Bone by Bone: Comparing Animal Skeletons and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy New
$23.94
Qty:1
  • List Price: $26.60
  • Save: $2.66 (10%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Trade in your item
Get a $2.95
Gift Card.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Bone by Bone: Comparing Animal Skeletons Library Binding – August 1, 2013


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Library Binding
"Please retry"
$23.94
$21.93 $19.92



Frequently Bought Together

Bone by Bone: Comparing Animal Skeletons + Why Don't Your Eyelashes Grow?: Curious Questions Kids Ask About the Human Body + The Evolution of Calpurnia Tate
Price for all three: $44.29

Buy the selected items together

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Top 20 Books for Kids
See the books our editors' chose as the Best Children's Books of 2014 So Far or see the lists by age: Baby-2 | Ages 3-5 | Ages 6-8 | Ages 9-12 | Nonfiction

Product Details

  • Library Binding: 32 pages
  • Publisher: Lerner Publishing Group (August 1, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0761384642
  • ISBN-13: 978-0761384649
  • Product Dimensions: 11.4 x 9.6 x 0.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #364,598 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

K-Gr 2–Levine takes a unique approach to comparative anatomy. The purpose of the book is to illustrate differences between human and animal bone structures. Each page presents a question, e.g., “What kind of animal would you be if your finger bones grew so long that they reached your feet?” The answer is revealed with the turn of the page (“A bat!”). The bright, stylized, color illustrations match each question, portraying cartoon children with distorted anatomy, such as a girl with a neck like a giraffe's, or a snake with a human head. Some may find the gloppy piles of cartoon children with no bones unappetizing, while others may find the peculiar images amusing. Many of the riddlelike questions will play well in a storytime setting, allowing readers to ask a question and permitting children to imagine and participate in the answer. Bone by Bone does not have the detailed informational content or illustrative depth of Steve Parker's Skeleton (DK, 1988), but it does succeed in presenting basic structural differences among animals. This unusual book is interactive and thought-provoking, if a little gross in certain sections.–Jeffrey Meyer, Mount Pleasant Public Library, IAα(c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

From Booklist

Alongside an illustration of skin collected in goopy puddles upon the sidewalk, the author asks, “Have you ever wondered what we would look like if we didn’t have any bones?” Children will enjoy the humorous illustrations and labeled diagrams as they predict the morphing of a human skeleton, Dr. Moreau–style, into that of various animals. By adding vertebrae to a boy’s back—presto!—he has a tail. And by removing leg and arm bones, just like that he becomes a snake. The author makes a careful distinction between vertebrate and vertebrae, but adults will likely have to make further explanations to younger children. Then, with the question, “Could you be an animal if you didn’t have any bones at all?” the book switches briefly to invertebrates. With its wild, inventive, and occasionally alarming animal-human mash-ups, this works as a lighter companion to Steve Jenkins’ Bones: Skeletons and How They Work (2010). Grades K-3. --J. B. Petty

More About the Author

Sara Levine is an assistant professor of biology at Wheelock College and a veterinarian. She holds an MFA in creative nonfiction from Lesley University and has taught writing and literature courses there as well. Her publications include mostly science-related essays for adults, one of which was nominated for a Pushcart Prize in 2007. Her writing has appeared in the Health and Science section of the Boston Globe, The Massachusetts Review, Bayou, and in an anthology titled And Baby Makes More. In addition to teaching college level students, she has also been teaching children's environmental education classes for the Massachusetts Audubon Society and other nature centers in Massachusetts and Connecticut for over 15 years. Bone by Bone: Comparing Animal Skeletons is her first book for children.

If you are a teacher looking for ideas on how to teach comparative anatomy to children, here's link to a blog she wrote for Wheelock College that might be of use: http://blog.wheelock.edu/science-education-can-be-creative-and-fun/

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
5 star
10
4 star
0
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 11 customer reviews
Well written and illustrated.
G Mohr
Once you turn the page it’s easy to see that the giraffe is the owner of that type.
D. Fowler
Bone by Bone is thoroughly engaging as it sparks children's interest in anatomy.
Wlibrarian

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Natalie Lorenzi on July 26, 2013
Format: Library Binding
As soon as I read the e-galley of Bone by Bone, I ordered a copy for our school library. It's rare to find a book on life science that's so appealing for very young children, yet has lots to offer for upper elementary kids, as well.

The various fonts are visually appealing without feeling too busy, and delightful illustrations help readers to imagine what they might look like if they had, say, extra vertebrae (a tail) or finger bones that reached the ground (like a bat's webbed fingers). The information is delivered in a clear, straightforward manner with a Q&A format that will get kids predicting before each page-turn.

The back matter-sections titled More About Bones and More About Vertebrates, and recommended books and websites for further reading-can all be used for differentiating instruction for kids who want to go more in depth with the information in the book. Struggling readers or English Language Learners can use the illustrations to grasp the book's main idea.

Although this is an any-time-of-year book, it would be fun to include Bone by Bone in a Halloween display. Highly recommended.

My complete blog post on how teachers and librarians can use this book with kids is here: [...]
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By NWDCHM on August 13, 2013
Format: Library Binding Verified Purchase
I thought about headlines such as "great introduction to comparative anatomy" but that sounded too serious for such a fun book. The writing encourages the readers' involvement in thinking about their own structure and that of animals in our vertebrate family, using questions to pull the readers to the next page. This book is a great way to bridge many children's (and adults') interest in animals generally with learning about biology. Highly recommended for homes, schools, and libraries.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Marcy Dermansky on September 21, 2013
Format: Library Binding Verified Purchase
My daughter Nina loves this book. When we were done reading it, she said to me: "Bones hold a body up." I have learned a lot about bones, too.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Wlibrarian on August 11, 2013
Format: Library Binding
Bone by Bone is thoroughly engaging as it sparks children's interest in anatomy. Rather than presenting dry facts, a child's imagination is called into play as they consider extending their limbs and digits, and then taking some away. Kids come away with a tangible understanding of what they have in common with other animals and what makes each special.

The vocabulary is mostly simple; yet words like "vertabrae" can be challenging, even with the glossary, so prepare to be on hand to help younger readers.

A real page-turner (your opposable thumbs that is)!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By G Mohr on December 6, 2013
Format: Library Binding Verified Purchase
Fantastic book - even for our 10 and 13 year olds! Well written and illustrated. Bought it as a gift and kept it!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Shane Wamsley on January 9, 2014
Format: Library Binding Verified Purchase
I read this book to my three year old for a week and then we went to the museum to look at the skeleton displays.

Fantastic introduction into taxonomy. Although she still preferred the animatronics dinosaurs at the museum...sigh
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?