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6
votes
I know this is an older question but I'll offer my 2 cents in case other buyers have this same concern. I too was wondering about the 'leftover' grounds stuck in the machine. So, every 2 weeks or so, I grind up 1 Tbls. of dry, uncooked rice on the coarsest setting. This works wonders at clearing out any old grounds as well as any oils that may be left behind, thus eliminating the possibility of rancidity. Then, when you next want to grind coffee beans again, just throw in 1 teaspoon of beans and run them through to clear out any white dust left from the rice cleaning. Dump it out and proceed as usual. Also, be vigilant about cleaning the grinder once a week or more by removing the upper burr and brushing everything out thoroughly, including turning the machine upside down over the sink and tapping it a few times to dump old grounds stuck inside. And don't forget to brush out the chute as well. I never store any beans in the hopper. They will get stale in a matter of hours doing that. The 4 mortal enemies of coffee are: Light, Heat, Moisture & Air. Keep them in an airtight container until you want to brew some coffee. Then you'll have a fresh brew every time.
Nov 18, 2013 by shrinking footprint
1
vote
I don't set it on the finest setting but pretty close to that. For espresso, you want the grind to be fine enough that as the water goes through it extracts the most flavor but not so fine that it becomes mud and the water doesn't go through well. If you have an espresso machine at home, you will want to play with the grind a little. The grounds should be well packed and not have excess moisture in them when the extraction is complete. If there is moisture left in the grounds, you will need to adjust.
Nov 9, 2013 by Miss Kritchel
1
vote
I'm sure Bodum would be happy to sell you one. A small glass canning jar should fit in its place and work just fine too, though.
Aug 10, 2013 by C. J. Hanson
1
vote
Not sure. My grinder just got clogged last week for the first time, but I think it was because of moist beans while on espresso mode. We keep our beans frozen, and I think the beans got damp from condensation. I tossed the beans and I've had no trouble since.
Dec 2, 2013 by Jose Luis Caceres
0
votes
I had to do it yesterday. My husband tried grinding very old beans (as it turned out) and almost killed our grinder. I watched a couple excellent YouTubes on cleaning the Bodum and took it apart, prying out the rock-like beans caught in the blades, vacuuming everything very well. Once you take off the hopper off, the insides pull straight up, easily. Hope this helps.
May 20, 2013 by Mary J. Oxrieder
0
votes
I'm buying one myself, but will take it apart before first use just to see what could damage it. I suspect that the buyers who have problems are running the unit too long on too fine a setting, expecting performance of an $400 grinder. More expensive grinders are designed with heavier gears made of steel instead of plastic and better heat dissipation so they can run forever even on espresso settings. Such are the tradeoffs in designing a $100 burr grinder.
Nov 19, 2012 by Michiel Kappeyne
0
votes
http://www.bodum.com/us/en-us/shop/prodlist/274/ Is the US Spare Parts page and jars with lids are: USD 9.00 Excl. taxes plus shipping Color: Black 01-10903-01-32, Lime Green 01-10903-565-32, Red 01-10903-294-32 & Off White 01-10903-913-32
Apr 20, 2012 by Gordon Lawrence
0
votes
Conical burrs
Apr 6, 2014 by EMONT
0
votes
How the coffee looks after grinding can be deceptive. The real test is how it brews. For example, with pour over, e.g. Hario V60, you want the process to complete in a certain time frame (depending on amount you're brewing). So if it's taking too long, your coffee is too fine (takes longer to pass through). If it's pouring through too quickly, your grinds are too coarse (less resistance). With your coffee maker, you can experiment. Set it for the middle and brew your normal amount. Take notes. Try again and adjust finer or coarser and compare. It's chemistry, so you'll have the amount of beans, machine's water temp and pour over speed relatively constant. Use the formula of 60 grams of coffee to 1000 grams of water as a basis. Weigh the water in the pot (tare the container, of course) and then have fun experimenting!
Aug 3, 2013 by L. Bagley
0
votes
I think it depends on the seller supplying the inventory here at amazon. I just put this in my shopping cart yesterday, (10-27-13) at $119.99. I waited until today to make my final purchase to be sure this was the model I wanted. As it happens, the priced dropped to $107.99 so I grabbed one before the price bounced back up again. But everywhere else I saw this model for sale, including the Bodum website, had a price of $120.00, give or take a buck or 2. The only time I saw it priced way higher was some of the 3rd party sellers here on amazon with ridiculously high prices like $189.00. Hope this helps answer your question.
Oct 28, 2013 by shrinking footprint
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