Qty:1
  • List Price: $19.00
  • Save: $4.75 (25%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 14 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Bogle on Mutual Funds: Ne... has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Eligible for Amazon's FREE Super Saver/Prime Shipping, 24/7 Customer Service, and package tracking. 100% Satisfaction Guarantee.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Bogle on Mutual Funds: New Perspectives for the Intelligent Investor Paperback – October 4, 1994


See all 6 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$14.25
$5.67 $0.01
$14.25 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Only 14 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.


Frequently Bought Together

Bogle on Mutual Funds: New Perspectives for the Intelligent Investor + The Little Book of Common Sense Investing: The Only Way to Guarantee Your Fair Share of Stock Market Returns + Common Sense on Mutual Funds: Fully Updated  10th Anniversary Edition
Price for all three: $45.81

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Holiday Deals in Books
Holiday Deals in Books
Find deals for every reader in the Holiday Deals in Books store, featuring savings of up to 50% on cookbooks, children's books, literature & fiction, and more.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Dell; Reprint edition (October 4, 1994)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0440506824
  • ISBN-13: 978-0440506829
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.7 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (38 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #253,328 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

In this awesome overview of investment company products and services, Bogle, founder and CEO of the $110-billion Vanguard group of funds, demonstrates that "the abundance of information available about mutual funds is . . . overwhelming." Among the minute details included, Bogle tells not only how to improve your backhand, as it were, but how to get the best grass or clay for the tennis court. Fund categories past and present--index, international, income, growth, industry-specialized (electronic, health), long- and short-term bond (U.S., corporate, "junk"), along with sales charges pro and con (Vanguard has none), high-low expense ratios, management track records and tax considerations--all are dissected to the ultimate percentile in relation to investor objectives and an inconstant economic climate. There is certainly something here for everyone, but in the aggregate the author reaches beyond the needs (and possibly the comprehension) of readers not engaged in the investment business. 70,000 first printing; first serial to Money; Fortune Book Club main selecton.
Copyright 1993 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

Bogle, chairman and CEO of the $110 billion Vanguard Group of mutual funds, thoroughly discusses the risks and rewards of investing in mutual funds. He explains how to select among the four basic categories of funds: common stock, bond, money market, and balanced. He argues convincingly that a passively managed "index fund" costs less and is more reliable than a fund managed by someone making weighted bets on individual securities, sectors, and the economy. This message is similar to that found in Burton Malkiel's classic The Random Walk Down Wall Street ( LJ 6/1/90). Bogle, long the mutual fund industry's loudest critic, denounces its misleading advertising, mediocre performance, and selfishness. Sprinkled throughout the text are "caveat emptor" boxes that warn readers of the hidden pitfalls of mutual fund investing. Strongly recommended for public library collections.
- Robert Kruthoffer, Lane P.L., Hamilton, Ohio
Copyright 1993 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

John C. Bogle (Bryn Mawr, PA) is Founder of The Vanguard Group, Inc., and President of the Bogle Financial Markets Research Center. He created Vanguard in 1974 and served as Chairman and Chief Executive Officer until 1996 and Senior Chairman until 2000. He had been associated with a predecessor company since 1951, immediately following his graduation from Princeton University, magna cum laude in Economics. The Vanguard Group is one of the two largest mutual fund organizations in the world. Headquartered in Malvern, Pennsylvania, Vanguard comprises more than 100 mutual funds with current assets totaling about $742 billion. Vanguard 500 Index Fund, the largest fund in the group, was founded by Mr. Bogle in 1975. In 2004, TIME magazine named Mr. Bogle as one of the world's 100 most powerful and influential people, and Institutional Investor presented him with its Lifetime Achievement Award. In 1999, FORTUNE designated him as one of the investment industry's four "Giants of the 20th Century." In the same year, he received the Woodrow Wilson Award from Princeton University for distinguished achievement in the nation's service."

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
5 star
30
4 star
5
3 star
3
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 38 customer reviews
I got so that I hardly ever checked the market.
Gary Peterson
It provided a lot of good basic information about investment basics.
JGP
If you don't then hear him speak; you'll beg for the book.
ncmurphy@ix.netcom.com

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

38 of 38 people found the following review helpful By C Jones on April 8, 2001
Format: Paperback
For almost a decade now, this has been my bible on mutual funds. Using a straightforward and candid approach, Vanguard founder John Bogle explains every aspect of mutual funds and the industry behind them. Never does Bogle exaggerate information or mislead the reader as many other financial "guru's" do to sell their books. He is a true consumer advocate and his goal is clearly to educate.
Covered is everything from stocks, bonds, money market funds, indexing, asset allocation, expense ratio's and the risks inherent not only in investing but in not investing (e.g. the erosion of the dollar vs. inflation in "safe" investments). Bogle utilizes numerous graphs and statistical data throughout the book to help make his point and to allow the reader increased comprehension.
It is important to note that this book was published in the early 1990's. Since then capital gains tax laws have changed and the Roth IRA was yet to be created. For more up-to-date information I would recommend reading Bogle's newer book, Common Sense on Mutual Funds. Nevertheless, Bogle On Mutal Funds is a great place to start educating yourself to become more financially savvy. This book has been invaluable to me and I believe it is key to my investing success. I find myself often referring to it, expecially now in these turbulent market times just to hear Mr. Bogle remind me to, "stay the course" and I will be rewarded. No wonder so many admirers refer to the beloved Mr. Bogle as, "Saint Jack."
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Hardcover
Despite the fact that tens of millions own mutual funds, few know how to go about it for the best results. This book was the first and still is the best overview of the whole subject. The book is well designed for both beginning and more advanced investors. Over the course of a lifetime, this book should help you gain many additional thousands of dollars.
The first three chapters are the basics for new investors. The first chapter explains the benefits of compound interest, and how high returns for a long time earn you much more. The second chapter looks at inflation, income, and principal risk. The implication is to choose between the risks and rewards of equities and bonds. The former gives you more potential for gains, but can be more volatile. If you are going to be a very long-term holder, equities will be better than bonds. The third chapter looks at the basics of mutual funds and how they work.
The fourth through the seventh chapters look at how to select various types of mutual funds (equities, bonds, money markets, and balanced). In the eighth chapter, you can find out how to get information about specific mutual funds. Most comes from prospectuses and Morningstar.
Many of the key insights come in chapters nine through eleven. In the ninth chapter, you will learn the advantages of index funds (you will beat almost all other funds of the same type). In the tenth chapter, the importance of finding funds with low costs is explained. In the eleventh, you will find out about the tax costs associated with a high turnover of portfolios.
The twelfth chapter looks carefully at the rules of asset allocation. The thirteenth chapter provides model portfolios for how to implement various types of strategies for asset allocation.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 26, 1999
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Rare does one book cover so much territory and explore so many avenues of information as this tightly and thoroughly written discourse on everything "mutual fund." If there is a book that does it better, I've not seen it. This key text is supplemented with numerous boxes for caveats, and punctuated with plenteous graphs to explicate the material presented. Sometimes, the technical information gets short-shrift, and many of the statements already belie the book's age. Even so, no investor should proceed with confidence until this book is thoroughly read, digested, and implemented.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Joe Cool on February 16, 2004
Format: Paperback
I read this book when it first came out ten years ago at the beginning of the bull market. At the time the book had mixed reviews. One of Bogle's warning, and probably the best advice, is to watch out for funds that charge high fees and to study all the fees charged in all funds. I remember one reviewer feeling that Bogle was overreacting to the fees that funds charged and that fund managers are really on our side. Fast-forward to today, we have the mutual fund scandal and we learn that mutual fund managers aren't really working on our best interests. Though reading this book can't help you spot all the bad apples ( the Janus family has alot of no-load funds and it was implicated in the scandal) it can help you be aware and thus be more weary. In a nutshell, this book is comprehensive,honest and prescient. John Bogle is the conscience of the mutual fund industry.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By ej76az on September 28, 1997
Format: Paperback
All Americans who invest in mutual funds should consider John C. Bogle a real American hero for revolutionizing the mutual fund business, thereby greatly enriching institutional and small investors alike. In this clearly-organized, information-packed book, Bogle explains the basics of mutual fund investing, exposes the hideous truths about actively-managed mutual funds, and proves the superiority and beauty of index funds. The bottom line: (1) The vast majority of managed funds underperform their respective relevant market indexes, (2) there is no reliable way to predict which few managed funds will outperform the market, and (3) the intelligent investor therefore invests in index funds. If you want to learn the truth about mutual funds, read this book. If you want to succeed in mutual fund investing, follow Bogle's advice.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews