Buy New
$13.94
Qty:1
  • List Price: $17.99
  • Save: $4.05 (23%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Want it Monday, April 28? Order within and choose Two-Day Shipping at checkout. Details
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Blueberry Girl Hardcover


See all 9 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from Collectible from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$13.94
$7.48 $1.61 $25.00

Frequently Bought Together

Blueberry Girl + Instructions + Fortunately, the Milk
Price for all three: $32.52

Some of these items ship sooner than the others.

Buy the selected items together

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Big Spring Books
Editors' Picks in Spring Releases
Ready for some fresh reads? Browse our picks for Big Spring Books to please all kinds of readers.

Product Details

  • Age Range: 4 - 8 years
  • Grade Level: Preschool - 3
  • Hardcover: 32 pages
  • Publisher: HarperCollins; First Edition edition (March 10, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0060838086
  • ISBN-13: 978-0060838089
  • Product Dimensions: 10.3 x 10.4 x 0.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.8 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (104 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #35,454 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

In a magical blessing for unconventional girls, Gaiman (The Graveyard Book) addresses the ladies of light and ladies of darkness and ladies of never-you-mind, asking them to shelter and guide an infant girl as she grows. Help her to help herself,/ help her to stand,/ help her to lose and to find./ Teach her we're only as big as our dreams./ Show her that fortune is blind. Sinuous, rococo lines—the flowing hair, drooping boughs, winding paths that inspired the pre-Raphaelites—spread their tendrils throughout Vess's (The Ladies of Grace Adieu) full-bleed spreads, potent mixtures of the charms of Arthur Rackham, Maxfield Parrish and Cecily Barker's flower fairies. An Art Nouveau–ish font in a blueberry color compounds the sense of fantasy. On each page a different girl—short, tall, white, brown, younger, older—runs or jumps or swims, accompanied by animals meant to guard and protect her. Fans of Gaiman and Vess will pounce on this creation; so too will readers who seek for their daughters affirmation that sidesteps traditional spiritual conventions. All ages. (Mar.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From School Library Journal

PreS Up—Gaiman and Vess worked together on Stardust (HarperCollins, 2000), the award-winning fantasy that became a film in 2007. One can count on them for a fresh approach to the conventions of a genre. This New Age "prayer" for a yet-to-be-born child is no exception, although the combination of a picture-book format with concepts that require adult understanding may cause confusion or boredom in youngsters ("Keep her from…./Nightmares at three or bad husbands at thirty,/…. Dull days at forty, false friends at fifteen-"). Visually, the book also struggles with a split personality. One scene, in which animals peer at a girl in jeans and dreadlocks, is rendered in watercolor, defined by clean outlines, for a contemporary, realistic look. Another view of naked babies sleeping in flower petals is created with a hazy focus, calling to mind Jessie Willcox Smith or Elsa Beskow's Peter in Blueberry Land (Floris, 1988). The dedication indicates that this poem was written for a pregnant friend; it seeks to ward off all sorts of fairy-tale trouble: "Ladies of light and ladies of darkness and ladies of never-you-mind…. Keep her from spindles and sleeps at sixteen/Let her stay waking and wise." The "ladies" are draped in clouds and cloaks, sunsets and rainbows. The racial characteristics, hair color, and age of the girl change from page to page, presumably for an "everygirl" effect. This may resonate with people purchasing baby presents, as Seuss's Oh, the Places You'll Go! (Random, 1990) strikes a chord at graduation. The card, however, should read "Mother."—Wendy Lukehart, Washington DC Public Library
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

More About the Author

I make things up and write them down. Which takes us from comics (like SANDMAN) to novels (like ANANSI BOYS and AMERICAN GODS) to short stories (some are collected in SMOKE AND MIRRORS) and to occasionally movies (like Dave McKean's MIRRORMASK or the NEVERWHERE TV series, or my own short film A SHORT FILM ABOUT JOHN BOLTON).

In my spare time I read and sleep and eat and try to keep the blog at www.neilgaiman.com more or less up to date.

Related Media


Customer Reviews

The illustrations in this book are beautiful and the words are amazing.
Jeryl L. Oneal
"This is a prayer for a blueberry girl..." is the beginning, and it is one of the best new baby blessings I have ever found.
L. Adams
I purchased this book as a baby shower gift for my sister-in-law who is having a daughter.
M. Reynolds

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

70 of 71 people found the following review helpful By Everett A. Warren on March 19, 2009
Format: Hardcover
I am reluctant to give this book up.

It's Neil Gaiman, and that means words: good words. It's Charles Vess, and that means art: beautiful art.

It's also for girls and women and probably other feminine creatures, and I don't qualify for any of those titles.

However, my daughter... now, for my daughter, this is the perfect gift. Its inspiration and encouragement will be there for her, give her something to look through and keep in mind when I'm not right there to say all the sorts of inspirational and encouraging things a father can say to his daughter. Maybe, when she reads it, she will smile and think kindly of all the times I've said something similar, and maybe, just maybe, she won't roll her eyes like she would when I say those things...

She's nearly a teenager now, and the only problem I really see with this book is that it wasn't around a decade or so ago so I could read it to her over and over through the years...
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
44 of 45 people found the following review helpful By Lichen on November 12, 2009
Format: Hardcover
Blueberry Blessings For Your Wild Child, a review of Neil Gaiman and
Charles Vess' Blueberry Girl, by Lichen June

Lovers of art and lovers of whimsy,
lovers of words, the magical kind
this is a review for a Blueberry Girl
a tale from Neil Gaiman's mind

A book filled with prayers and hopes for a child
to guide and watch over her play
to protect her from troubles and woes of all kinds
add kindness and delight to her days

Words can be blessings, words can be curses
when spoken with the firmness of truth
Neil's words have intent, filled with love and bright purpose
to protect a child's trust and her youth

Lovers of dreams, lovers of nature
lovers of mysteries told
this is a rave for a Blueberry Girl
for teaching her to be brave and be bold

The pictures are beautiful, vibrant and strong
watercolor to dazzle the eyes
the verses enchant the young and the old
at turns graceful and really quite wise

Buy this book for your loved ones to grow on
to imagine, share and inspire
to teach the dance of great joys and deep sorrows
the balance her life will require

Lovers of sunlight, lovers of starlight
lovers of "shadows that fall"
this is rejoicing that Blueberry Girl
is here to be enjoyed by us all

Thanks Charles Vess for your love of the natural
Neil Gaiman for your love of this child
you've both interwoven vast talents to create
a present most wondrous and wild

Truth is a gift we must find for ourselves
"precious and rare as a pearl"
but it comes just a little bit easier now
with a gift like the Blueberry Girl

[...]
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
44 of 45 people found the following review helpful By Jennifer Newport on March 11, 2009
Format: Hardcover
The lilt of the rhyme, the excellence of the message for girls and future women, the gentle, beautiful illustrations...these are the reasons that I'll be buying this book for many new moms and young girls. This simple, short poem/story uses good sense, good balance, and good vocabulary. I'm not much of a book reviewer, but, as they say, I know what I like. This goes into the same category as "Oh, The Places You'll Go" as a go-to book as a gift, with a special emphasis on girls. It was clearly written and illustrated by people with a loving respect for the women in their lives. I didn't look at how much of the book is available in preview, but even if the whole book is there, it's still one that I'm glad I have in hardcover...it will be shared, and shared, and shared.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
133 of 149 people found the following review helpful By Mariana Chaffee on January 16, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Ladies of Anapest, Ladies of Iamb
Lightly your feet skip along
Here is a lilt for a Blueberry Girl,
A wish written into a song.

Oh, we all wish our babes to be
Both good and kind, to have
Courage and honor and joy.
We wish all these things for
Our Blueberry Girls,
And we wish just as much for each Boy.

I've purchased this book
For my Blueberry Girls,
Now grown into Ladies of note.
Glorious women,
Well set on their paths,
They fill both my dreams and my hopes.

Oh Ladies of Doggerel, Ladies of Rhyme,
Of Metaphor, Image and Trope,
Here is a song for a Blueberry Girl,
But I'm Nearing the End Of My Rope.

Ladies, you whisper, you sing, and you chant,
You haunt me awake or a-dream.
Ladies, dear ladies you're driving me mad:
Get out of my head or I'll SCREAM!
3 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
19 of 20 people found the following review helpful By STK on March 19, 2009
Format: Hardcover
I just had to take one look at the sample page and I was completely captivated by the beautiful language and the amazing illustrations. I've already given this book away as a gift four times.

The prayer for the Blueberry Girl contains well-wishes that every little girl everywhere in the world should be blessed with. And I dare say these lines will be uplifting and inspiring even for some not-so-little girls.

I also love the illustrations. They are enchanting and intricate, with many colourful details that are just waiting to be discovered. It's a perfect book for mothers and fathers, grandmothers and grandfathers reading with and to their little girls.

I am certain that this will turn into one of those magical books that stay treasured and beloved for a life-time and beyond.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Product Images from Customers

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search
ARRAY(0xa3e77864)

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?