Blues Masters - The Essen... has been added to your Cart
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by -importcds
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Shrinkwrap may be renewed, no visible damage on disc or booklet. Jewel case may have cosmetic damage, online codes for possible online content are expired or missing. Shipping time 5-21 business days.
Sell yours for a Gift Card
We'll buy it for up to $0.75
Learn More
Trade in now
Other Sellers on Amazon
Add to Cart
$11.99
& FREE Shipping on orders over $35.00. Details
Sold by: Fulfillment Express US
Add to Cart
$18.70
& FREE Shipping on orders over $35.00. Details
Sold by: MEGA Media
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Color:
  • Blues Masters - The Essential History of the Blues
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
  • To view this video download Flash Player
      

Blues Masters - The Essential History of the Blues


List Price: $16.96
Price: $9.99 & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details
You Save: $6.97 (41%)
Only 6 left in stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
15 new from $7.69 7 used from $4.99
Amazon Price New from Used from
DVD
"Please retry"
1-Disc Version
$9.99
$7.69 $4.99
$9.99 & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details Only 6 left in stock. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Blues Masters - The Essential History of the Blues + The Search for Robert Johnson + Deep Blues: A Musical Pilgrimage to the Crossroads
Price for all three: $27.35

Buy the selected items together


Editorial Reviews

Born on the plantations of the Mississippi Delta, the blues is America's root music. Few performances of the early masters were ever captured on film, but those that were are profoundly insightful and entertaining. Son House, one of the earliest legends, sits alone with his dobro, his large hands attacking the strings and the thunder of his voice filling the room. In the only known performance of Leadbelly, he stands by himself, legs bowed and eyes ablaze as he renders his tune. Bessie Smith, Mamie Smith, and Ethel Waters, the earliest divas, pour their hearts into their songs and take the music to new levels of popularity. Big Bill Broonzy creates an irresistible guitar shuffle that reverberates to this day, Roy Milton rocks the house and Jimmy Rushing gives the blues a Count Basie beat. Ida Cox and Big Mama Thornton bring their own rhythms to the blues, while Billie Holiday makes it fine and mellow. Muddy Waters and Big Joe Turner pave the way for rock 'n' roll and the blues finds classic interpreters in the modern expression of Joe Williams, Buddy Guy, Jimmy Witherspoon, and B.B. King. Tracks: Leve Camp Blues, Pick A Bale O'Cotton, St. Louis Blues, Lord, Lord, Lord, Harlem Blues, Hey, Lawdy Mama, Take Me Back Baby, Quicksand, Guitar Shuffle, Four Day Creep, Fine And Mellow, Hoochie Coochie Man, Shake, Rattle, and Roll, Going to Chicago, Ain't Nobody's Business, Darlin' You Know I Love You

Special Features

None.

Product Details

  • Actors: Leadbelly, Bessie Smith
  • Format: Multiple Formats, Black & White, Color, Dolby, NTSC
  • Language: Italian (Dolby Digital 5.1), English (Dolby Digital 5.1)
  • Subtitles: Italian
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: NR (Not Rated)
  • Studio: Rhino
  • DVD Release Date: May 28, 2002
  • Run Time: 103 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000065U3M
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #64,456 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

102 of 111 people found the following review helpful By "marcel_diallo" on November 9, 2002
This documentary does what so many others on Black Music failed to do, it discusses the music in the context of black struggle in America. The reason this DVD was such a breath of fresh air to me is because I purchased it after returning a documentary (American Roots Music) that did the exact opposite. Where American Roots Music teases the viewer with one or two seconds of it's "rare footage", Blues Masters shows rare sessions with Son House, Leadbelly, Bessie Smith and many more virtually uncut. Where American Roots Music attempts to handle the music as if it exists in a vacuum; Blues Masters doesn't separate the music from the people who created it. The latter even makes mention and shows footage of self-determined Black leaders such as Marcus Garvey and Father Divine, who both were very influential among common Black folks of the time. It discusses the "Racist Regime of America" and it's deep mistreatment of Blacks and alludes to the fact that this deep seated oppression and pain had to be an element of what actually drove Black folks to create the blues in the first place. This DVD is a must have. Buy two copies, just in case one of your friends decide to borrow it and never give it back.
3 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
36 of 38 people found the following review helpful By Q on May 8, 2006
Verified Purchase
This is an absolutely fantastic DVD of historic Blues performances. There are COMPLETE (not clips) song performances by many great Blues greats including Leadbelly, Son House, Bessie Smith, Muddy Waters, B.B. King, and several others. The performance by Leadbelly is galvanizing. All of the clips are highly entertaining, many of them in unusual formats, such as the imaginative Jimmy Rushing dramatization of his song. Jazz-blues performances by performers such as Billie Holiday and Count Basie are also included. In between the performances, the narrator tells about key episodes in African-American history and the history of the Blues. Accompanying the narration are historic photos, video clips, and more music. As a college teacher, I find this an ideal video for classes on African-American culture and literature.

Unlike many documentaries, there are NO talking heads, NO pretentious "musicologists" boring us with their large vocabularies. The heart of this video is the music and the cultural background. Kudos to the producers of this excellent video. All producers of music history films should be forced to view this model music documentary.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
23 of 28 people found the following review helpful By B.D. Rigg on December 30, 2004
Verified Purchase
This DVD is NOT dedicated to Blues history. It will give you an overview of what was happening politically in America from the late 1800's to today and what music was popular with Black Americans. It includes Jazz and Swing as well as Blues. I liked the footage of Leadbelly, Billie Holiday, and others. I did not like that it only briefly mentions Robert Johnson. No real history of the Blues here. I would only recommend this DVD to anyone who wants an American history lesson to learn about sharecropping, how Black Americans served in the military, etc. It does a good job of covering Black history.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
35 of 45 people found the following review helpful By D. B Pepper on February 29, 2008
This is the worst Blues DVD I've ever seen. Many essential points to understanding the history of the Blues are missed: Mamie Smith recording the first Black vocal song with the word "Blues" that became a huge hit ("Crazy Blues"), the subsequent popularity of Bessie Smith, Blind Lemon Jefferson becoming the first male Blues star in the Race Records industry, the birth of electric Blues that was necessary when blacks moved north and needed to amplify music in order to be heard in huge crowds, the birth of Rock 'N' Roll around 1954, and the Country Blues revival during the early 1960's. Facets of the terrible documentary which should have been taken out were the footage of Kennedy during the Jimmy Witherspoon song, which was simply idiotic and without reason (not to mention the documentary's failure to state that Witherspoon was covering a song Bessie Smith had popularized), the excessive talk of Blues constantly being associated with the struggle for Civil Rights (many Bluesmen's daily activities were not in line at all with morality), the mentioning of the Beatles and Michael Jackson being heavily influenced by Blues (this is plain absurd), and associating Aretha Franklin with Sarah Vaughan (they were separated by three decades). The Muddy Waters footage was terrible, as they selected one of the worst Muddy performances I've ever seen. There was no effort to fix up the sound quality of not just the performances, but also the narrator's statements, despite the DVD coming out in 1993, and then being touched up during the current decade. In addition, Babe Stovall was not a hugely popular performer during the 1920's, as the DVD states. The closing footage of B.B. King is from the early 1960's, so why was it shown after the narrator talked about B.B.Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Alan Hosp on April 6, 2007
Verified Purchase
Yes, I understand why the U.S. History lesson applies to the hisory of the Blues BUT: Did we really need to see video clips of JFK's presidency & his assassination as background to Jimmy Witherspoon's "Ain't Nobody's Business"? Was it misrepresentation to use late 1970's film footage to introduce Muddy Waters in the late 50's segment? Imagine my surprise to find Clifton Chenier, the king of Zydeco, listed as a Blues artist. Did they have to use the guy that recorded voiceovers in his bathroom for the Army's V.D. training films as the voiceover for this?

All I'm saying is, It could've been better.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Forums

There are no discussions about this product yet.
Be the first to discuss this product with the community.
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
Blues Masters - The Essential History of the Blues
This item: Blues Masters - The Essential History of the Blues
Price: $9.99
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?