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  • Bomb the Rocks: Early Days Singles 1989-1996
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Bomb the Rocks: Early Days Singles 1989-1996 Import


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Audio CD, Import, April 12, 2004
$32.59

Product Details

  • Audio CD (April 12, 2004)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Import
  • Label: Shock
  • ASIN: B0002557KG
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (19 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,300,241 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Bomb The Twist
2. Jane In The Jungle
3. Three Cool Chicks
4. Guitar Date
5. Woo Hoo
6. Dream Boy
7. Continental Hop
8. Jump, Jack, Jump
9. Smilly Willy
10. Mr. Lee
11. It's Rainy
12. Road Runner
13. My Boyfriend From Outer Space
14. She Was A Mau Mau
15. Long Tall Sally
16. Scream
17. Hot Generation
18. Bond Girl
19. Fruit Bubble Love
20. Motorcycle Go-Go-Go
See all 27 tracks on this disc

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By David B. Isbell on August 14, 2004
Format: Audio CD
My review is based upon the final six songs of this CD; the actual rating is 3 1/2 stars so I rounded up instead of down. Until about two days ago I had no idea the 5.6.7.8.'s were even associated with the Kill Bill movies, and I was also unable to convince anyone that the 5.6.7.8.'s existed, even among Japanese Americans in Southern California. I once owned a CD copy of their EP "I Was a Teenage Cavewoman" that was released on the Tokyo Karate label in Australia in 1992 or 1993. I have been trying to locate a replacement copy for many years.

All the songs that were on that album happen to be the same last six songs on "Bomb the Rocks." Being a fan of 80's New Wave since I was a teen and not having much exposure to true Punk music, the best I can say is that the 5.6.7.8.'s seem to be more of a gritty, fairly hard-hitting (at times) and whimsical garage surfer-punk band. Their English clearly needs work but the music is too darn catchy to care. One girl they refered to as "Velvet Voice" on the "Cavewoman" album is anything but velvety. She has the most impressive gravel-like scream I have ever heard from a woman in any band, and she expresses her talent often.

"Eddie is a Sweet Candy" feels about as fun as the old 60's tune "Wipe-Out" and is definitely a catchy high-energy tune, worth repeating back-to-back plays. "Blue Radio" is a slow heart break tune that is anything but heart breaking. Velvet Voice opens the song by moaning her woes and floats us through a few verses before unleashing her tormented shriek which carries through to the finale. If the stereo is too loud the neighbors might wonder who is dying.

The 5.6.7.8.'s are really in a class all their own although I tend to liken them to the B-52's (only slightly), pre-1990's Divinyls, Fuzzbox (the 5.6.7.8.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By C. Blair on October 18, 2005
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
If you like punk rock, new wave, surf music from Quentin Tarantino movies, surf music from Southern Culture on the Skids, Dick Dale, and Link Wray - then you will find this CD entertaining. The influence of Dick Dale's guitar style and the general sound of 60s surf music is prevalent in many songs. This CD is a chronology of, what I assume to be, their greatest hits. As their name indicates, they do draw from the 50s, 60s, 70s, and 80s. Influences from bebop to blues to rockabilly to acid rock can be heard somewhere on this CD. Don't be hung up on lyrics because their English is not very understandable, especially in their early work. But the raw, unrefined, genuine garage sound of their early work makes up for it. Although they clearly pay tribute to The Tubes by closing the song Pinball Party with a most articulate "don't touch me there".

There is an assortment of 50s style bebop tunes and covers, which I found to be the least listenable of the collection. I have found that there are about 8 songs I skip when listening to this CD and the last 8 songs are great (if you dig my first sentence in this review). The other songs that I do not skip have undeniable redeeming qualities and serve as a righteous tribute to this bands influences.

What this band has uniquely going for it is the effective use of screaming. Screaming is prevalent in their early work (like in the song Scream) and is somewhat trademarked in their later work as you hear the placement and tonal quality of the screaming become refined over time (as in the song Jet Coaster).

Overall, if you like rock music that is far from the mainstream, and that is guaranteed to wake up the neighbors and the dance floor, this CD is a worthy investment.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By David B. Isbell on August 6, 2004
Format: Audio CD
My review is based upon the final six songs of this CD; the actual rating is 3 1/2 stars so I rounded up instead of down. Until about two days ago I had no idea the 5.6.7.8.'s were even associated with the Kill Bill movies, and I was also unable to convince anyone that the 5.6.7.8.'s existed, even among Japanese Americans in Southern California. I once owned a CD copy of their EP "I Was a Teenage Cavewoman" that was released on the Tokyo Karate label in Australia in 1992 or 1993. I have been trying to locate a replacement copy for many years.

All the songs that were on that album happen to be the same last six songs on "Bomb the Rocks." Being a fan of 80's New Wave since I was a teen and not having much exposure to true Punk music, the best I can say is that the 5.6.7.8.'s seem to be more of a gritty, fairly hard-hitting (at times) and whimsical garage surfer-punk band. Their English clearly needs work but the music is too darn catchy to care. One girl they refered to as "Velvet Voice" on the "Cavewoman" album is anything but velvety. She has the most impressive gravel-like scream I have ever heard from a woman in any band, and she expresses her talent often.

"Eddie is a Sweet Candy" feels about as fun as the old 60's tune "Wipe-Out" and is definitely a catchy high-energy tune, worth repeating back-to-back plays. "Blue Radio" is a slow heart break tune that is anything but heart breaking. Velvet Voice opens the song by moaning her woes and floats us through a few verses before unleashing her tormented shriek which carries through to the finale. If the stereo is too loud the neighbors might wonder who is dying.

The 5.6.7.8.'s are really in a class all their own although I tend to liken them to the B-52's (only slightly), pre-1990's Divinyls, Fuzzbox (the 5.6.7.8.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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