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Bona Drag

61 customer reviews

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Audio CD, December 8, 1990
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Editorial Reviews

Certified at 500 thousand units by the RIAA. (2/01)

1. Piccadilly Palare
2. Interesting Drug
3. November Spawned A Monster
4. Will Never Marry
5. Such A Little Thing Makes Such A Big Difference
6. Last Of The Famous International Playboys
7. Ouija Board, Ouija Board
8. Hairdresser On Fire
9. Everyday Is Like Sunday
10. He Knows I'd Love To See Him
11. Yes, I Am Blind
12. Lucky Lisp
13. Suedehead
14. Disappointed

Product Details

  • Audio CD (December 8, 1990)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Warner Off Roster
  • ASIN: B000002LLI
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (61 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #60,451 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Steve Bradford on May 22, 1999
Format: Audio CD
Former "Smiths" frontman Steve Morrissey had plenty to sing about after his departure from one of Manchester's most prolific bands, The Smiths. His patented whine and curious songwriting made him hip in the '80s. His songs were hardly one of inspiration. Indeed, many music listeners during this time turned to alternative for as sense of reality; far from the bubbly, happy-go-annoying music that perpetuated the big '80s music scene.
Yet Morrisey took his brand of musical misery to new heights. Already popular after the Smiths, "Bona Drag" is a compilation of his early solo music. It delights and excites! Songs like "Suedehead," mocked the punk rockers who were letting their hair grow out, and thus, becoming ostracized. "Interesting Drug" prods both animal rights and English politics. While "Last of the Famous International Playboys" (clearly one of Morrisey's best works) haggles two of England's most infamous criminals, Reggie and Ronny Kray. Other standouts such as "Ouija board..." and "Hairdresser on Fire" lend to Morrisey's inspirational side. He's one charmer and lend many hints to his subdued abilities.
Both Smith's and Morrissey fans will be glad to know that minus guitar player/songwriter Jonny Marr, the original Smiths bassist and drummer play on most of these songs. Furthermore, the very cripst guitar of Stephen Street give Morrissey an added fluidity. These songs can be found on the now-rare "Morrissey-'Hulmerist'" VHS video.
"Bona Drag" is a compilation of Morrissey's best work, I believe. His latter work has gone more raw and unforgiving. It lacks much of the emotion and catchyness of his earlier work. Yet I really enjoyed the "Bona Drag" compilation. I think you will too!
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Jay Scott on June 10, 2003
Format: Audio CD
This is the album that made me...well, maybe not a Morrissey fan, per se, but at least turned me onto a smatch of previously obscure tunes that quickly became personal favorites.
The impetus behind my buying this album in '90 escapes me, as I wasn't familiar with even one tune. But my blind leap of faith was rewarded for, even though I was just out of my teens, I was still a moody bugger and Morrissey's incessant whine and English misery were a perfect soundtrack for my life.
As I've grown on, I've continued to appreciate the tunes for what they are: well-crafted, alternately dark and whimsical pop tunes. It's a fine collection of a-sides and equally worthy b-sides, with an album track or two thrown in for full measure. Some of these tunes are not available on album elsewhere, so you should complement, or at least begin (and possibly end) your Morrissey collection here.
In today's age of (add nausea here) punk-metal, rap-punk, blah blah blah, all of it being faux-punk (see any current excessively tattooed band for examples of this), real and respectable pop music such as this is a rare and welcome treat. Where is our Morrissey of today? And please don't say John Mayer.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By The Groove on August 13, 2002
Format: Audio CD
Since the Smiths disbanded in 1987, Morrissey's solo work has been as consistent as the cash flow in my checking account. But if you want a one-stop guide to Mozzer at his solo peak, "Bona Drag" is the way to go. This compilation of singles, b-sides, and album cuts covering 1988-1990 shows the many sides of Morrissey: cynical, detatched, hilarious, and insightful. "Yes, I am Blind," "Will Never Marry," and "Everyday Is Like Sunday" reinforce Mozzer as one of pop's leading prophets of gloom. And I'm probably the only person who doesn't think "Ouija Board" is the disaster many people think it is. Other key favorites of mine are the lovely "Disappointed" and the well-crafted "He Knows I'd Love to See Him." Some casual listeners may turn a contemptuous nose at this album, arguing that it isn't on par with his work with the Smiths. To that I say, "rubbish." "Bona Drag" is a fine album on its own terms, and it's a great place to introduce yourself to one of Britian's great lyricists.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Elaine on November 14, 2002
Format: Audio CD
I have owned this album for approximately two years now and it's one of my most treasured albums from my entire collection. When I first purchased it the songs took getting used to, but after a couple of listens I was completely hooked. This album has a great mix of upbeat music with "piccadilly palare" and "suedehead" and beautiful, meaningful slow songs like "yes, I am blind" and "he knows I'd love to see him". This music is not only meaningful, but the lyrics are brilliantly written.
A lot of people complain that Morrissey could never be as good as the Smiths, I actually feel that Morrissey is just as good as the Smiths, if not better. Since I've purchased this album I've been listening to it more than I listen to all my Smiths Albums. So for all you skeptical Smiths fans, don't let you love and devotion for the Smiths deter you from purchasing this amazing album.
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56 of 81 people found the following review helpful By James F. Colobus on June 14, 2002
Format: Audio CD
"Bona Drag versus Hatful of Hollow. Why are we even having this conversation?" you snicker, "Who cares about old Brit-pop? Let's talk about the new Korn CD - it rawks!"
I take a deep breath and respond, "Not so fast, my nu-metal loving friend. Bona Drag versus Hatful of Hollow is an issue worth exploring. Take a time machine back and talk to your typical English kid or some of the girls in my Virginian high school in the 1980s and they'd scoff at the prospect of a solo Morrissey album ever approaching the greatness of Hatful of Hollow. Well, first of all, they'd be reduced to tears when they heard that the Smiths would be breaking up in a few years, but then they'd say Morrissey could never succeed without Johnny Marr. And after spending an hour listening to `Hatful of Hollow' you'd have to admit that their argument would be pretty seductive.
"Seductive in the 1980s, that is, but not anymore. The way I see it, Bona Drag is every bit as good as Hatful of Hollow. Sure, Hatful of Hollow rocks a little harder, but Bona Drag is a little more sophisticated. Let's semi-randomly compare tracks 2, 3, 4, and 13 on the two albums. Hatful of Hollow has `What Difference Does it Make', `These Things Take Time', `This Charming Man', and `Girl Afraid'. Bona Drag counters with `Interesting Drug', `November Spawned a Monster', `Will Never Marry' and `Suedehead'. It's a standoff, I tell you."
"Come on", you say, "Not that I really care, but you can't possibly like both albums equally. Which one would you keep if you could only have one?"
"That, my friend, is not a very nice question. The idea of being without one of these two albums is very upsetting. But, in the spirit of cooperation, I will answer your query: Hatful of Hollow."
"Why?
Read more ›
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