 19 when she started drawing Blue), and the narrative is economic and transparent. And yet, the characters are crackling with life - when the protagonist Clementine falls in love, you too, will want to root for her, and when her heart shatters, so will yours.

Blue is often referred to as a lesbian graphic novel, but 'Clem' never identifies as a lesbian in spite of her great love for Emma, and it is clear from her heterosexual encounters in both adolescence and adulthood that she probably isn't one. But her sexual orientation isn't the most pertinent issue in this book.
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