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Bombshell: The Secret Story of America's Unknown Atomic Spy Conspiracy Hardcover – September 1, 1997

ISBN-13: 978-0788168062 ISBN-10: 0788168061 Edition: 0th

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Hardcover, September 1, 1997
$85.48
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Product Details

  • Hardcover
  • Publisher: Diane Pub Co (September 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0788168061
  • ISBN-13: 978-0788168062
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #9,987,681 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Recruited into the super-secret Manhattan Project while still a teenager, albeit a teenager who had already passed through Harvard, Ted Hall was unquestionably brilliant. But Hall, now an elderly physicist living in England, claims he was also very naive. While working to develop the atomic bomb for the United States, Hall approached Soviet intelligence and proceeded to pass along secrets. His breaches of security, while unknown outside intelligence circles until recently, dwarf the work of better-known Cold War operatives. And what's perhaps most startling is his motivation for giving the Soviets the secrets of the American bomb. Relying on recently declassified materials and interviews with the participants in the plot, Bombshell reads like an inventive spy novel, yet it's entirely true. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

Klaus Fuchs might have been the most famous Communist atomic spy from World War II, but young Theodore Alvin Hall also passed on scientific information from the Los Alamos laboratory, which helped the Russians explode their first atomic bomb in 1949. The U.S. intelligence community suspected Hall's involvement after breaking Soviet codes, but little about Hall's secret activities has been made public until now. Moscow-based journalists Albright and Kuntsel (Their Promised Land: Arab and Jew in History's Cauldron, LJ 11/1/90) base this readable account on interviews with Hall himself and others involved, supplemented by newly declassified materials in Moscow and Washington. They focus primarily on the war years and Hall's attempts to build a normal life in the 1950s. The authors do an especially good job of conveying the fear of capture that Hall and other spies experienced daily, and they provide lots of interesting details about tradecraft (how you actually commit espionage). Suitable for public and academic espionage collections.?Daniel K. Blewett, Loyola Univ. Lib., Chicago.
Copyright 1997 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 17 people found the following review helpful By houking@aol.com on November 11, 1997
Format: Hardcover
What can be said about a man who in his youth followed his conscience, albeit rashly, and betrayed to another country the most devastating secrets of military weaponry the world had ever known? This is a difficult moral question, not easily answered. This book shows the roots of Ted Hall's thought processes, his naturally rebellious nature, and the reasons why he chose to spy against his own country in a time of war. It also shows that he was far from alone in his ultimate decision to do so. There are other questions that are almost as difficult to answer. Why was security ridiculously lax at the Los Alamos facilities? How did Ted Hall and others manage to escape discovery for so long? While one cannot condone what occurred, it is easy to see why intelligent people felt compelled not to allow such potent information to remain the exclusive property of any one country. The aftermath of this information's dissemination may indeed have spared us another world war, but it also foreshadowed the inevitable consequences of the McCarthy witchhunt and an uncontrolled arms race. This is one of the more informative chapters of history at last unconvered.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By John C. Landon on April 25, 2003
Format: Hardcover
Beyond Fuchs et al, there had always been suspicions of an extra spy. Now we know. This is the gripping account of Ted Hall,code name Mlad, a teenage whiz kid who suddenly found himself at Los Alamos, savy enough to be at the dead center of bomb calculations, and deciding for idealistic reasons, refusing all payment, to share the secret of the atomic weapon with the Russians. Soon the a virtually complete description of how to construct a weapon is in the hands of the Communists. It is interesting that the original communication was decoded in the late forties, and that he was almost caught, but simply slipped through, until the opening of the archives after 1989.
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12 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Stephen M. St Onge on April 28, 1999
Format: Hardcover
4/28/99: Almost all histories of the Manhattan Project mention the quiet German refugee scientist, Klaus Fuchs, code name Charlz, who gave the Soviet Union a good working blueprint of the Nagasaki bomb. But a couple of weeks before Harry Gold picked up Fuch's information, KGB courier Lona Cohen met Ted Hall, code name Mlad ('youth'), in Albuquerque, and got an equally revealing description. BOMBSHELL fills in one of the major missing pieces of the puzzle of Soviet Espionage against the Manhatten Project. Now, if we can just find out who code names Pers, Kvant and Nejtron were, and what information Oppenheimer passed... Highly Recommended.
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7 of 10 people found the following review helpful By N. S. Burk on December 3, 1999
Format: Hardcover
The authors present detailed and complex research very clearly and offer the reader a comprehensive study of one particular Manhattan project spy (Ted Hall). There are places, however, where history is turned into to sensationalism. Granted, this is meant to be a case study, but at times too much emphasis is placed on Hall's contribution to the spy network. One questions how important any individual person was in a secret operation so large. The authors fail to distance themselves from their subject and consequently do not write from a totally credible perspective.
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