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25 of 25 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very Nice! Almost Perfect
This is my second french press coffee maker. I also own the Bodum Chambord 1928-16US6 model. They are the same size, both attractive, and both well-made items. I've come to expect that from Bodum items.

As you can see, they differ in price, and at the time of this review this model cost an extra 20 bucks over the 1928. So what makes this model cost so much...
Published on January 27, 2011 by Jeff Kraus

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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars over-complicated for the task
I really like my Bodum Chambord coffee presses -- I have several, and love the simplicity as well as the results. So I was quite prepared to be equally delighted with this one.

However, they went and over-complicated it. You put your coffee in the glass beaker, pour hot water, stir, and ... then you needlessly fuss over this separate inner lid on the plunger...
Published on February 13, 2011 by CS


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25 of 25 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very Nice! Almost Perfect, January 27, 2011
By 
Jeff Kraus (Orlando, FL USA) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
This is my second french press coffee maker. I also own the Bodum Chambord 1928-16US6 model. They are the same size, both attractive, and both well-made items. I've come to expect that from Bodum items.

As you can see, they differ in price, and at the time of this review this model cost an extra 20 bucks over the 1928. So what makes this model cost so much more, and is it worth the extra money?

Well the obvious difference is the color. The description for this model lists the color as "gold chrome". What's interesting is that it doesn't mention something that's prominently displayed on the box: The exterior is actually plated in 24k gold, not just gold-colored. I'm surprised it's not mentioned here, you'd think that would be a selling point for some people. On the other hand, the 1928 model is made of a chrome-plated brass.

The glass beakers inside are almost exactly the same (the difference is mentioned below), as are the plunger components - the screen, shaft, plunger ball, etc. The handles are basically the same, with the 1928 handle being very slightly larger (though not noticeably in-hand). They both come with a serving scoop as well.

The major difference is in the lid. The 1928 model lid lifts straight off, and when in place it blocks the passage of fluid through the spout unless it's turned to the correct position, where there is a strainer that allows the fluid to flow. It's just like the lid on one of those big plastic pitchers in that sense.

On the other hand, this gold model has a very different lid. Instead of lifting straight out, it needs to be turned a quarter turn before lifting it out, ensuring that it won't happen by accident. When you turn it to remove, the entire glass beaker section comes out, not just the lid. This is due to a good rubber seal between the glass and the plastic "inner" lid. This inner lid contains the spout, which differs from the 1928 in that the 1928's spout is a part of the beaker glass.

Flow of fluid out of the spout is stopped by a rubber stopper, which is lifted by pressing on the thumb lever above the handle.

The upshot of all this is that there is NO leaking as you tip it over. With the 1928, leaks happened when pouring. They were minor (maybe a drop here or there) but they were there. Not with this one.

Both of these models are also completely dishwasher safe, although I prefer to hand wash the beaker and exterior components just to be safe. From time to time I'll run the lids (with plunger and components) through the dishwasher.

The final difference is the base. You can see in the pictures for them, this model has a solid black plastic ring insulating the beaker from the counter top, whereas the 1928 model uses four chrome "feet". I see no appreciable difference between the two in actual use.

So now let's talk about the bad stuff. There's very little, really. The one annoying thing is the mesh screen and the metal piece below it that keeps it flat and round and pressed against the glass. Invariably, a good amount of coffee grounds gets stuck in between them, making cleaning a bit more than a simple scrub/rinse. It can take a few minutes to get those grounds out of there.

That's it, really. So with those differences in mind, the question you'll need to ask yourself is... is it work the extra 20 bones for those features?

For me , the answer is... eh, sort of. The better seal and improved spout on this model are definitely worth a little extra. But personally, I could take or leave the 24-karat gold plating. It's nice but it's not a functional difference. Maybe if there was one that was identical to this model, only chrome instead of gold, and it cost 5 or 10 dollars more than the 1928, that would be the perfect item. But really, this isn't far off. The price is still pretty good for the quality of the build.

Bottom line: I'd take half a star off (if I could) for the very minor screen issue, but I can't do half stars and it's a minor enough problem that I feel like I need to round up instead of down.
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Nicely made, but I still prefer my Frieling, March 13, 2012
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
I've been using this Bodum off and on for over a year now, along with my Frieling Polished Stainless French Press. I was tempted to write this review right after I got it because I wanted to compare it to the Frieling, but I decided to give it some time to grow on me. I'm glad that I waited, as this press has it's pros, but I still prefer the Frieling (which actually costs less at the time of this review). Below, I'll compare the two on different aspects.

-Aesthetics-
This is all personal choice, and the pictures here on Amazon do them both justice. In some ways I like the gold/glass look of the Bodum, but the simplicity of the stainless steel Frieling is my preference.

-Coffee Quality-
In my experience, they both produce the same quality of coffee. The plungers seal against the sides and strain the grounds equally well on both.

-Safety/Keeping Coffee Warm-
The Frieling wins here. It's an insulated design. The Bodum, while it looks nice and lets you see the coffee through the glass, doesn't retain heat very well in the coffee. So...the sides on the Bodum get hotter than on the Frieling, and the coffee cools off faster.

-Ease of Use-
Here's an area where the Frieling has an edge. The Bodum is slightly more complicated because it is designed to prevent liquid from pouring unless you push down on a lever. As such, the lid is more complex with a rubber seal that needs to be engaged and locked in place - it's not difficult, but even being used to it, I don't get it lined up correctly every time. The Frieling lid just sits on top - I don't know how it could be easier. Pushing the plunger through the coffee is equally easy on both designs.

-Ease of Cleaning-
This is a toss up to me. Neither is difficult to clean, but they both take some time because of the multiple parts. While the Bodum has more parts and is a bit more complex, the main body disassembles into the glass cylinder and the gold container, making them lightweight and easy to wash. The Frieling main body is a bit heavier, and the open handle (not a closed loop) is harder to keep a grip on when it gets soapy...but it has fewer parts.

-Longevity-
Here's another area where the Frieling wins, and I think handily. The Frieling is a tank. It's all stainless steel, and I don't see any parts of it wearing out anytime soon. The Bodum, on the other hand, has several plastic parts, a hinge for the pouring lever, and a rubber sealing ring for the lid. The sealing ring on mine was damaged when I opened it for the first time (there's a measuring spoon that is included, and it lodged against the ring when I tried to pull up on the plunger). Luckily, I was able to rotate the ring so that the damaged area isn't near the pouring spout, but I didn't rotate it until I tried to pour coffee and a bunch leaked down the front. So, if the sealing ring wears out or gets damaged, you need a new one or you can't really use the lid/spot anymore. Also, the gold has begun to wear off in very small areas on my Bodum after about a year, whereas the Frieling still looks like new.

In conclusion, the Bodum is nice - but I don't think that it's as nice or will last as long as the Frieling, and the Frieling is less expensive right now. If you really like the aesthetics of the Bodum, go for it - it works just fine. If you want an insulated, simple, and robust press - go for the Frieling.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Desirable Enhancement Over Standard French Press, February 3, 2011
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
Looks aren't everything, but when it comes to this Gold French Press, it certainly does make the experience more enjoyable. Not only does the black accents make the gold plating more attractive, but the mechanism itself has some great features. This model has a lid that turns and locks into place. This is a wonderful feature (which other models don't have) because it is safer and it keeps the coffee aromas and flavors locked in tightly during the brewing cycle. Additionally when the plunger is pushed, the lid-locking mechanism reduces the chances that the coffee will come spurting out the top. Another really great feature is the pouring spout and lever. The lever provides more control while pouring the coffee from the pot into a mug and for anyone who has ever had a French press slip from their hands, or the lid slide forward while pouring, you know that this is a very desirable enhancement over the standard French press.

If you have never tasted coffee made via French press, you are in for a real treat. Compared to the drip method, a French press coffee pot retains significantly greater amounts of flavor and richness from the coffee beans and yet isn't as complicated as a pressure brew machine and is very easy to clean. The filtering mechanism disassembles into individual pieces for cleaning and reassembles just as easily. It is also one of the fastest coffee brewing mechanism. Simply add hot water to the coffee grounds (coarsely ground is best) in the glass container, twist on the lid and wait 5 minutes. Press and enjoy.

For those who are unfamiliar with French Press coffee pots, you need to be sure the coffee grounds really are coarsely ground. Finer ground coffee fragments could slip through the filtering mechanism and end up your cup. Also keep in mind that since the coffee grounds are in the water, the longer you leave the pot sitting, the stronger the coffee becomes.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars over-complicated for the task, February 13, 2011
By 
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
I really like my Bodum Chambord coffee presses -- I have several, and love the simplicity as well as the results. So I was quite prepared to be equally delighted with this one.

However, they went and over-complicated it. You put your coffee in the glass beaker, pour hot water, stir, and ... then you needlessly fuss over this separate inner lid on the plunger unit, that you sort of screw in to this plastic holder at the top of the beaker. Why? What good does it do? This inner lid has a little pouring hole, which has a little spring-loaded cover, which can be opened by pushing a little lever (that little black tab you see above the handle). I haven't found that the simpler, more basic model has ever needed any improvement, but I guess someone at Bodum decided that there was a market for a gold-plated (yes!) over-complicated coffee press.

I can't say it's bad, since it works just the same way as any other coffee press. But I find it silly. I'm sticking to my un-gilded models, thank you.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A great way to turn beans into coffee, February 1, 2011
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
I am a coffee fanatic, and a good French press has long been one of my favorite ways to make an excellent cup of coffee - and among all the French press alternatives, Bodum is my personal choice. This unit - like my other Bodums - makes a fine cup of coffee...generally somewhat strong and full-bodied, plus there's something gratifying about making your coffee "by hand" in something so simple as a French Press.

Unlike most other methods, a French press puts ensures all the beans come in contact with hot water in a uniform way, releasing the full flavor of the bean all at once. If you are a fanatic like me, you will want to heat your water to 185-190 degrees...any hotter tends to scald the coffee, risking a somewhat bitter taste, while any cooler doesn't really get the full flavor out of the coffee.

I like to rinse the bowl in hot water before I begin, bringing it up to a nice warm temperature so as to keep the pot warm longer. For brewing, my method is to barely cover the grounds in hot water for about a minute while gently sloshing the bean/hot water mixture around. Then, I add the rest of the water and let it steep for another four minutes. At the end of the cycle, activate the press. Voila - mated with a fine bean (I like the milder varieties, such as a Jamaican Blue Mountain), this is coffee heaven.

The construction quality on this particular press is very good. Instead of the typical chrome plating, this one is plated in 24K gold, giving it an elegant touch. The handle is comfortable and sturdy, and all of the parts (with the exception of a few plastic ones) seem like they will last a long time. The lid design is airtight and helps to keep your coffee warmer. Still, it doesn't have the double-wall glass of some of the higher-end Bodum presses, so it will tend to cool quickly if not served promptly after brewing (or wrapped in an insulated sleeve - Bodum makes one that fits this press exactly). As on virtually all coffee products, I also find the "8-cup" label slightly misleading...it's a liter (34 ounces), so if you're like me and you like your coffee in large 8-12 ounce cups, this is more like 3-4 cups, not 8.

Afterwards, everything comes apart easily and the unit is easy to clean. I usually hand wash mine, though I suspect most of the parts would be fine in the dishwasher. The plunger, screen and so on come apart, making it simple to ensure that you get all the grounds out.

Overall, if you love coffee and don't have a quality French Press, I'd give the Bodum high marks, especially considering the reasonable price here on Amazon. Definitely recommended!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Makes a great cup of Joe. What more could you ask for?, January 31, 2011
By 
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
The good:
1. This makes an excellent cup of coffee. Coffee experts often swear by the French Press method for the best coffee.
2. All parts are dishwasher safe (this is important because the new lid has more pieces than the old ones).
3. The spout mechanism prevents spilling when moving the coffee pot around. Simply press on the lid mechism to open spout and pour.
4. It is a nice looking piece of equipment.

The bad:
1. The gold color doesn't match most modern chrome and stainless kitchens. A minor problem -- but it does affect people's choices.
2. It costs significantly more than the regular Bodum models (that's 24 carat gold, you know).

This coffee press makes great coffee. Bodum has been the king of the French Press for many years, and although they haven't re-invented the wheel, this is a step up from my old Bodum press. The lid has been changed, the handle is slightly different, and most obviously -- it is gold (24 carat gold plated, that is). The lid is a little tricky to remove the first time. You must turn the lid about a quarter-turn to disengage it from the beaker. This isn't too hard, but I was concerned that I might break something by pulling on the lid or turning too hard. And, to make it a little more confusing, the instructions are buried at the bottom of the beaker. For people with arthritis or hand strength issues, I think that the lid might be a bit of a problem. For me, it was fine once I figured out what I was supposed to be doing. I really like that the lid prevents spilling until you are ready to pour. I am especially pleased that clean up is so easy. Many manufacturers warn against dishwasher, but Bodum specifically states that all parts are dishwasher safe. I also believe that the new lid will help the beaker to keep the coffee hot a little longer.

For those who aren't used to this method of coffee making, instructions are included. Most important is to buy the right coffee for the press. Coarse grind is a must. Smaller grinds clog the filter and seep through it and end up in your coffee cup.

I highly recommend it. I only took off one star because I really don't like the gold color.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Bodum One Litre French Press, February 24, 2011
Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
This is a well made little gadget. The glass beaker is press fit in it's base and fits so snug that it would probably stay in place if you turned it upside down and shook. The wire mess screen that is used to trap the coffee grinds fits well too, at least when the press is new. The directions suggest using a course ground coffee, but the filter traps normal size grounds. The top can be confusing as I expected to have to turn the top to a locked position to protect from spilling, but that is not necessary. The top prevents spilling in its ready to use position. This is a well made device.

The glass beaker is not graduated so that an extra step of measuring the amount of water before pouring is required. The glass beaker is also very thin. The directions warn not to use boiling water and the glass is thin enough that I fear boiling water might crack the glass. Because the glass is so thin the coffee loses alot of it's heat after four minutes of brewing and it is almost too cool to drink.

One of these days someone will invent a French Press that is not a chore to clean after use. Until then, this press is on the top of the list of ones to buy.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Perfect, February 25, 2013
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
Looks great. Makes great coffee. I like that you have to depress the lever at the top to pour the coffee, keeping it warmer for longer. Haven't seen that on a french press before. Adjustable tension on the filter. Makes me happy every morning.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good Coffee, bad design, January 15, 2013
By 
James A. Watriss (Somerville, MA USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Bodum Chambord 8-Cup French Press Coffee Maker, Silver (Kitchen)
The old Chambord was a damn near perfect product. Some say not to fix things that aren't broken.

The gasket under the spout leaks. Not enough, but just enough to let a few drips run out from underneath the spout, down the front of the press, and onto the table cloth.

It's still a Bodum Press, so the coffee is great. But the mess, and flimsy-feeling design, just doesn't do it for me.

More here:

[...]
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars IN LOVE - I WILL NEVER DRIP BREW COFFEE AGAIN!!!, April 20, 2012
By 
Jennifer Cox (NEW YORK, NEW YORK, US) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Bodum Chambord 8-Cup French Press Coffee Maker, Silver (Kitchen)
After my first attempt at using a french press this morning - I came to realization that clearly I never had a really good cup of home-brewed coffee in my life - until today. It is as if I am born again! DON'T be afraid to try a french press. Really. It isn't hard at all. There are lots of videos on YouTube that will show you how easy it is. Regarding this specific model, I got the silver and it is very attractive and beautifully made. I know some people don't really like the lock top, but I do. I have cats that like to get into everything and don't want to take the chance of one of them knocking it over. The one thing I did wrong on this first attempt was that I accidentally lock-aligned the spout with the handle. When I went to pour I realized it, and turned the top around. You will see there is an arrow on the top. That little arrow must face the spout when the lid is locked down. The locking mechanism is two grooves that simply slide in place as you turn the top. It's easy. Another thing I almost forgot to do was pour the remaining coffee into a separate carafe so that the brew doesn't keep brewing. But I caught it in time. I kept the remaining serving in a large cup in the microwave which you can easily reheat for 30 seconds. I guess that can be the only downside of using a french press. If you are serving more than two people, or like to drink lots and lots of coffee, it may not be so efficient. As for cleanup: buy a toothbrush to scrub the grains away from the screen. French press brewing is not hard, it's just different from what most of us are used to. I am going to love the ritual of this method!
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