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Bomber Boy: Rise of The Underwear Bomber Kindle Edition

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Length: 41 pages

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Product Details

  • File Size: 453 KB
  • Print Length: 41 pages
  • Publication Date: April 24, 2013
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services, Inc.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00CIUGEUU
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Lending: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,491,175 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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More About the Author

Endowed with a keen, analytical mind, and a knack for satire, Ike Pius is one of the hottest young writing talents out there.

He started as a photographer, from where he progressed to voice acting, and script editing. Ike Pius has under his belt contributions to a wide range of journals, magazines, and websites.

His novels address contemporary issues, while never failing to make the reader laugh.

Ike Pius is 6 ft 1, and is an avid sports fan.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By J. Chambers HALL OF FAMETOP 10 REVIEWER on June 27, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition
"Bomber Boy" could be right out of the current headlines, with its fictional story of a suicide bomber who plans to blow up a plane in midair. It was the perfect plan: the plane explodes, he goes straight to paradise, and 300 infidels go to hell. But - oops - the bomb didn't explode. Farouk Omar Muttab wasn't the stereotypical terrorist filled with hatred of westerners and their culture. He had just sort of drifted into a terrorist cell, following his friend Tafik. Ultimately, he took the suicide bombing assignment for the money promised to help his family.

Had the bomb exploded, Farouk's life would have ended, along with his problems, and his family would be secure. But it didn't explode, and now he was on the run from two enemies - a terrorist cell and the FBI, who found the bomb he left on the plane. Farouk's life-or-death decision about which side to trust would determine his fate.

I enjoyed "Bomber Boy." It was a very readable and believable story. The author's writing style and character development show real talent in his writing. It was a serious story, but it wasn't too grim, as the reader sees Farouk's human side as he gets into American life while on the run, even discovering how much he likes fast-food hamburgers. Editing and proofreading could be improved, however, since there were too many spelling and punctuation errors. But Nigerian author Ike Pius shows a lot of promise, and I'm looking forward to reading his future works.

A review copy of the book was provided by the author.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By The Review Board on September 18, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition
This abbreviated review comes from Review Board member Mr. Controversy. For the extended review please check out this link: [...]

*NOTE: "Bomber Boy" touches on EXTREMELY SENSITIVE matters that are reminiscent of September 11, specifically Islamic points of view and Terrorism. Reader Discretion Is Advised.*

Bomber Boy is a very sentimental story by Mr. Ike Pius about a young man named Farouk Omar Muttab who has had a streak of bad luck after his intended mission on a U.S. bound flight had gone wrong.

Citing the events on the plane, Farouk decides that blending in with the United States population is the most prudent course of action. In doing so, he had some unexpected company and things go on a bit of a roller coaster ride that climaxed at the right moments. With all that has occurred, it resulted in a finale that was somewhat interesting.

"Bomber Boy" is the sequel to the novel The Paradise That Was. Reading the latter will tie in the prior for the reader.

Sentence structure suffers from improper use of punctuation marks, chopped up sentences can be compounded for maximum effect, as well as utilization of homophones ("hiding in plane sight" vs. saying "hiding in plain sight"); all suggesting that an extra pair of eyes would not hurt.

"Bomber Boy" is indeed an eye opener of a character study where the reader will have several topics to wonder and ponder as they flip the pages of this very short 27 page read. The story is solid, and is worth a look.
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Format: Kindle Edition
I was actually approached by the author himself through my blog to see if I would be interested in reading a copy of his book in exchange for an honest review.

I don't mind admitting I was a bit sceptical to whether or not it would be something I would be interested in reading but after reading the description and some other reviews I thought I would give it a go.

Bomber Boy is a short story which was originally intended for a magazine. I have read many books where terrorism features as the main storyline but I have never read a book which has been from the prospective of a terrorist. Saying this though I don't think the main character, Farouk is fully committed to the idea either. There are parts of the book which I found to be quite humorous and later on ironic. Even though terrorism is something certainly not meant to be taken lightly I think the author is trying to give a slightly different approach to the subject.

Overall it is an enthralling read though slightly let down by the ending but I certainly would recommend this book to fellow readers and I would certainly read more by the author.
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By tasha lee on December 23, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition
So I had a friend ask me to read this short story that he wrote and tell him what I thought about it. I'm not going to lie, at first I really didn't want to do it. I was just doing this for a friend but lo and behold, to my surprise, the story was awesome. It involved intrigue, action, suspense, and everything in between. It is only 27 pages long and is a great read. It is about a dude named Farouk Omar Muttab who has it in his mind that the best thing to do to solve a problem he has (can't tell you what that problem is or that will ruin the story) is to blow stuff up. Please take the time to read it my friends, it is a excellent read and very well written, in my personal opinion
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By JGRWriter on December 5, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition
Talk about an interesting idea. Bomber Boy by Ike Pius is not for the overly sensitive. Honestly, I don’t believe I am, but this story kinda got to me. Though a simple tale, it was compelling all the same. With all that has been going on in the world of terror, we find an unlikely… (I don’t know what to call Farouk Omar Muttab). Part of me wants to condemn him as an antagonist, while the other part wants to view him as a protagonist. So what do you do? You see, the author builds a clear picture of the character’s background and draws you into Farouk Omar Muttab, the man. Even when he turns himself in and cooperates with the US government, giving up details about the organizers, and trying desperately to protect his own family with little regards for himself. When he got on a plane prepared to cause its demise, the ploy fell through and, fearing for his family, took selfless steps to set things straight, in a way. It’s difficult not to feel bad for him. That bothered me because I didn’t want to care about him.

You see, this story focuses on a young man that fell into the wrong crowd. Little did he know that his relations would cause him to become a potential terrorist. But you see, Farouk had genuine concerns, a family, felt trapped, etc… He did not genuinely hold the harsh views that one might associate with a terrorist. This is where it got complicated for me because I felt compassion for him, and then felt guilty for my emotions. So I would get angry, yet I couldn’t remain angry because the author shows a different side of what many might assume. Even to write this review, I’ve been struggling. What amazes me even more? It’s a very, very short read. The plot keeps things moving and many characters are incorporated into this quick read in a pretty decent manner.
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